Log24

Tuesday, April 7, 2009

Tuesday April 7, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:10 PM

x

Tuesday April 7, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:24 PM

Bright Star and Dark Lady

on July 26, 2003

“Mexico is a solar country — but it is also a black country, a dark country. This duality of Mexico has preoccupied me since I was a child.”

Octavio Paz,
quoted by Homero Aridjis

Bright Star

Amen.

 

Dark Lady

The same story on
May 11, 2005

 with a different
dark lady:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09/090407-SnowWhiteQueen.jpg

Monday, April 7, 2008

Monday April 7, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:07 PM
A year ago…

  (Holy Saturday, 2007) —

From Friedrich Froebel,
who invented kindergarten:

Froebel's Third Gift

For further details, see
Gift of the Third Kind
and
  Kindergarten Relativity.

Related material:

“… There was a problem laid out on the board, a six-mover. I couldn’t solve it, like a lot of my problems. I reached down and moved a knight…. I looked down at the chessboard. The move with the knight was wrong. I put it back where I had moved it from. Knights had no meaning in this game. It wasn’t a game for knights.”


— Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep

Perhaps, instead,
a game for jumpers?

The image “http://www.log24.com/images/IChing/hexagram35.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

See
Tom Stoppard’s Progress.

Monday April 7, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:00 PM
“LegacyPlus™:
 
The Class,
 Without the Classes”

The New York Times
on the date of
Charlton Heston’s death

Leave a space.”
 — Tom Stoppard      
in “Jumpers”

NY Times obituaries April 7, 2008: Charlton Heston, Helen Yglesias, George Switzer

“Heaven is a state, a sort of
   metaphysical state.”
— John O’Hara,
Hope of Heaven

Monday April 7, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:20 AM

“Lord Arglay had a suspicion that the Stone would be purely logical.  Yes, he thought, but what, in that sense, were the rules of its pure logic?”

— Charles Williams, Many Dimensions

Saturday, April 7, 2007

Saturday April 7, 2007

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:25 PM
Today's birthdays:
Francis Ford Coppola
and Russell Crowe

Gift of the Third Kind
 

Background:
Art Wars and
Russell Crowe as
Santa's Helper
.

From Friedrich Froebel,
who invented kindergarten:

Froebel's Third Gift

From Christmas 2005:

The Eightfold Cube

Related material from
Pittsburgh:

Reinventing Froebel's Gifts

… and from Grand Rapids:

Color Cubes

Click on pictures for details.

Related material
for Holy Saturday:

Harrowing,
"Hey, Big Spender,"
and
Santa Versus the Volcano.

Friday, April 7, 2006

Friday April 7, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:59 PM
Bright Star

From 7/14/04:

Today’s birthday:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04A/040714-BrightStar.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Esther Dyson

To be continued…

Friday April 7, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:27 AM
ART WARS
in Poetry Month

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06/060407-Heaven.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Tomorrow is the final day
for the Liza Lou exhibit at
  London’s White Cube gallery.

For related material, see
Log24, March 24-26, and
the entries culminating
on Pi Day.

Thursday, April 7, 2005

Thursday April 7, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:26 PM

In the Details

Wallace Stevens,
An Ordinary Evening in New Haven:

XXII

Professor Eucalyptus said, “The search
For reality is as momentous as
The search for God.”  It is the philosopher’s search
For an interior made exterior
And the poet’s search for the same exterior made
Interior….

   … Likewise to say of the evening star,
The most ancient light in the most ancient sky,
That it is wholly an inner light, that it shines
From the sleepy bosom of the real, re-creates,
Searches a possible for its possibleness.

Julie Taymor, “Skewed Mirrors” interview:

“… they were performing for God. Now God can mean whatever you want it to mean. But for me, I understood it so totally. The detail….

They did it from the inside to the outside. And from the outside to the in. And that profoundly moved me then. It was…it was the most important thing that I ever experienced.”

“Skewed Mirrors”
illustrated:

Click on the above to enlarge.

Details:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050407-Messick2.png” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

The above may be of interest to students
of  iconology — what Dan Brown in
The Da Vinci Code calls “symbology” —
and of redheads.

The artist of Details,
“Brenda Starr” creator
Dale Messick, died on Tuesday,
April 5, 2005, at 98.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050407-Messick.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
AP Photo
Dale Messick in 1982

For further details on
April 5, see
Art History:
The Pope of Hope


Thursday April 7, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM
Nine is a Vine

“Heaven is a state,
a sort of metaphysical state.”
— John O’Hara, Hope of Heaven, 1938

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/HopeOfHeaven1938.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

 “Mathematical realism holds that mathematical entities exist independently of the human mind.  Thus humans do not invent mathematics, but rather discover it, and any other intelligent beings in the universe would presumably do the same. The term Platonism is used because such a view is seen to parallel Plato’s belief in a “heaven of ideas”, an unchanging ultimate reality that the everyday world can only imperfectly approximate. Plato’s view probably derives from Pythagoras, and his followers the Pythagoreans, who believed that the world was, quite literally, built up by the numbers. This idea may have even older origins that are unknown to us.” — Wikipedia

Amen.

Related material:

In memory of Jesus of Nazareth,
the “true vine,”
who, some historians believe,
died on this date:

The Crucifixion of John O’Hara.

In memory of the Anti-Vine:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/DayOfTheLocust.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

See Dogma and
Heaven, Hell,
and Hollywood.
 
Related material:

The Usual Suspects

and

Thursday, December 26, 2002:

Holly for Miss Quinn 

Tonight’s site music is for Stephen Dedalus
and Miss Quinn, courtesy of Eithne Ní Bhraonáin. 

Miss Quinn

Holly

Eithne

Thursday April 7, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 AM
ART WARS Toys

From Maureen Dowd’s New York Times column of June 9, 2002:

“The shape of the government is not as important as the policy of the government. If he makes the policy aggressive and pre-emptive, the president can conduct the war on terror from the National Gallery of Art.”

Last year’s suggested ART WARS toy:

     Wednesday, April 07, 2004

As a Little Child

Today’s birthdays:

Francis Ford Coppola and
Russell Crowe.

From MindfulGroup.com:

Welcome to our imaginative and inspiring toy catalog!

Today is Wednesday 7-April 2004. On this day in 30 Jesus crucified by Roman troops in Jerusalem (scholars’ estimate)

What you will discover in this site is what we have been able to find in our everlasting search for the most original, innovative, amusing and mind bending toys from around the world.

Have Fun.    

Coliseum Tell me more
Coliseum The Coliseum Builder Block System can be used to recreate the Roman Coliseum. Reenact ancient Gladiator matches and bring Ancient Rome into your home.


This year’s suggested ART WARS toy:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050407-MusicBox.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

To order, see the
Amazing Music Box & Gifts Company.

Wednesday, April 7, 2004

Wednesday April 7, 2004

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:00 PM

As a Little Child

Today’s birthdays:

Francis Ford Coppola and
Russell Crowe.

From MindfulGroup.com:

Welcome to our imaginative and inspiring toy catalog!

Today is Wednesday 7-April 2004. On this day in 30 Jesus crucified by Roman troops in Jerusalem (scholars’ estimate)

What you will discover in this site is what we have been able to find in our everlasting search for the most original, innovative, amusing and mind bending toys from around the world.

Have Fun.    

Coliseum Tell me more
Coliseum The Coliseum Builder Block System can be used to recreate the Roman Coliseum. Reenact ancient Gladiator matches and bring Ancient Rome into your home.

Wednesday April 7, 2004

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:30 AM

ART WARS:
Mother of Beauty

In memory of architect Pierre Koenig

Mother of Beauty: A Note on Modernism.

“… Case Study House #22 … was high drama — one in which the entire city becomes part of the architect’s composition. Approached along a winding street set high in the Hollywood Hills, the house first appears as a blank concrete screen. From here, the visitor steps out onto a concrete deck that overlooks a swimming pool. Just beyond it, the house’s living room — enclosed in a glass-and steel-frame — cantilevers out from the edge of the hill toward the horizon.

The house was immortalized in a now famous image taken by the architectural photographer Julius Shulman. In it, two women, clad in immaculate white cocktail dresses, are perched on the edge of their seats in the glass-enclosed living room, their pose suggesting a kind of sanitized suburban bliss. A night view of the city spreads out beneath them, an endless grid of twinkling lights that perfectly captures the infinite hopes of the postwar American dream….

    “My blue dream…”  
— F. Scott Fitzgerald

Perhaps no house, in fact, better sums up the mix of outward confidence and psychic unease that defined Cold War America….”

Los Angeles Times, Nicolai Ouroussoff

Monday, April 7, 2003

Monday April 7, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:59 PM

Math Awareness Month

April is Math Awareness Month.
This year's theme is "mathematics and art."


 

Monday April 7, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:17 PM

An Offer He Couldn't Refuse

Today's birthday:  Francis Ford Coppola is 64.

"There is a pleasantly discursive treatment
of Pontius Pilate's unanswered question
'What is truth?'."


— H. S. M. Coxeter, 1987, introduction to Richard J. Trudeau's remarks on the "Story Theory" of truth as opposed to the "Diamond Theory" of truth in The Non-Euclidean Revolution

 

From a website titled simply Sinatra:

"Then came From Here to Eternity. Sinatra lobbied hard for the role, practically getting on his knees to secure the role of the street smart punk G.I. Maggio. He sensed this was a role that could revive his career, and his instincts were right. There are lots of stories about how Columbia Studio head Harry Cohn was convinced to give the role to Sinatra, the most famous of which is expanded upon in the horse's head sequence in The Godfather. Maybe no one will know the truth about that. The one truth we do know is that the feisty New Jersey actor won the Academy Award as Best Supporting Actor for his work in From Here to Eternity. It was no looking back from then on."

From a note on geometry of April 28, 1985:


 

Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Abschattungen*

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:00 PM

“… I realized that to me, Gödel and Escher and Bach
were only shadows cast in different directions
by some central solid essence.
I tried to reconstruct the central object . . . ."

— Douglas Hofstadter (1979)

See also posts of July 23, 2007, and April 7, 2018.

* Term from a visual-culture lexicon —

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Bosch House

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:00 PM

Continued from Music Box – The Theory (April 21)
in memory of jazz enthusiast Ann Sneed,
who reportedly died in Las Vegas at 87 on that date.

Hollywood homicide detective Harry Bosch at home.

See also Mother of Beauty (April 7, 2004).

Sunday, April 16, 2017

Risen?

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:00 PM

In memory of a mathematician who
reportedly died at 64 on April 4 

Part I: A review by that mathematician — 

Part II: The mathematician's funeral —

"Funeral service will be held at 1:30 p.m. on Friday, April 7, 2017 . . . ."
— See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/dispatch/
obituary.aspx?n=David-Mark-Goss&pid=184946410

This journal at 1:37 p.m. ET on Friday, April 7, 2017 —

Related material:
The previous post and posts tagged The Gray Legacy.

Saturday, April 8, 2017

Eye

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:24 PM

"I guess I found my future through Billy Name’s eye.
I saw his pictures of the Warhol Factory when I was
in college and thought, 'Oh that’s the place to get to.
Everyone is so beautiful and it looks brilliant and
complicated – art, music, film, but most of all a kind
of wild life.' It looked like the future as I imagined it."

The late Glenn O'Brien in The Guardian
     
on November 8, 2014.  O'Brien reportedly
     died at 70 yesterday, Friday (April 7) morning,
     in Manhattan.

"… through Billy Name's eye …."
Then there is Kurt Seligmann's eye

The above-mentioned Billy Name appeared in this journal
in July 2016  in the post "Coterie (for Philip Rieff)." Also
featured in that post was artist Kurt Seligmann.

A Google Search sidebar on Seligmann today:

Synchronology check of this  journal on the above Guardian  date:

Saturday, November 8, 2014

At 11:59*

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:59 PM 

Fantasy and the Buffered Self.”

*For the title, see Enormous Changes.

See also an 11:59 PM ET post on Thursday, April 6, titled
"Where Entertainment Is God (continues)."

Some related entertainment:

I do not recommend any of the above entertainments,
but they do supply some background for the article
"Fantasy and the Buffered Self" (which is  recommended.)

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Ultima Thule

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:30 PM

"Skip the preface, and it's in the bag!"

— Character in a short story by Nabokov,
"Ultima Thule," in The New Yorker  of April 7, 1973

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Narratives

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 1:00 PM

The novel Blood on Snow , set in Oslo, was published
by Knopf on April 7, 2015.  This journal on that date —

Log24 on Tuesday, April 7, 2015

Logic

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:00 PM 

Seven years ago in this journal —

The above links:  the Stone,  the rules.

A related image —

Thursday, April 7, 2016

Plan 9 Continues (Very Slowly)

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:00 PM

From the American Mathematical Society today —

Verena Huber-Dyson (1923-2016) 
Thursday April 7th 2016

Huber-Dyson, who worked in group theory and logic, died March 12 at the age of 92. She was born to Swiss parents in Naples and grew up in Athens but moved with her family to Switzerland in 1940 because of the war. Huber-Dyson received her PhD from the University of Zurich in 1947 and moved to the U.S. in 1948 for a post-doctoral fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Study. She held positions at many universities around the world and taught courses on the foundation of mathematics as a philosophy professor at the University of Calgary from 1973 to 1988. Her son, George Dyson, said that her last words were, "This will all go smoothly. Let's get going." She was an AMS member since 1949. Read more about her life.      

See also Huber-Dyson in this  journal.

Thursday, January 7, 2016

Point Omega…

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:32 AM

Continues. See previous episodes.

See as well

The above image is from April 7, 2003.

Monday, April 27, 2015

Hell’s Kitchen

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:18 AM

A heavenly image from yesterday's
Sunday Dinner  link "milestone award"—

An Oprah-related quote from the Tuesday, April 7,
ceremonial dedication of the Maya Angelou stamp—

“They say Easter was Sunday, but we are still
having church,” promised MSNBC talk show
host Melissa Harris-Perry, the ceremony’s emcee…."

In that spirit … a different sort of kitchen —

The Scholarly Kitchen —

Monday, April 20, 2015

Immaculate Inception

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:38 PM

Continued from a post of April 10, 2015 —

  
Maya Angelou stamp with
misattributed quote and 
Oprah on April 7, 2015

Trailer for "Welcome to Me" published on Feb. 23, 2015 —

Related material:  Manifest O  (April 1, 2015).

Saturday, April 18, 2015

The Acme Corporation Presents…

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:45 AM

Kyle Smith on April 15 in the New York Post —

"The ludicrous action thriller 'Beyond the Reach'
fails to achieve the Southwestern noir potency
of 'No Country for Old Men,' but there’s no denying
it brings to mind another Southwestern classic
about malicious pursuit: the Road Runner cartoons."

Related material: 

  1. Legespiel  Meets Würfelspiel  in…
    Gift of the Third Kind
    (April 7, 2007), featuring Ellen Yi-Luen Do —

    Reinventing Froebel's Gifts

  2. the current home page of Ellen Yi-Luen Do,
    now at Georgia Tech, and…
  3. a page about her ACME Lab —

Welcome to ACME lab!
A Creativity Machine Environment!
aka ACME Creativity Machine Environment –
ACME Lab

Yes, the name is both confusing and has
many meanings. We like the acronym of ACME,
since it means the highest point, and also refers to
the fictional company in Looney Tunes, which is
A Company that Makes Everything!

We call it ACME Creativity Machine Environment –
yes, the acronym of this is ACME.

We like recursive ideas.

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Translation

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:27 PM

From an informative April 7 essay in The Nation —

In his marvelous book Is That a Fish in Your Ear?: Translation and the Meaning of Everything , David Bellos demonstrates many of the ways that translation is not only possible but ubiquitous, so thoroughly woven into the fabric of our daily lives—from classrooms to international financial markets, from instruction manuals to poems—that if translation were somehow to become impossible, the world would descend into the zombie apocalypse faster than you can say “je ne sais quoi ."

— "Forensic Translation," by Benjamin Paloff

See also searches in this  journal for Core and for Kernel.
See as well Fabric Design and Symplectic.

Thursday, February 7, 2013

Mathematics and Narrative, continued…

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:01 PM

Primes Are Forever

"If diamonds are a girl's best friend,
prime numbers are a mathematician's….

A Mersenne prime is of the form 2P-1,
where the variable P is itself a prime—
making the Mersenne an elite sort of prime,
a James Bond among spies."

— Anonymous author at
    Fox News, Feb. 5, 2013

The author notes that the smaller
Mersenne primes include 7.

Related Material

April 7, 2003:

April is Math Awareness Month.

This year's theme is "mathematics and art."

Mathematics and Art: Totentanz from Seventh Seal

Update of 2:56 PM Feb. 7:

See also Paul Bateman and, in this journal, the date of Bateman's death.

For mathematics rather than narrative, see (for instance)

.

Thursday, August 30, 2012

The Cruelest Month

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:08 AM

Last night's 10 PM post linked to an April 7, 2012,
post that through a series of further links leads
to Columbia Film Theory .

For other film-related remarks, by a
Columbia alumnus,* see last night's post.

See also the 1.3 MB image from Aug. 16, the night 
of Elvis's Wrap Party. An excerpt from that image
stars Amy Adams—

Images, including the late Richard Zanuck

For Amy, from the current New Yorker

The Master

* N.O.C.D.

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

It’s 10 PM…

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:00 PM

Do you know where your children are?

Continued from Plan 9 , a Log24 post of  9 PM Monday

See another weblog's April 7, 2012, post on
God and Horror Movies.

See also this  weblog's post on that date.

Friday, April 13, 2012

The Primate and the Bee

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 AM

George Steiner —

"Man is, in Lévi-Strauss's view, a mythopoetic primate
(it's a difficult phrase but we don't have a better one)…."

Wikipedia —

"Primate is a title or rank bestowed on some bishops in certain Christian churches." 

Pope Benedict XVI at the 2012 Easter Vigil on April 7 —

"The great hymn of the Exsultet, which the deacon sings at the beginning of the Easter liturgy, points us quite gently towards a further aspect. It reminds us that this object, the candle, has its origin in the work of bees. So the whole of creation plays its part. In the candle, creation becomes a bearer of light.

But in the mind of the Fathers, the candle also in some sense contains a silent reference to the Church. The cooperation of the living community of believers in the Church in some way resembles the activity of bees. It builds up the community of light."

http://twitter.com/#!/skdh —

Sabine Hossenfelder's (Bee's) Easter Tweet

Thursday, May 26, 2011

Life’s Persistent Questions

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:01 PM

This afternoon's online New York Times  reviews "The Tree of Life," a film that opens tomorrow.

With disarming sincerity and daunting formal sophistication “The Tree of Life” ponders some of the hardest and most persistent questions, the kind that leave adults speechless when children ask them. In this case a boy, in whispered voice-over, speaks directly to God, whose responses are characteristically oblique, conveyed by the rustling of wind in trees or the play of shadows on a bedroom wall. Where are you? the boy wants to know, and lurking within this question is another: What am I doing here?

Persistent answers… Perhaps conveyed by wind, perhaps by shadows, perhaps by the New York Lottery.

For the nihilist alternative— the universe arose by chance out of nothing and all is meaningless— see Stephen Hawking and Jennifer Ouellette.

Update of 10:30 PM EDT May 26—

Today's NY Lottery results: Midday 407, Evening 756. The first is perhaps about the date April 7, the second about the phrase "three bricks shy"— in the context of the number 759 and the Miracle Octad Generator. (See also Robert Langdon and The Poetics of Space.)

Tuesday, May 3, 2011

24-Part Invention

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:33 AM

IMAGE- The 24-drawer filing cabinet of Lucia St. Clair Robson

"Next to the bookcase stands a wooden cabinet with 24 drawers that looks like something you might have seen in a library decades ago, or perhaps in an old apothecary. The drawers are marked with the names of her novels or characters in the novels and crammed with indexed notes.

She pulls open a drawer marked 'Lozen,' the name of a main female character in another historical western novel, 'The Ghost Warrior,' and reads a few of the index tabs: 'social relationships, puberty, death, quotes….'"

— From an article on Lucia St. Clair Robson in The Baltimore Sun  by Arthur Hirsch, dated 1:31 p.m. EDT April 30, 2011*

From this  journal later that same day

IMAGE- Sabato on his own tombstone in 'Angel of Darkness'

Robson's most recent novel is Last Train from Cuernavaca .

"A corpse will be transported by express!"

— Malcolm Lowry, Under the Volcano

* Update of 5:48 AM EDT May 3—
   The same article was also published with a different  dateline— April 28.
   Enthusiasts of synchronicity may lament the confusion, or they may
   turn to April 28 in this journal for a different  24-part invention.
   See also Art Wars, April 7, 2003 and White Horse .

Monday, May 2, 2011

The Vine*

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM

See "Nine is a Vine" and "Hereafter" in this journal.

IMAGE- Matt Damon and the perception of doors in 'Hereafter'

As quoted here last October 23

Margaret Atwood on Lewis Hyde's Trickster Makes This World: Mischief, Myth, and Art

"Trickster is among other things the gatekeeper who opens the door into the next world; those who mistake him for a psychopath never even know such a door exists." (159)

What is "the next world"? It might be the Underworld….

The pleasures of fabulation, the charming and playful lie– this line of thought leads Hyde to the last link in his subtitle, the connection of the trickster to art. Hyde reminds us that the wall between the artist and that American favourite son, the con-artist, can be a thin one indeed; that craft and crafty rub shoulders; and that the words artifice, artifact, articulation  and art  all come from the same ancient root, a word meaning "to join," "to fit," and "to make." (254)  If it’s a seamless whole you want, pray to Apollo, who sets the limits within which such a work can exist.  Tricksters, however, stand where the door swings open on its hinges and the horizon expands: they operate where things are joined together, and thus can also come apart.

* April 7, 2005

Friday, April 15, 2011

The Enchanted Sequel

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:29 PM

Today's mid-day NY lottery number was 407. See April 7 in this journal.

The sequel—Today's evening NY lottery number was 930. See Castle Rock.

Thursday, April 7, 2011

Awake in Seattle

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:02 PM

From University Book Store, Seattle, Washington—

http://www.log24.com/noindex-pdf/110407-GarberAndShields.jpg

Related material—

The Use and Abuse
of Donnie Darko

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110407-SourceCodeTrailer.jpg

Scene from a film based on the old SF story 'Mimsy Were the Borogoves'

From a page on Reality Hunger: A Manifesto  at DavidShields.com—

"The book's epigraph is a statement from Picasso: 'All art is theft.'"

Update of 3 PM EDT April 7

"… we get inspiration from everywhere, and there's a bright line between inspiration and slavish imitation. (I was going to throw in the Picasso quote 'All art is theft' here, but I've looked that up in both the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (and the Oxford Dictionary of Modern Quotations, just in case) and in the new Yale Book of Quotations, and can't find it. So I'll just have to steal without the glamour of Picasso having said it was okay.)"

Weblog post by Erin McKean

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Architecture Continued

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 10:00 AM

Yesterday's architectural entertainment coincided, more or less, with the New York Times  article "The Hand of a Master Architect" (Online Sunday, Aug. 8, and in the print edition Monday, Aug. 9).

A search for some background on that architect (Philip Johnson, not Howard Roark) showed that the Art Libraries Society of North America published a notable graphic logo in 2005—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/100810-ARLISlogoSm.jpg

See this journal on April 7, 2005, for a related graphic design.

The ARLIS/NA 2005 page cited above says about Houston, Texas, that 

"Just beyond the museum district lies Rice University, the city's most prestigious and oldest college….

Other campuses that contain significant architecture include St. Thomas University where Philip Johnson has made his mark for a period that extends more than forty years."

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/100810-Chapel.jpg

University of St. Thomas, Chapel of St. Basil

Applying Jungian synchronicity, we note that Johnson designed the Chapel of St. Basil at the University of St. Thomas, that the traditional date of the Feast of St. Basil is June 14, and that this journal on that date contained the following, from the aforementioned Rice University—                          

… a properly formulated Principle of Sufficient Reason plays
a fundamental role in scientific thought and, furthermore, is
to be regarded as of the greatest suggestiveness from the
philosophic point of view.2

… metaphysical reasoning always relies on the Principle of
Sufficient Reason, and… the true meaning of this Principle
is to be found in the “Theory of Ambiguity” and in the associated
mathematical “Theory of Groups.”

If I were a Leibnizian mystic, believing in his “preestablished
harmony,” and the “best possible world” so satirized by Voltaire
in “Candide,” I would say that the metaphysical importance of
the Principle of Sufficient Reason and the cognate Theory of Groups
arises from the fact that God thinks multi-dimensionally3
whereas men can only think in linear syllogistic series, and the
Theory of Groups is the appropriate instrument of thought to
remedy our deficiency in this respect.

The founder of the Theory of Groups was the mathematician
Evariste Galois….

2 As far as I am aware, only Scholastic Philosophy has fully recognized
  and exploited this principle as one of basic importance for philosophic thought.

3 That is, uses multi-dimensional symbols beyond our grasp.

George David Birkhoff, 1940

For more about Scholastic Philosophy, see the Center for Thomistic Studies at the University of St. Thomas.

For more about the graphic symbol shown (as above) by ARLIS and by Log24 in April 2005, see in this journal "rature sous rature ."

Wednesday, April 7, 2010

Veritas

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 AM

Some historians consider today's date, April 7, to be the date of the Crucifixion in the Roman calendar (a solar calendar, as opposed to the Jewish lunar scheme).

Since the ninefold square has been called both a symbol of Apollo and the matrix of a cross, it will serve as an icon for today–

The 3x3 square

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051202-Cross.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Adapted from
Ad Reinhardt

Friday, September 4, 2009

Friday September 4, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:02 PM
Closing the Circle

Continued from Monday

“This is a chapel 
 of mischance;
ill luck betide it, ’tis
the cursedest kirk
  that ever I came in!”

Philip Kennicott on
Kirk Varnedoe in
The Washington Post:

“Varnedoe’s lectures were
ultimately about faith,
about his faith in
the power of abstraction,
 and abstraction as a kind of
    anti-religious faith in itself….”

Kennicott’s remarks were
 on Sunday, May 18, 2003.
They were subtitled
“Closing the Circle
on Abstract Art.”

Also on Sunday, May 18, 2003:

 “Will the circle be unbroken?
  As if some southern congregation
  is praying we will come to understand.”


Princeton University Press
:

Empty canvas on cover of Varnedoe's 'Pictures of Nothing'

See also

Parmiggiani’s 
  Giordano Bruno

Parmiggiani's Bruno: empty canvas with sculpture of Durer's solid

Dürer’s Melencolia I

Durer, Melencolia I

and Log24 entries
of May 19-22, 2009,
ending with
    “Steiner System” —

Diamond-shaped face of Durer's 'Melencolia I' solid, with  four colored pencils from Diane Robertson Design

George Steiner on chess
(see yesterday morning):

“There are siren moments when quite normal creatures otherwise engaged, men such as Lenin and myself, feel like giving up everything– marriage, mortgages, careers, the Russian Revolution– in order to spend their days and nights moving little carved objects up and down a quadrate board.”

Steiner continues

“Allegoric associations of death with chess are perennial….”

Yes, they are.

April is Math Awareness Month.
This year’s theme is “mathematics and art.”

Mathematics and Art: Totentanz from Seventh Seal

Cf. both of yesterday’s entries.

Thursday, July 16, 2009

Thursday July 16, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:00 PM
 
Mother of Beauty
continued from
April 7, 2004

In memory of Julius Shulman,
architectural photographer,
who died last night:

"And the lotos rose, quietly, quietly,
  The surface glittered out of heart of light…"

Four Quartets, quoted here
November 22, 2004

Photo by Gerry Gantt, and the Jewel in Venn's Lotus

"… as in the hearth and heart of light." 

Delmore Schwartz   

(See previous entry.)

Sunday, April 12, 2009

Sunday April 12, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:09 AM
Where Entertainment
Is God
, continued

Dialogue from the classic film Forbidden Planet

“… Which makes it a gilt-edged priority that one of us gets into that Krell lab and takes that brain boost.”

— Taken from a video (5:18-5:24 of 6:09) at David Lavery’s weblog in the entry of Tuesday, April 7.

(Cf. this journal on that date.)

Thanks to Professor Lavery for his detailed notes on his viewing experiences.

My own viewing recently included, on the night of Good Friday, April 10, the spiritually significant film Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull.

The mystic circle of 13 aliens at the end of that film, together with Leslie Nielsen’s Forbidden Planet remark quoted above, suggests the following:

“The aim of Conway’s game M13 is to get the hole at the top point and all counters in order 1,2,…,12 when moving clockwise along the circle.” —Lieven Le Bruyn

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09/090411-M13.gif

The illustration is from the weblog entry by Lieven Le Bruyn quoted below. The colored circles represent 12 of the 13 projective points described below, the 13 radial strokes represent the 13 projective lines, and the straight lines in the picture, including those that form the circle, describe which projective points are incident with which projective lines. The dot at top represents the “hole.”

From “The Mathieu Group M12 and Conway’s M13-Game” (pdf), senior honors thesis in mathematics by Jeremy L. Martin under the supervision of Professor Noam D. Elkies, Harvard University, April 1, 1996–

“Let P3 denote the projective plane of order 3. The standard construction of P3 is to remove the zero point from a three-dimensional vector space over the field F3 and then identify each point x with -x, obtaining a space with (33 – 1)/2 = 13 points. However, we will be concerned only with the geometric properties of the projective plane. The 13 points of P3 are organized into 13 lines, each line containing four points. Every point lies on four lines, any two points lie together on a unique line, and any two lines intersect at a unique point….

Conway [3] proposed the following game…. Place twelve numbered counters on the points… of P3 and leave the thirteenth point… blank. (The empty point will be referred to throughout as the “hole.”) Let the location of the hole be p; then a primitive move of the game consists of selecting one of the lines containing the hole, say {p, q, r, s}. Move the counter on q to p (thus moving the hole to q), then interchange the counters on r and s….

There is an obvious characterization of a move as a permutation in S13, operating on the points of P3. By limiting our consideration to only those moves which return the hole to its starting point…. we obtain the Conway game group. This group, which we shall denote by GC, is a subgroup of the symmetric group S12 of permutations of the twelve points…, and the group operation of GC is concatenation of paths. Conway [3] stated, but did not prove explicitly, that GC is isomorphic to the Mathieu group M12. We shall subsequently verify this isomorphism.

The set of all moves (including those not fixing the hole) is given the name M13 by Conway. It is important that M13 is not a group….”

[3] John H. Conway, “Graphs and Groups and M13,” Notes from New York Graph Theory Day XIV (1987), pp. 18–29.


Another exposition (adapted to Martin’s notation) by Lieven le Bruyn (see illustration above):

“Conway’s puzzle M13 involves the 13 points and 13 lines of P3. On all but one point numbered counters are placed holding the numbers 1,…,12 and a move involves interchanging one counter and the ‘hole’ (the unique point having no counter) and interchanging the counters on the two other points of the line determined by the first two points. In the picture [above] the lines are represented by dashes around the circle in between two counters and the points lying on this line are those that connect to the dash either via a direct line or directly via the circle. In the first part we saw that the group of all reachable positions in Conway’s M13 puzzle having the hole at the top position contains the sporadic simple Mathieu group M12 as a subgroup.”

For the religious significance of the circle of 13 (and the “hole”), consider Arthur and the 12 knights of the round table, et cetera.

But seriously…
 
Delmore Schwartz, 'Starlight Like Intuition Pierced the Twelve'

Thursday, April 9, 2009

Thursday April 9, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:12 AM
Bright Star
continued from
March 28, 2003

Mathematician Leonard Gillman, co-author of 'Rings of Continuous Functions,' died on April 7, 2009

Related material:

One Ring to
Rule Them All

(Sept. 2, 2003)
and
Indiana Jones and the
Diadem of Death

(May 29, 2008)

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Tuesday March 10, 2009

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:26 AM
Language Game

“Music, mathematics, and chess are in vital respects dynamic acts of location. Symbolic counters are arranged in significant rows. Solutions, be they of a discord, of an algebraic equation, or of a positional impasse, are achieved by a regrouping, by a sequential reordering of individual units and unit-clusters (notes, integers, rooks or pawns). The child-master, like his adult counterpart, is able to visualize in an instantaneous yet preternaturally confident way how the thing should look several moves hence. He sees the logical, the necessary harmonic and melodic argument as it arises out of an initial key relation or the preliminary fragments of a theme. He knows the order, the appropriate dimension, of the sum or geometric figure before he has performed the intervening steps. He announces mate in six because the victorious end position, the maximally efficient configuration of his pieces on the board, lies somehow ‘out there’ in graphic, inexplicably clear sight of his mind….”

“… in some autistic enchantment, pure as one of Bach’s inverted canons or Euler’s formula for polyhedra.”

— George Steiner, “A Death of Kings,” in The New Yorker, issue dated Sept. 7, 1968

Related material:

“Classrooms are filled with discussions not of the Bible and Jesus but of 10 ‘core values’– perseverance and curiosity, for instance– that are woven into the curriculum.”

— “Secular Education, Catholic Values,” by Javier C. Hernandez, The New York Times, Sunday, March 8, 2009

“… There was a problem laid out on the board, a six-mover. I couldn’t solve it, like a lot of my problems. I reached down and moved a knight…. I looked down at the chessboard. The move with the knight was wrong. I put it back where I had moved it from. Knights had no meaning in this game. It wasn’t a game for knights.”


— Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep

The Chandler quotation appears in “Language Game,” an entry in this journal on April 7, 2008.

Some say the “Language Game” date, April 7, is the true date (fixed, permanent) of the Crucifixion– by analogy, Eliot’s “still point” and Jung’s “centre.” (See yesterday, noon.)

Thursday, April 10, 2008

Thursday April 10, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:29 AM
The Date

A Xanga footprint this morning–

France /283018943/item.html? 4/10/2008 8:14 AM

This links to an entry
containing the following:

Date: June 13, 2005

Related material:
A Mass for Lucero.

That web page concludes with a reference to esthetics and a Delian palm, and was written three years ago on this date.

Today [June 13] is also the date of death for Martin Buber, philosophical Jew.

Here is a Delphic saying in memory of Buber:

“It is the female date that is considered holy, and that bears fruit.”

—  Steven Erlanger,
    New York Times story,
    dateline Jerusalem, June 11

This, together with the online
New York Times obituaries
pictured here on April 7,
suggests further consideration
of a female date…. namely,
that of a Log24 entry,

A Yahrzeit for Virginia Woolf,

from March 28
(the date of Woolf’s death).

March 28 this year was also
the date of death of another
female author,

Helen Bassine Yglesias
.

Helen Yglesias in 2000

Click on the image
for a larger picture
and further details.

“Attention must
  be paid.”
Linda Loman 

Friday, January 4, 2008

Friday January 4, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:02 AM
The Harvest Continues

The “greatest generation” theme from Art Wars– April 7, 2003 continues in two obituaries from this morning’s New York Times:

NY Times obituaries: painter Michael Goldberg, military historian Gerald Astor

The first obituary says that Goldberg

“saw abstract painting… as ‘still the primary visual challenge of our time. It might get harder and harder to make an abstract image that’s believable, but I think that just makes the challenge greater.'”  The Times says that Goldberg was a veteran of Merrill’s Marauders in World War II (as well as of the last century’s art wars).

The second obituary notes that Astor’s books include A Blood-Dimmed Tide (a phrase from Yeats)– an account of the Battle of the Bulge– and a biography of Dr. Josef Mengele.

Both men died on Sunday, December 30, 2007. From Log24 on that date, an abstract image and a cinematic portrait of Dr. Mengele:

Fahne,
S. H. Cullinane,
Aug. 15, 2003

Dr. Mengele,
according to
Hollywood

Related material:

Yesterday’s entry
The Revelation Game
and an entry of April 7, 2003:

April is Math Awareness Month.
This year’s theme is “mathematics and art.”

(The art, by Ingmar Bergman, was
in honor of the April 7 birthday of
Francis Ford Coppola, director of
“Apocalypse Now.”)

Monday, July 30, 2007

Monday July 30, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:59 AM
Structure

Illustration from
Log24, April 7, 2003:

April is Math Awareness Month.
This year’s theme is “mathematics and art.”

Mathematics and Art

Illustration from
this morning’s
New York Times:

NYT obituaries for Ingmar Bergman, Odile Crick, on July 30, 2007

Illustration from
the journal Nature, 1953:

Odile Crick, illustration of DNA structure, 1953

Saturday, June 23, 2007

Saturday June 23, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 AM
Faust in Copenhagen:
 
A Struggle for
the Soul of Physics

By Gino Segrè

Illustrated. 310 pp.
Viking. $25.95.

 The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/FaustInCopenhagen.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Review in the June 24
New York Times Book Review:

“As though their knowledge of the quantum secrets came with the power of prophecy, some three dozen of Europe’s best physicists ended their 1932 meeting in Copenhagen with a parody of Goethe’s ‘Faust.’….

It was only in retrospect that the silliness became profound. The players were becoming possessors of ‘a truth with implicit powers of good and evil,’ Gino Segrè writes in ‘Faust in Copenhagen,’ his inventive new book about the era. And ‘the devil… was in the details.'” –George Johnson

Related material:

This week’s entries
on Pauli and Faust,
the entries of
  June 3 through June 6,
and the five entries
ending on April 7, 2005,
with “In the Details

Saturday, May 12, 2007

Saturday May 12, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:07 AM
Artistic Vision

Last night's entry "A Midrash for Hollywood" discussed a possible interpretation of yesterday's Pennsylvania Lottery numbers– mid-day 384, evening 952.

In memory of a blacklisted Hollywood screenwriter who died yesterday, here is another interpretation of those numbers.

First, though, it seems appropriate to quote again the anonymous source from "Heaven, Hell, and Hollywood" on screenwriters– "You can be replaced by some Ping Pong balls and a dictionary."  An example was given illustrating this saying.  Here is another example:

Yesterday's PA lottery numbers in the dictionary–

Webster's New World Dictionary,
College Edition, 1960–

Page 384: "Defender of the Faith"
Related Log24 entries:
"To Announce a Faith," Halloween 2006,
and earlier Log24 entries from
that year's Halloween season

Page 952: "monolith"
Related Log24 entries:
"Shema, Israel," and "Punch Line"
(with the four entries that preceded it).

It may not be entirely irrelevant that a headline in last night's entry– "Lonesome No More!"– was linked to a discussion of Kurt Vonnegut's Slapstick, that a film version of that novel starred Jerry Lewis, and that yesterday afternoon's entry quoted a vision of "an Ingmar Bergman script as directed by Jerry Lewis."

 

See also April 7, 2003:

 

April is Math Awareness Month.
This year's theme is "mathematics and art."

"Art isn't easy."
— Stephen Sondheim    

Sunday, January 7, 2007

Sunday January 7, 2007

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Thursday, April 7, 2005  7:26 PM

In the Details

Wallace Stevens,
An Ordinary Evening in New Haven:

XXII

Professor Eucalyptus said, “The search
For reality is as momentous as
The search for God.”  It is the philosopher’s search
For an interior made exterior
And the poet’s search for the same exterior made
Interior….

   … Likewise to say of the evening star,
The most ancient light in the most ancient sky,
That it is wholly an inner light, that it shines
From the sleepy bosom of the real, re-creates,
Searches a possible for its possibleness.

Julie Taymor, “Skewed Mirrors” interview:

“… they were performing for God. Now God can mean whatever you want it to mean. But for me, I understood it so totally. The detail….

They did it from the inside to the outside. And from the outside to the in. And that profoundly moved me then. It was…it was the most important thing that I ever experienced.”

“Skewed Mirrors”
illustrated:


Click on the above to enlarge.

Details:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050407-Messick2.png” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

The above may be of interest to students
of  iconology — what Dan Brown in
The Da Vinci Code calls “symbology” —
and of redheads.

The artist of Details,
“Brenda Starr” creator
Dale Messick, died on Tuesday,
April 5, 2005, at 98.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050407-Messick.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
AP Photo
Dale Messick in 1982

For further details on
April 5, see
Art History:
The Pope of Hope

Thursday, August 31, 2006

Thursday August 31, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:09 PM
Wag the Dogma
(continued from 2001)
Ingrid Thulin and
Glenn Ford in
“The 4 Horsemen
of the Apocalypse”:

The 4 Horsemen, Ingrid Thulin, Glenn Ford

A sneering review from TIME Magazine, March 23, 1962:

“Hero Ford, a playboy from Argentina, falls pampassionately in love with Heroine Thulin, a Parisienne married to a patriotic editor. When the editor joins the Resistance, the hero realizes his duty and secretly does the same. Unaware of his decision, the heroine decides that he is merely a lightweight, and goes back to her husband. At the fade, while the violins soar among the bomb bursts, the poor misunderstood playboy dies heroically in an attempt to weaken the Wehrmacht’s defenses in Normandy.

The tale is trite, the script clumsy, and the camera work grossly faked. Though the lovers wander all over Paris, the Cathedral of Notre Dame turns up in the background practically everywhere they go, almost as if it were following them around like a little dog.”

TIME Magazine is still wearing the Ivy League sneer it displayed so impressively in 1962.

A less dismissive summary from Answers.com:

“The World War I setting of the original Blasco-Ibanez novel has been updated to World War II, but the basic plot remains the same. A well-to-do Argentinian family, rent asunder by the death of patriarch Lee J. Cobb, scatters to different European countries in the late 1930s. Before expiring, Cobb had warned his nephew Carl Boehm that the latter’s allegiance to the Nazis would bring down the wrath of the titular Four Horsemen: War, Conquest, Famine and Death. Ford, Cobb’s grandson, has promised to honor his grandfather’s memory by thwarting the plans of Boehm. At the cost of his own life, Ford leads allied bombers to Boehm’s Normandy headquarters.”

In memory of Glenn Ford, a talented character actor who died at 90 yesterday, the opening paragraphs of an obituary in The Scotsman:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060831-ScotsmanLogo3.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Screen icon Glenn Ford
dies at 90

RHIANNON EDWARD

GLENN Ford, one of the most enduring stars of the silver screen, has died at the age of 90.

Ford, who appeared in more than 200 films in a career spanning five decades, died at his home in Beverly Hills.

The actor’s health had been in decline for a number of years after he suffered a series of strokes.

Although he never achieved the superstardom he craved, Ford was widely acclaimed as one of the best character actors in the business.

The business of narrative:

From a narrative suggested by the name of The Scotsman‘s reporter and related, if only by association with Normandy, to Ford’s “Four Horsemen” film:

“The Vandaleurs are a family of Norman nobles with a heritable version of the mages’ Gift. They have been using magic covertly for what appears to have been a very long time…. Another branch of the family is known to hold a fief in Normandy, but it is not yet known if they are covert magicians as well.”

The Vandaleur narrative may be of interest to fans of The Da Vinci Code. (Ford is said to have been a Freemason, a charter member of Riviera Lodge No. 780, Pacific Palisades, California.)

For Catholics and others who prefer more traditional narratives:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060831-4Horsemen.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

 Illuminated parchment,
1047 A.D.,
The Four Horsemen
of the Apocalypse

Related material:

Yesterday’s entries, and
an entry from April 7. 2003,
that they link to:

Mathematics and The Seventh Seal

Wednesday, August 30, 2006

Wednesday August 30, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:00 PM

Seven

“Research & Ideas” memo from Harvard Business School dated April 17, 2006:

“The word experience comes from the Latin words ex pericolo, which mean ‘from danger.'”

— Etymology by Professor Joseph Badaracco of Harvard University.  Badaracco gives no evidence for his dubious claim.

Related (if only temporally):
Easter Monday, April 17, 2006.

experience

1377, from O.Fr. experience, from L. experientia “knowledge gained by repeated trials,” from experientem (nom. experiens), prp. of experiri “to try, test,” from ex- “out of” + peritus “experienced, tested.” The v. (1533) first meant “to test, try;” sense of “feel, undergo” first recorded 1588.

      — Online Etymology Dictionary

The title of this entry refers to the time it was posted. Related references to seven: April 7, 2003, and today’s previous entry.

See also an entry from 2/29, 2004
(Leap Day and Oscar Night):

Vita Brevis

“In many ways, the arts are the highest achievements of man.”

— Harvard President
   Lawrence H. Summers,
   Feb. 26, 2004 

”We intensively train children in the Arts and ritual because deep down we know that these are the only things that really MATTER. This is what we must share first with the young, in case they DIE.”

— Lucy Ellmann, Dot in the Universe, quoted in today’s [2/29/04] New York Times

Harvard persons from parts of the university that are more scholarly than the Business School may sneer at the above-quoted Online Etymology Dictionary.  They can consult the following:

On “experience”

From J.L. Austin, From Ritual to Theatre: The Human Seriousness of Play:

“Scholars, such as Julius Pokorny (Indogermanisches Etymolgisches Worterbuch, 1959), trace ‘experience’ right back to hypothetical Indo-European base or root *per-, ‘to attempt, venture, risk,’ whence the Greek peira,”experience,” the source of our word ’empirical.’ It is also the verbal root which derives the Germanic *feraz, giving rise to Old English faer, “danger, sudden calamity,” whence Modern English ‘fear.’ Already, we see the ‘cognitive’ directions taken by * per-, through the Greek route, and affective ones, through the Germanic — which would have interested Dilthey, one may be sure! But more directly ‘experience’ derives, via Middle English and Old French, from the Latin experientia, denoting ‘trial, proof, experiment,’ itself generated from experiens, the present participle of experiri, ‘to try, test,’ from from ex-, ‘out’ + base per as in peritus, ‘experienced,’ ‘having learned by trying.’ The suffixed extended form of *per is peri-tlo-, whence the Latin periclum, periculum, “trial, danger, peril. Once more, we find experience linked with risk, straining towards ‘drama,’ crisis, rather than bland cognitive learning!”

“… Finally, ‘experiment,’ like ‘experience,’ is derived from Latin experiri “to try or test.” If we put these various senses together we have a ‘laminated’ semantic system focused on ‘experience,’ which portrays it as a journey, a test (of self, of suppositions about others), a ritual passage, an exposure to peril or risk, a source of fear. By means of experience, we ‘fare’ ‘fearfully’ through ‘perils,’ taking ‘experimental’ steps. …” (17-18)

The above is taken from an anonymous weblog entry.  The author of the entry identified the source as From Ritual to Theatre: The Human Seriousness of Play.  The author of the entry falsely stated that the author of this book was J. L. Austin.  In fact, the book was written by Victor Turner, apparently the same philosophical sociologist whom we encountered in the previous entry and in the Log24 entry for the recent feast of St. Max Black.  Turner may have been quoting Austin; pages from the book are not available online.  Another author, however, says the quotation is by Turner himself.  See Rena Fraden’s Imagining Medea, pp. 218-219.

Today’s previous entry is a sort of “ritual passage” for a Nobel Prize winner. For a ritual passage more directly related to Professor Badaracco, see the Brookline TAB obituary of his 23-year-old daughter, who died on Monday, August 21, 2006.  According to today’s online Harvard Crimson, “she was walking along Hammond Street in Newton [Mass.] when an 84-year-old driver jumped the curb and struck her.”

From her Brookline TAB obituary of Thursday, Aug. 24, 2006:

“Funeral services will be held Friday [Aug. 25, 2006] at 10 a.m. at St. Mary’s of the Assumption Church, at 67 Harvard St.

The family asks that in lieu of flowers, donations be made to the Centro Romero Community Center in Chicago: 6216 N. Clark St., Chicago, IL 60660.”

Tuesday, April 25, 2006

Tuesday April 25, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:35 AM
A Trinity
for Rebecca

(For Rebecca Goldstein of Trinity College)

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06/060425-Trinity.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Sources: today's New York Times
and the five Log24 entries ending
on the morning of April 7, 2006:

ART WARS
in Poetry Month

Of what use the above trinity
might be to Rebecca, I am unsure.

I find it helpful in traveling back to
a summer night on 52nd St. in 1948

Jazz clubs on 52nd St. in 1948

Saturday, April 8, 2006

Saturday April 8, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:07 PM

April 7 two years ago:

Welcome to our imaginative and inspiring toy catalog!

Today is Wednesday 7-April 2004. On this day in 30 Jesus crucified by Roman troops in Jerusalem (scholars’ estimate).

Friday, December 16, 2005

Friday December 16, 2005

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:00 PM
Jesus vs. the Goddess:
A Brief Chronology

In 1946, Robert Graves published King Jesus, an historical novel based on the theory and Graves’ own historical conjecture that Jesus was, in fact, the rightful heir to the Israelite throne… written while he was researching and developing his ideas for The White Goddess.”

In 1948, C. S. Lewis finished the first draft of The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe, a novel in which one of the main characters is “the White Witch.”

In 1948, Robert Graves published The White Goddess.

In 1949, Robert Graves published Seven Days in New Crete [also titled Watch the North Wind Rise], “a novel about a social distopia in which Goddess worship is (once again?) the dominant religion.”

Lewis died on November 22, 1963, the day John F. Kennedy was killed.

Related material:
Log24, December 10, 2005

Graves died on December 7 (Pearl Harbor Day), 1985.

Related material:
Log24, December 7, 2005, and
Log24, December 11, 2005

Jesus died, some say, on April 7 in the year 30 A.D.

Related material:

Art Wars, April 7, 2003:
Geometry and Conceptual Art,

Eight is a Gate, and

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051216-PlatoDiamond.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Plato’s Diamond

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051216-Motto.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

— Motto of
Plato’s Academy

“Plato is wary of all forms of rapture other than reason’s. He is most deeply leery of, because himself so susceptible to, the literary imagination. He speaks of it as a kind of holy madness or intoxication and goes on to link it to Eros, another derangement that joins us, but very dangerously, with the gods.”
 
Rebecca Goldstein in
    The New York Times,
    three years ago today
    (December 16, 2002) 
 
“It’s all in Plato, all in Plato;
 bless me, what do they
teach them at these schools?”
 
— C. S. Lewis in
the Narnia Chronicles

“How much story do you want?”
— George Balanchine

Tuesday, October 18, 2005

Tuesday October 18, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:07 AM

11:07:16

“Serious numbers
will always be heard.”
— Paul Simon (64 on Oct. 13)

“Her wallet’s filled with pictures.”
— Chuck Berry (79 today)

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051018-Atrani2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Collegiate Church of
St. Mary Magdalene,
Atrani, Amalfi Coast, Italy:
 
“An interior made exterior”
— Wallace Stevens

See In the Details
(Log24, April 7, 2005)
and Endgame
 (Log24, Nov. 7, 2002).

Picture sources:
Interior: Amalfi Coast
Exterior: Amalfi-kysten

Friday, July 1, 2005

Friday July 1, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:00 PM

Big Dreams

“For more than a century, Los Angeles has been synonymous with big dreams. The Australian writer and critic Clive James said it this way. ‘Call Los Angeles any dirty name you like… The fact remains that you are already living in it before you get there.'”

— Today’s inaugural address by Mayor Villaraigosa

See also the previous entry.

Update of 2:24 PM July 2:

Yesterday afternoon I picked up a copy of George Steiner’s Grammars of Creation I had ordered.  A check of Amazon.com to see what others had to say about this book yielded the following:

“Steiner’s account of Hope as something exclusively transcendental and relative to the future is poor and superficial: the person who hopes is not only walking ‘towards’ Eternal Life, but is already walking ‘in’ Eternal Life, walking the Kingdom.”

— Matías Cordero, Santiago, Chile

See also an entry of April 7, 2005, Nine is a Vine.

Friday, September 19, 2003

Friday September 19, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:57 AM

The Mysteries of 26

My entry of May 26, 2003 —

Many Dimensions — Why 26? 

dealt with the question of whether this number, said to be of significance (as a number of dimensions) in theoretical physics, has any purely mathematical properties of interest.

That entry contained the above figure, a so-called Levi graph illustrating point/line incidence in the finite projective plane with 13 points and 13 lines, PG(2,3).

It turns out that in a paper of April 7, 2000, John H. Conway and Christopher S. Simons discussed a close connection between this plane and the Monster group.  See

26 Implies the Bimonster 

(Journal of Algebra. Vol. 235, no. 2.
MR 2001k:20028).

Conway had written about such a connection as early as 1985.

I apologize for not knowing about this sooner, and so misleading any mathematical readers about the number 26, which it seems does have considerable purely mathematical significance.

Monday, September 8, 2003

Monday September 8, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:07 PM

Goodbye and Hello

Larry Rodgers
The Arizona Republic
Aug. 24, 2003 12:00 AM:

“If any musician can look death in the eye and smile, it’s California-based songwriter extraordinaire Warren Zevon.”

From April 7, 2003:

April is Math Awareness Month.
This year’s theme is “mathematics and art.”

From an entry yesterday on looking death in the eye and smiling:

Such serenity “is indestructible and only increases with age and nearness to death. It is the secret of beauty and the real substance of all art.”

Warren Zevon died yesterday.

From an entry earlier today on a circle of souls in the sun:

“they lovingly welcome two more into their company.”


Sun Tree
by
Terry Frost

Frost died on September 1.
The above picture by Frost is from

Modern British Artists.

Monday, August 18, 2003

Monday August 18, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 3:09 PM

Entries since Xanga’s
August 10 Failure:


Sunday, August 17, 2003  2:00 PM

A Thorny Crown of…

West Wing's Toby Ziegler

From the first episode of
the television series
The West Wing“:

 

Original airdate: Sept. 22, 1999
Written by Aaron Sorkin

MARY MARSH
That New York sense of humor. It always–

CALDWELL
Mary, there’s absolutely no need…

MARY MARSH
Please, Reverend, they think they’re so much smarter. They think it’s smart talk. But nobody else does.

JOSH
I’m actually from Connecticut, but that’s neither here nor there. The point is that I hope…

TOBY
She meant Jewish.

[A stunned silence. Everyone stares at Toby.]

TOBY (CONT.)
When she said “New York sense of humor,” she was talking about you and me.

JOSH
You know what, Toby, let’s just not even go there.

 

Going There, Part I

 

Crown of Ideas

Kirk Varnedoe, 57, art historian and former curator of the Museum of Modern Art, died Thursday, August 14, 2003.

From his New York Times obituary:

” ‘He loved life in its most tangible forms, and so for him art was as physical and pleasurable as being knocked down by a wave,’ said Adam Gopnik, the writer and a former student of his who collaborated on Mr. Varnedoe’s first big show at the Modern, ‘High & Low.’ ‘Art was always material first — it was never, ever bound by a thorny crown of ideas.’ ”

For a mini-exhibit of ideas in honor of Varnedoe, see

Fahne Hoch.

Verlyn Klinkenborg on Varnedoe:

“I was always struck by the tangibility of the words he used….  It was as if he were laying words down on the table one by one as he used them, like brushes in an artist’s studio. That was why students crowded into his classes and why the National Gallery of Art had overflow audiences for his Mellon Lectures earlier this year. Something synaptic happened when you listened to Kirk Varnedoe, and, remarkably, something synaptic happened when he listened to you. You never knew what you might discover together.”

Perhaps even a “thorny crown of ideas“?

“Crown of Thorns”
Cathedral, Brasilia

Varnedoe’s death coincided with
the Great Blackout of 2003.

“To what extent does this idea of a civic life produced by sense of adversity correspond to actual life in Brasília? I wonder if it is something which the city actually cultivates. Consider, for example the cathedral, on the monumental axis, a circular, concrete framed building whose sixteen ribs are both structural and symbolic, making a structure that reads unambiguously as a crown of thorns; other symbolic elements include the subterranean entrance, the visitor passing through a subterranean passage before emerging in the light of the body of the cathedral. And it is light, shockingly so….”

Modernist Civic Space: The Case of Brasilia, by Richard J. Williams, Department of History of Art, University of Edinburgh, Scotland

 

Going There, Part II

Simple, Bold, Clear

Art historian Kirk Varnedoe was, of course, not the only one to die on the day of the Great Blackout.

Claude Martel, 34, a senior art director of The New York Times Magazine, also died on Thursday, August 14, 2003.

Janet Froelich, the magazine’s art director, describes below a sample of work that she and Martel did together:

“A new world of ideas”

Froelich notes that “the elements are simple, bold, and clear.”

For another example of elements with these qualities, see my journal entry

Fahne Hoch.

The flag design in that entry
might appeal to Aaron Sorkin’s
Christian antisemite:

 

Fahne,
S. H. Cullinane,
Aug. 15, 2003

Dr. Mengele,
according to
Hollywood

 

Note that the elements of the flag design have the qualities described so aptly by Froelich– simplicity, boldness, clarity:

They share these qualities with the Elements of Euclid, a treatise on geometrical ideas.

For the manner in which such concepts might serve as, in Gopnik’s memorable phrase, a “thorny crown of ideas,” see

“Geometry for Jews” in

ART WARS: Geometry as Conceptual Art.

See also the discussion of ideas in my journal entry on theology and art titled

Understanding: On Death and Truth

and the discussion of the wordidea” (as well as the word, and the concept, “Aryan”) in the following classic (introduced by poet W. H. Auden):

 

 

Saturday, August 16, 2003  6:00 AM

Varnedoe’s Crown

Kirk Varnedoe, 57, art historian and former curator of the Museum of Modern Art, died Thursday, August 14, 2003.

From his New York Times obituary:

” ‘He loved life in its most tangible forms, and so for him art was as physical and pleasurable as being knocked down by a wave,’ said Adam Gopnik, the writer and a former student of his who collaborated on Mr. Varnedoe’s first big show at the Modern, ‘High & Low.’ ‘Art was always material first — it was never, ever bound by a thorny crown of ideas.’ “

For a mini-exhibit of ideas in honor of Varnedoe, see

Fahne Hoch. 

Verlyn Klinkenborg on Varnedoe:

“I was always struck by the tangibility of the words he used….  It was as if he were laying words down on the table one by one as he used them, like brushes in an artist’s studio. That was why students crowded into his classes and why the National Gallery of Art had overflow audiences for his Mellon Lectures earlier this year. Something synaptic happened when you listened to Kirk Varnedoe, and, remarkably, something synaptic happened when he listened to you. You never knew what you might discover together.”

Perhaps even a “thorny crown of ideas”?

“Crown of Thorns”
Cathedral, Brasilia

Varnedoe’s death coincided with
the Great Blackout of 2003.

“To what extent does this idea of a civic life produced by sense of adversity correspond to actual life in Brasília? I wonder if it is something which the city actually cultivates. Consider, for example the cathedral, on the monumental axis, a circular, concrete framed building whose sixteen ribs are both structural and symbolic, making a structure that reads unambiguously as a crown of thorns; other symbolic elements include the subterranean entrance, the visitor passing through a subterranean passage before emerging in the light of the body of the cathedral. And it is light, shockingly so….”

Modernist Civic Space: The Case of Brasilia, by Richard J. Williams, Department of History of Art, University of Edinburgh, Scotland


Friday, August 15, 2003  3:30 PM

ART WARS:

The Boys from Brazil

It turns out that the elementary half-square designs used in Diamond Theory

 

also appear in the work of artist Nicole Sigaud.

Sigaud’s website The ANACOM Project  has a page that leads to the artist Athos Bulcão, famous for his work in Brasilia.

From the document

Conceptual Art in an
Authoritarian Political Context:
Brasilia, Brazil
,

by Angélica Madeira:

“Athos created unique visual plans, tiles of high poetic significance, icons inseparable from the city.”

As Sigaud notes, two-color diagonally-divided squares play a large part in the art of Bulcão.

The title of Madeira’s article, and the remarks of Anna Chave on the relationship of conceptual/minimalist art to fascist rhetoric (see my May 9, 2003, entries), suggest possible illustrations for a more politicized version of Diamond Theory:

 

Fahne,
S. H. Cullinane,
Aug. 15, 2003

Dr. Mengele,
according to
Hollywood

 

Is it safe?

These illustrations were suggested in part by the fact that today is the anniversary of the death of Macbeth, King of Scotland, and in part by the following illustrations from my journal entries of July 13, 2003 comparing a MOMA curator to Lady Macbeth:

 

Die Fahne Hoch,
Frank Stella,
1959


Dorothy Miller,
MOMA curator,
died at 99 on
July 11, 2003
.

 


Thursday, August 14, 2003  3:45 AM

Famous Last Words

The ending of an Aug. 14 Salon.com article on Mel Gibson’s new film, “The Passion”:

” ‘The Passion’ will most likely offer up the familiar puerile, stereotypical view of the evil Jew calling for Jesus’ blood and the clueless Pilate begging him to reconsider. It is a view guaranteed to stir anew the passions of the rabid Christian, and one that will send the Jews scurrying back to the dark corners of history.”

— Christopher Orlet

“Scurrying”?!  The ghost of Joseph Goebbels, who famously portrayed Jews as sewer rats doing just that, must be laughing — perhaps along with the ghost of Lady Diana Mosley (née Mitford), who died Monday.

This goes well with a story that Orlet tells at his website:

“… to me, the most genuine last words are those that arise naturally from the moment, such as

 

Joseph Goebbels

 

Voltaire’s response to a request that he foreswear Satan: ‘This is no time to make new enemies.’ ”

For a view of Satan as an old, familiar, acquaintance, see the link to Prince Ombra in my entry last October 29 for Goebbels’s birthday.


Wednesday, August 13, 2003  3:00 PM

Best Picture

For some reflections inspired in part by

click here.


Tuesday, August 12, 2003  4:44 PM

Atonement:

A sequel to my entry “Catholic Tastes” of July 27, 2003.

Some remarks of Wallace Stevens that seem appropriate on this date:

“It may be that one life is a punishment
For another, as the son’s life for the father’s.”

—  Esthétique du Mal, Wallace Stevens

Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Jr.

“Unless we believe in the hero, what is there
To believe? ….
Devise, devise, and make him of winter’s
Iciest core, a north star, central
In our oblivion, of summer’s
Imagination, the golden rescue:
The bread and wine of the mind….”

Examination of the Hero in a Time of War, Wallace Stevens

Etymology of “Atonement”:

Middle English atonen, to be reconciled, from at one, in agreement

At One

“… We found,
If we found the central evil, the central good….
… we and the diamond globe at last were one.”

Asides on the Oboe, Wallace Stevens


Tuesday, August 12, 2003  1:52 PM

Franken & ‘Stein,
Attorneys at Law

Tue August 12, 2003 04:10 AM ET
NEW YORK (Reuters) – Fox News Network is suing humor writer Al Franken for trademark infringement over the phrase ‘fair and balanced’ on the cover of his upcoming book, saying it has been ‘a signature slogan’ of the network since 1996.”

Franken:
Fair?

‘Stein:
Balanced?

For answers, click on the pictures
of Franken and ‘Stein.


Monday, April 28, 2003

Monday April 28, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:07 AM

ART WARS:

Toward Eternity

April is Poetry Month, according to the Academy of American Poets.  It is also Mathematics Awareness Month, funded by the National Security Agency; this year's theme is "Mathematics and Art."

Some previous journal entries for this month seem to be summarized by Emily Dickinson's remarks:

"Because I could not stop for Death–
He kindly stopped for me–
The Carriage held but just Ourselves–
And Immortality.

………………………
Since then–'tis Centuries–and yet
Feels shorter than the Day
I first surmised the Horses' Heads
Were toward Eternity– "

 

Consider the following journal entries from April 7, 2003:
 

Math Awareness Month

April is Math Awareness Month.
This year's theme is "mathematics and art."


 

An Offer He Couldn't Refuse

Today's birthday:  Francis Ford Coppola is 64.

"There is a pleasantly discursive treatment
of Pontius Pilate's unanswered question
'What is truth?'."


H. S. M. Coxeter, 1987, introduction to Richard J. Trudeau's remarks on the "Story Theory" of truth as opposed to the "Diamond Theory" of truth in The Non-Euclidean Revolution

 

From a website titled simply Sinatra:

"Then came From Here to Eternity. Sinatra lobbied hard for the role, practically getting on his knees to secure the role of the street smart punk G.I. Maggio. He sensed this was a role that could revive his career, and his instincts were right. There are lots of stories about how Columbia Studio head Harry Cohn was convinced to give the role to Sinatra, the most famous of which is expanded upon in the horse's head sequence in The Godfather. Maybe no one will know the truth about that. The one truth we do know is that the feisty New Jersey actor won the Academy Award as Best Supporting Actor for his work in From Here to Eternity. It was no looking back from then on."

From a note on geometry of April 28, 1985:

 
The "horse's head" figure above is from a note I wrote on this date 18 years ago.  The following journal entry from April 4, 2003, gives some details:
 

The Eight

Today, the fourth day of the fourth month, plays an important part in Katherine Neville's The Eight.  Let us honor this work, perhaps the greatest bad novel of the twentieth century, by reflecting on some properties of the number eight.  Consider eight rectangular cells arranged in an array of four rows and two columns.  Let us label these cells with coordinates, then apply a permutation.

 


 Decimal 
labeling

 
Binary
labeling


Algebraic
labeling


Permutation
labeling

 

The resulting set of arrows that indicate the movement of cells in a permutation (known as a Singer 7-cycle) outlines rather neatly, in view of the chess theme of The Eight, a knight.  This makes as much sense as anything in Neville's fiction, and has the merit of being based on fact.  It also, albeit rather crudely, illustrates the "Mathematics and Art" theme of this year's Mathematics Awareness Month.

The visual appearance of the "knight" permutation is less important than the fact that it leads to a construction (due to R. T. Curtis) of the Mathieu group M24 (via the Curtis Miracle Octad Generator), which in turn leads logically to the Monster group and to related "moonshine" investigations in the theory of modular functions.   See also "Pieces of Eight," by Robert L. Griess.

Wednesday, April 23, 2003

Wednesday April 23, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 AM

Midnight in the Garden
of Good and Evil
on Shakespeare’s Birthday

Tony Scherman on an April 7, 1968, recording by Nina Simone:

“…nobody could telescope more emotion into a single, idiosyncratically turned syllable (listen to the way she says the word “Savannah” in her spoken intro to “Sunday in Savannah.” It breaks your heart — and she ain’t even singin’ yet!).”

See also the following entries on midnight in the garden:

Trinity, Oct. 25, 2002

Midnight in the Garden, Oct. 26, 2002

Point of No Return, Dec. 10, 2002

Culture Clash at Midnight, Dec. 11, 2002

Dead Poets Society, Dec. 13, 2002

For the Dark Lady, Dec. 18, 2002

Nightmare Alley, Dec. 21, 2002

For the Green Lady, Dec. 21, 2002

“With a little effort, anything can be shown to connect with anything else: existence is infinitely cross-referenced.”

Opening sentence of Martha Cooley’s The Archivist

Woe unto
them that
call evil
good, and
good evil;
that put
darkness
for light,
and light
for darkness

Isaiah 5:20

 

 

As she spoke about the Trees of Life and Death, I watched her…. 
The Archivist

The world
has gone
mad today
And good’s
bad today,

And black’s
white today,
And day’s
night today

Cole Porter

 

 

Tuesday, April 15, 2003

Tuesday April 15, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:07 PM

Green and Burning

After posting the 2:42 PM entry at a public library this afternoon, I picked up the following at a “Friends of the Library” used-book sale:

The Green and Burning Tree:
On the Writing and Enjoyment
of Children’s Books

by Eleanor Cameron (Little, Brown and Company, Boston and Toronto, 1969).

Cameron, on page 73, gives the source of her title; it is from the Mabinogion:

“And they saw a tall tree by the side of the river, one half of which was in flames from the root to the top, and the other half was green and in full leaf.”

Cameron finds the meaning of this symbol in Dylan Thomas: His Life and Work, by John Ackerman (Oxford University Press, 1964), p. 6:

“Another important feature of the old Welsh poetry is an awareness of the dual nature of reality, of unity in disunity, of the simultaneity of life and death, of time as an eternal moment rather than as something with a past and future.”

For part of a Nobel Prize lecture on this topic — time as an eternal moment — see Architecture of Eternity, a journal note from December 8, 2002.

That lecture is from an author, Octavio Paz, who wrote in Spanish.  Here are some other words in that language:

Mi verso es de un verde claro,
Y de un carmín encendido.

My verse is a clear green,
And a burning crimson.

These lyrics to the song “Guantanamera” (see Palm Sunday) were on my mind this afternoon when Cameron’s book caught my eye.

Green and crimson are, of course, also the colors of Christmas, or “Christ Mass.”  In view of the fact that Cameron’s book is about children’s literature, this leads, like it or not, to the following meditation.

From a religious site:

Matthew 18:3 – And said, Truly I say to you, Unless you are converted, and become like little children, you shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven.

Mark 10:15 – Truly I say to you, Whoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child shall not enter it at all.

Luke 18:17 – Truly I say to you, Whoever does not receive the kingdom of God as a little child shall by no means enter it.

A meditation from a less religious site:

“What I tell you three times is true.”

Finally, from what I now consider 

  • in view of the song lyrics quoted above,
  • in view of the fact that it deals with a Cuban movie also titled “Guantanamera,”
  • in view of Cameron’s remarks on Bergman’s “The Seventh Seal” (p. 129), and
  • in view of my April 7 entry on mathematics and art,

to be an extremely religious site, a picture:

Tuesday, April 8, 2003

Tuesday April 8, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:07 PM

Death’s Dream Kingdom

April 7, 2003, Baghdad – A US tank blew a huge statue of President Saddam Hussein off its pedestal in central Baghdad on Monday with a single shell, a US officer said…. “One shot, one kill.”

“When smashing monuments, save the pedestals; they always come in handy.”

Stanislaw J. Lec 

“In death’s dream kingdom….

Between the idea
And the reality
Between the motion
And the act
Falls the Shadow”

— T. S. Eliot, Harvard 1910, The Hollow Men

“A light check in the shadow
is the same gray as
a dark check outside the shadow.”

— Edward H. Adelson, Yale 1974, Illusions and Demos

“point A / In a perspective that begins again / At B”

— Wallace Stevens, Harvard 1901, “The Rock

See also

Shine On, Hermann Weyl.

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