Log24

Monday, October 17, 2011

The Craftsman

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:24 AM

A follow-up to yesterday's Sunday School

(Click on images for some background.)

IMAGE- Dennis Ritchie, Amy Adams (Talladega Nights), and the Inferno operating system

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111017-InfernoOS-500w.jpg

 

Backstory—  "Plan 9 is an operating system kernel …."

Meditation— "How can you tell the craftsman from the craft?"
                          (Apologies to William Butler Yeats.)

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Taormina Dualism

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:23 PM

"At some point in Greek history, it was noticed that the capital upsilon—Y—
looked like a path branching left and right. The comparison, like so much
traditional material, was ascribed to the Pythagoreans, in accordance with
the dualism just mentioned; our earliest source for it, however, is as late as
the Roman poet Persius (Satires, 3.56)." 

— "The Garden of Forking Paths" in the weblog
   Varieties of Unreligious Experience, Nov. 21, 2006

Amy Adams at the Lancia Café in Taormina, Sicily, on June 15, 2013.
Adams was in Taormina for the Italian premiere of her Superman film.

See also this  journal on that date— June 15, 2013.

Posts related to the Garden of Forking Paths:  Witch Ball (Jan. 24, 2013),
Sermon for Harvard (Sept. 19, 2010), and Amy Adams + Craft.

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

Tuesday May 26, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM
For Daedalus
“Some writers describe the
first draft as ‘making clay’….”– Janet Burroway

Quoted here
a year ago today:

“… she explores
the nature of identity
in a structure of
crystalline complexity.”

 — Janet Burroway
(See ART WARS.)

For Stevie Nicks on her birthday: ART WARS: THE CRAFT

Related material:

Amy Adams in 'Doubt'

Amy Adams in Doubt

Stars of 'Doubt,' Amy Adams and Meryl Streep

Amy Adams and Meryl Streep
at premiere of Doubt

Janet Burroway's 'Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft,' fifth edition, with I Ching coins on cover

Above:
Craft, 1999

“The matron had given her
leave to go out as soon as
the women’s tea was over….”

— James Joyce, “Clay

Ite, missa est.”

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