Log24

Sunday, February 12, 2017

Colorful Tales

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:23 PM

“Perhaps the philosophically most relevant feature of modern science
is the emergence of abstract symbolic structures as the hard core
of objectivity behind— as Eddington puts it— the colorful tale of
the subjective storyteller mind.”

— Hermann Weyl, Philosophy of  Mathematics and
    Natural Science 
, Princeton, 1949, p. 237

Harvard University Press on the late Angus Fletcher, author of
The Topological Imagination  and Colors of the Mind

From the Harvard webpage for Colors of the Mind

Angus Fletcher is one of our finest theorists of the arts,
the heir to I. A. Richards, Erich Auerbach, Northrop Frye.
This… book…  aims to open another field of study:
how thought— the act, the experience of thinking—
is represented in literature.

. . . .

Fletcher’s resources are large, and his step is sure.
The reader samples his piercing vision of Milton’s

Satan, the original Thinker,
leaving the pain of thinking
as his legacy for mankind.

A 1992 review by Vinay Dharwadker of Colors of the Mind —

See also the above word "dianoia" in The Echo in Plato's Cave.
Some context 

This post was suggested by a memorial piece today in
the Los Angeles Review of Books

A Florilegium for Angus Fletcher

By Kenneth Gross, Lindsay Waters, V. N. Alexander,
Paul Auster, Harold Bloom, Stanley Fish, K. J. Knoespel,
Mitchell Meltzer, Victoria Nelson, Joan Richardson,
Dorian Sagan, Susan Stewart, Eric Wilson, Michael Wood

Fletcher reportedly died on November 28, 2016.

"I learned from Fletcher how to apprehend
the daemonic element in poetic imagination."

— Harold Bloom in today's Los Angeles florilegium

For more on Bloom and the daemonic, see a Log24 post,
"Interpenetration," from the date of Fletcher's death.

Some backstory:  Dharwadker in this journal.

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Colorful Tales

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:50 PM

See also the Log24 post from May 18,
the date of Eric Caidin's reported death,
as well as Hexagram 50 and May 14, 2014—
Death in Mathmagic Land.

Friday, May 22, 2015

Colorful Tale

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:01 AM

See a post of Nov. 17, 2011 — Void.

"We tell ourselves stories in order to live."
— Joan Didion, The White Album

See also John Gregory Dunne.

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Colorful Tale

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

(A sequel to yesterday's ART WARS and this
morning's De Colores )

“Perhaps the philosophically most relevant feature
of modern science is the emergence of abstract
symbolic structures as the hard core of objectivity
behind– as Eddington puts it– the colorful tale
of the subjective storyteller mind.” — Hermann Weyl
(Philosophy of  Mathematics and Natural Science ,
Princeton, 1949, p. 237)

See also Deathly Hallows.

Friday, December 19, 2014

Colorful Tale

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:30 AM

Wikipedia on a tale about one Hippasus of Metapontum,
who supposedly was drowned by Pythagoreans for his
discovery of irrational numbers and/or of the dodecahedron —

"In the hands of modern writers this combination of vague
ancient reports and modern guesswork has sometimes
evolved into a much more emphatic and colourful tale."

See, for instance, a tale told by the late Carl Sagan,
who was bitterly anti-Pythagorean (and anti-Platonic):

IMAGE- Sagan in 'Cosmos' on the Pythagoreans

For a related colorful tale, see "Patrick Blackburn" in this journal.

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Colorful Tale

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:45 AM

Continued.

"Perhaps the philosophically most relevant feature
of modern science is the emergence of abstract
symbolic structures as the hard core of objectivity
behind— as Eddington puts it— the colorful tale
of the subjective storyteller mind."

— Hermann Weyl in Philosophy of Mathematics
     and Natural Science
 , Princeton, 1949, p. 237

Tom Wolfe on art theorists in The Painted Word  (1975) :

"It is important to repeat that Greenberg and Rosenberg
did not create their theories in a vacuum or simply turn up
with them one day like tablets brought down from atop
Green Mountain or Red Mountain (as B. H. Friedman once
called the two men). As tout le monde  understood, they
were not only theories but … hot news,
straight from the studios, from the scene."

The Weyl quote is a continuing theme in this journal.
The Wolfe quote appeared here on Nov. 18, 2014,
the reported date of death of Yale graduate student 
Natasha Chichilnisky-Heal.

Directions to her burial (see yesterday evening) include
a mention of "Paul Robson Street" (actually Paul
Robeson Place) near "the historic Princeton Cemetery."

This, together with the remarks by Tom Wolfe posted
here on the reported day of her death, suggests a search
for "red green black" —

The late Chichilnisky-Heal was a student of political economy.

The search colors may be interpreted, if one likes, as referring
to politics (red), economics (green), and Robeson (black).

See also Robeson in this journal.

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Colorful Tale (continued)

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:15 PM

In memory of ad writer Julian Koenig, who apparently
coined the phrase “Earth Day” for April 22 (his birthday):

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Colorful Tale

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:00 PM

See also all  instances of the phrase “colorful tale” in this journal.

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Colorful Tale

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:00 PM

Friday, November 1, 2013

Colorful Tale

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:00 AM

See the title phrase in this journal.

See also posts from last August tagged Storyville.

Friday, August 24, 2012

A Colorful Tale

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 6:06 AM

(Continued from July 19, 2008)

From the Diamond 16 Puzzle

IMAGE- The Diamond 16 Puzzle

The resemblance between the "quadrants" part of
the above picture and the new Microsoft symbol

IMAGE- New Microsoft symbol, August 2012

— is of course purely coincidental, as is the fact
that the new symbol illustrates four colors.

Monday, February 13, 2017

“The Echo in Plato’s Cave” Continues.

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:00 PM

The previous post, "Colorful Tales," on the Nov. 28, 2016, death
of one Angus Fletcher, together with the remarks indexed above,
suggest a review from 

The archives of The New York Times  —

"THE ANATOMY OF INFLUENCE
Literature as a Way of Life

By Harold Bloom
357 pp. Yale University Press. $32.50.

Sam Tanenhaus is the editor of the Book Review.

A version of this review appeared in print
on May 22, 2011, on Page BR1 of the 
Sunday Book Review with the headline:
'An Uncommon Reader.'"

"By this time, Bloom had burrowed into a cave,
its lamplit forms and shapes merging into
an occult mythos scarcely intelligible
even to other scholars. 'Bloom had an idea,' 
Christopher Ricks said; 'now the idea has him.' 
Cynthia Ozick, meanwhile, called him an 'idol-maker.' 
In contrast to Cleanth Brooks . . . ."

An illustration from "The Echo in Plato's Cave" linked to
in the previous post

http://www.log24.com/log/pix08/080413-Marabar.jpg

Judy Davis in the Marabar Caves
 

Cynthia Ozick on Bloom —

See also Dharwadker in the previous post and on the Higgs boson.

Monday, April 27, 2015

Cross of Five Ninths

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 PM

See Five Ninths in this journal and Colorful Tale.

     Cross of Black and Gray

See also "Why do Muslims pray five times daily?".

Friday, March 6, 2015

Cinéma Vérité

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:11 PM

Three Colorful Tales —

See also the recent film Nightcrawler .

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Gullible’s Travels

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:01 PM

The President of the United States
on the Sony hacking 
in his Dec. 19 press conference:

"But let’s talk of the specifics of what we now know.
The FBI announced today and we can confirm that
North Korea engaged in this attack. I think it says
something interesting about North Korea that they
decided to have the state mount an all-out assault
on a movie studio because of a satirical movie…."

This post was suggested in part by the contemptibly
misleading remarks of Carl Sagan in his "Cosmos"
TV series (see yesterday's Colorful Tale) and by the 
following remarks in a Presentation Zen  piece dated
March 11, 2014, "More Storytelling Lessons from 'Cosmos'," 
praising Sagan's vulgarizations —

"Good storytelling causes the audience to ask questions
as your narrative progresses. As the storyteller you can
ask questions directly, but often a more interesting approach
is to present the material in a way that triggers the audience
to come up with the questions themselves. And yet we must
not be afraid to leave some (many?) questions unanswered.
When we think of a story we may think of clear conclusions
and neat, clear endings, but reality can be quite a bit more
complicated than that."

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Bing Bang Theory

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:00 PM

Microsoft in 2009 on its new search engine name—

"We like Bing because it sounds off in our heads
when we think about that moment of discovery
and decision making— when you resolve those
important tasks."

A search on Bing today —

IMAGE- Top search result on Bing for 'diamond space' on Dec. 18, 2013

A colorful tale —

IMAGE- The Diamond 16 Puzzle, with commentary

"Bing bang, I saw the whole gang
Bobby Darin, 1958

Saturday, March 30, 2013

Blackboard Jungle

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:30 AM

(Continued)

Harrowing of Hell (Catholic Encyclopedia )

"This is the Old English and Middle English term
for the triumphant descent of Christ into hell (or Hades)
between the time of His Crucifixion and His Resurrection,
when, according to Christian belief, He brought salvation
to the souls held captive there since the beginning of the world."

Through the Blackboard (Feb. 25, 2010)—

Physicist accelerated against his blackboard in 'A Serious Man'

See also The Dreaming Jewels and Colorful Tale.

Friday, August 24, 2012

Formal Pattern

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 4:28 PM

(Continued from In Memoriam (Aug. 22), Chapman's Homer (Aug. 23),
and this morning's Colorful Tale)

An informative, but undated, critique of the late Marvin W. Meyer
by April D. DeConick at the website of the Society of Biblical Literature
appeared in more popular form in an earlier New York Times
op-ed piece, "Gospel Truth," dated Dec. 1, 2007.

A check, in accord with Jungian synchronicity, of this  journal
on that date yields a quotation from Plato's Phaedrus  —

"The soul or animate being has the care of the inanimate."

Related verses from T. S. Eliot's Four Quartets

"The detail of the pattern is movement."

"So we moved, and they, in a formal pattern."

Some background from pure mathematics (what the late
William P. Thurston called "the theory of formal patterns")—

The Animated Diamond Theorem.

Saturday, September 17, 2011

The Uploading

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:32 AM

(Continued from March 9.)

A detail from "Feist Sings 1, 2, 3, 4"—

"Uploaded by SesameStreet on Jul 18, 2008"

Those who prefer, as Weyl put it,
"
the hard core of objectivity"
to, as Eddington put it,
"the colorful tale of the subjective storyteller mind"
may consult this journal on the same day… July 18, 2008.

Saturday, July 19, 2008

Saturday July 19, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:00 PM
Hard Core

(continued from yesterday)

Bertram Kostant, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at MIT, on an object discussed in this week’s New Yorker:

A word about E(8). In my opinion, and shared by others, E(8) is the most magnificent ‘object’ in all of mathematics. It is like a diamond with thousands of facets. Each facet offering a different view of its unbelievable intricate internal structure.”

Hermann Weyl on the hard core of objectivity:

“Perhaps the philosophically most relevant feature of modern science is the emergence of abstract symbolic structures as the hard core of objectivity behind– as Eddington puts it– the colorful tale of the subjective storyteller mind.” (Philosophy of Mathematics and Natural Science, Princeton, 1949, p. 237)


Steven H. Cullinane on the symmetries of a 4×4 array of points:

A Structure-Endowed Entity

“A guiding principle in modern mathematics is this lesson: Whenever you have to do with a structure-endowed entity S, try to determine its group of automorphisms, the group of those element-wise transformations which leave all structural relations undisturbed.  You can expect to gain a deep insight into the constitution of S in this way.”

— Hermann Weyl in Symmetry

Let us apply Weyl’s lesson to the following “structure-endowed entity.”

4x4 array of dots

What is the order of the resulting group of automorphisms?

The above group of
automorphisms plays
a role in what Weyl,
following Eddington,
  called a “colorful tale”–

The Diamond 16 Puzzle

The Diamond 16 Puzzle

This puzzle shows
that the 4×4 array can
also be viewed in
thousands of ways.

“You can make 322,560
pairs of patterns. Each
 pair pictures a different
symmetry of the underlying
16-point space.”

— Steven H. Cullinane,
July 17, 2008

For other parts of the tale,
see Ashay Dharwadker,
the Four-Color Theorem,
and Usenet Postings
.

Friday, July 18, 2008

Friday July 18, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Hard Core

David Corfield quotes Weyl in a weblog entry, "Hierarchy and Emergence," at the n-Category Cafe this morning:

"Perhaps the philosophically most relevant feature of modern science is the emergence of abstract symbolic structures as the hard core of objectivity behind– as Eddington puts it– the colorful tale of the subjective storyteller mind." (Philosophy of Mathematics and Natural Science [Princeton, 1949], p. 237)

For the same quotation in a combinatorial context, see the foreword by A. W. Tucker, "Combinatorial Problems," to a special issue of the IBM Journal of Research and Development, November 1960 (1-page pdf).

See also yesterday's Log24 entry.
 

Powered by WordPress