Log24

Monday, July 30, 2012

Geometry and Death

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:23 PM

(Continued)

A Necessary Truth—

James Singer, "A Theorem in Finite Projective Geometry
and Some Applications to Number Theory," Transactions
of the American Mathematical Society  
43 (1938), 377-385.

A Contingent Truth—

Singer Tony Martin reportedly died Friday evening, July 27, 2012.

In his memory, some references to a "Singer 7-Cycle."

See also this journal 7 years prior to Martin's death.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Geometry and Death

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 4:28 AM

Continued from other posts.

IMAGE- From the 3/13 NY Times obituaries- Albert Abramson, Holocaust Museum backer, with other deaths

Related material from Washington Jewish Week

"Abramson did not always get his way; he didn't have to win, but never took his eye off the ball— the Museum had to emerge the better. He did not take loses personally but pragmatically. A design for the Museum building done by an architect from his firm was charitably speaking 'mediocre.' It was replaced by a brilliant building designed by James Ingo Freed who rightfully regarded it as the master work of his distinguished career. Abramson became Freed's champion. He pushed the design team for a happy ending, saying that he knew the American people and they needed an uplifting ending since the subject of the Holocaust was so very depressing."

— and from the Holocaust Memorial Museum

IMAGE- Holocaust Museum, architectural details

Update of 5:01 AM March 13—

See also yesterday's post The Line and
the section "The Pythagorean/ Platonic tradition"
at David Wade's website Pattern in Islamic Art.

Wednesday, June 3, 2015

For Soccer Moms

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Olivier as Dr. Christian Szell

The icosahedron (a source of duads and synthemes)

Is it safe?"

      — Annals of Art Education : 
           Geometry and Death

Monday, October 8, 2012

Issue 16

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 8:14 PM

From triplecanopy, Issue 16 —

International Art English, by Alix Rule and David Levine (July 30, 2012)

… In what follows, we examine some of the curious lexical, grammatical, and stylistic features of what we call International Art English. We consider IAE’s origins, and speculate about the future of this language through which contemporary art is created, promoted, sold, and understood. Some will read our argument as an overelaborate joke. But there’s nothing funny about this language to its users. And the scale of its use testifies to the stakes involved. We are quite serious….*

Space  is an especially important word in IAE and can refer to a raft of entities not traditionally thought of as spatial (the space of humanity ) as well as ones that are in most circumstances quite obviously spatial (the space of the gallery ). An announcement for the 2010 exhibition “Jimmie Durham and His Metonymic Banquet,” at Proyecto de Arte Contemporáneo Murcia in Spain, had the artist “questioning the division between inside and outside in the Western sacred space”—the venue was a former church—“to highlight what is excluded in order to invest the sanctum with its spatial purity. Pieces of cement, wire, refrigerators, barrels, bits of glass and residues of ‘the sacred,’ speak of the space of the exhibition hall … transforming it into a kind of ‘temple of confusion.’”

Spatial and nonspatial space are interchangeable in IAE. The critic John Kelsey, for instance, writes that artist Rachel Harrison “causes an immediate confusion between the space of retail and the space of subjective construction.” The rules for space  in this regard also apply to field , as in “the field of the real”—which is where, according to art historian Carrie Lambert-Beatty, “the parafictional has one foot.” (Prefixes like para -, proto -, post -, and hyper – expand the lexicon exponentially and Germanly, which is to say without adding any new words.) It’s not just that IAE is rife with spacey terms like intersection , parallel , parallelism , void , enfold , involution , and platform …

* Footnote not in the original—
  See also Geometry and Death from the date of the above article.

Monday, July 30, 2012

Something to Read

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 1:00 PM

(Continued)

Eric M. Friedlander, President of the
American Mathematical Society (AMS),
in the March 2011 AMS Notices 

"I think the best thing the AMS does by far is the Notices .
It could easily be in all doctors’ and dentists’ offices."

Notices : "Really?"

Friedlander: "It could be."

Related material from this journal:

Olivier as Dr. Christian Szell

The icosahedron (a source of duads and synthemes)

Is it safe?"

 Annals of Art Education: 
     Geometry and Death

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Yonda

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 PM

(Continued)

The Grind House of My Father

New York Times  headline for the latest
    Will Ferrell film, Casa de Mi Padre

Related material—

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

A for Anastasios

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 7:59 PM

The title was suggested by this evening's 4-digit NY lottery number.

"… the rhetoric might be a bit over the top."

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110615-NYlottery.jpg

According to Amazon.com, 2198 (i.e., 2/1/98) was the publication
date of Geometry of Vector Sheaves , Volume I, by Anastasios Mallios.

Related material—

The question of S.S. Chern quoted here June 10: —
"What is Geometry?"— and the remark by Stevens that
accompanied the quotation—

"Reality is the beginning not the end,
Naked Alpha, not the hierophant Omega,
of dense investiture, with luminous vassals."
— Wallace Stevens,
“An Ordinary Evening in New Haven” VI

The work of Mallios in pure mathematics cited above seems
quite respectable (unlike his later remarks on physics).
His Vector Sheaves  appears to be trying to explore new territory;
hence the relevance of Stevens's "Alpha." See also the phrase
"A-Invariance" in an undated preprint by Mallios*.

For the evening 3-digit number, 533, see a Stevens poem—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110615-RiverOfRivers.jpg

This meditation by Stevens is related to the female form of Mallios's Christian name.

As for the afternoon numbers, see "62" in The Beauty Test (May 23, 2007), Geometry and Death, and "9181" as the date 9/1/81.

* Later published in International Journal of Theoretical Physics , Vol. 47, No. 7, cover date 2008-07-01

Monday, June 6, 2011

Tree of Life — Jewish Version

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 6:48 PM

Today's midday NY Lottery number was 753, the number of a significant page in Gravity's Rainbow .

An excerpt from that page ((Penguin Classics paperback, June 1, 1995)—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110606-Countdown753.gif

"… the Abyss had crept intolerably close, only an accident away…."

Midrash— See Ben Stein in this journal. 

But seriously… See "Geometry and Death" in this journal.

See also PlanetMath.org on the Hesse configuration

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110108-PlanetMath.jpg

A picture of the Hesse configuration—

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/grid3x3med.bmp” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors. .

Some context— A Study in Art Education.

Friday, February 20, 2009

Friday February 20, 2009

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 11:01 PM

The Cross
of Constantine

mentioned in
this afternoon's entry
"Emblematizing the Modern"
was the object of a recent
cinematic chase sequence
(successful and inspiring)
starring Mira Sorvino
at the Metropolitan
Museum of Art.

In memory of
Dr. Hunter S. Thompson,
dead by his own hand
on this date
four years ago

Rolling Stone memorial to Dr. Hunter S. Thompson

Click for details.

There is
another sort of object
we may associate with a
different museum and with
a modern Constantine
See "Art Wars for MoMA"
(Dec. 14, 2008).

This object, modern
rather than medieval,
is the ninefold square:

The ninefold square

It may suit those who,
like Rosalind Krauss
(see "Emblematizing"),
admire the grids of modern art
but view any sort of Christian
cross with fear and loathing.

For some background that
Dr. Thompson might appreciate,
see notes on Geometry and Death
in this journal, June 1-15, 2007,
and the five Log24 entries
 ending at 9 AM Dec. 10. 2006,
which include this astute
observation by J. G. Ballard:

"Modernism's attempt to build a better world with the aid of science and technology now seems almost heroic. Bertolt Brecht, no fan of modernism, remarked that the mud, blood and carnage of the first world war trenches left its survivors longing for a future that resembled a white-tiled bathroom."

Selah.

Saturday, August 2, 2008

Saturday August 2, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:02 PM
Geometry and Death

(continued from
June 15, 2007)

Today is the anniversary
of the 1955 death of poet
Wallace Stevens.

Related material:

A poem by Stevens,

an essay on  the
relationships between
poets and philosophers —
“Bad Blood,” by
Leonard Michaels

and

The ninefold square, a symbol of Apollo

the Log24 entries
of June 14-15, 2007
.

Monday, May 26, 2008

Monday May 26, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:07 AM
Crystal Vision

Stevie Nicks
 is 60 today.

Poster for the film 'The Craft'

On the author discussed
here yesterday,
Siri Hustvedt:

“… she explores
the nature of identity
in a structure* of
crystalline complexity.”

Janet Burroway,   
quoted in  
ART WARS  

Olivier as Dr. Christian Szell

The icosahedron (a source of duads and synthemes)

“Is it safe?”

Annals of Art Education:
 Geometry and Death

* Related material:
the life and work of
Felix Christian Klein
and
Report to the Joint
Mathematics Meetings

Friday, June 15, 2007

Friday June 15, 2007

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 10:31 PM
Geometry and Death

(continued from Dec. 11, 2006):

J. G. Ballard on "the architecture of death":

"… a huge system of German fortifications that included the Siegfried line, submarine pens and huge flak towers that threatened the surrounding land like lines of Teutonic knights. Almost all had survived the war and seemed to be waiting for the next one, left behind by a race of warrior scientists obsessed with geometry and death."

The Guardian, March 20, 2006

From the previous entry, which provided a lesson in geometry related, if only by synchronicity, to the death of Jewish art theorist Rudolf Arnheim:

"We are going to keep doing this until we get it right."

Here is a lesson related, again by synchronicity, to the death of a Christian art scholar of "uncommon erudition, wit, and grace"– Robert R. Wark of the Huntington Library.  Wark died on June 8, a date I think of as the feast day of St. Gerard Manley Hopkins, a Jesuit priest-poet of the nineteenth century.

From a Log24 entry on the date of Wark's death–

Samuel Pepys on a musical performance (Diary, Feb. 27, 1668):

"When the Angel comes down"

"When the Angel Comes Down, and the Soul Departs," a webpage on dance in Bali:

"Dance is also a devotion to the Supreme Being."

Julie Taymor, interview:

"I went to Bali to a remote village by a volcanic mountain…."

The above three quotations were intended to supply some background for a link to an entry on Taymor, on what Taymor has called "skewed mirrors," and on a related mathematical concept named, using a term Hopkins coined, "inscapes."

They might form part of an introductory class in mathematics and art given, like the class of the previous entry, in Purgatory.

Wark, who is now, one imagines, in Paradise, needs no such class.  He nevertheless might enjoy listening in.

A guest teacher in
the purgatorial class
on mathematics
and art:

Olivier as Dr. Christian Szell

The icosahedron (a source of duads and synthemes)

"Is it safe?"

Sunday, February 11, 2007

Sunday February 11, 2007

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:56 AM
George Sadek, 78,
Graphic Design Educator,
Dies

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070211-GeorgeSadek.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Sadek died on Feb. 5.

Related material:

“Harvard Design” (Feb. 6),

Geometry and Death
(entries of December 2006)
,

“Release Date”
in “Immortal Diamond”
(Feb. 5 four years ago).

The design over Sadek’s
head is a St. Bridget’s cross.

(See the “Release Date”
link above.)

Monday, December 11, 2006

Monday December 11, 2006

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 7:20 AM
Geometry and Death

J. G. Ballard on “the architecture of death“:

“… a huge system of German fortifications that included the Siegfried line, submarine pens and huge flak towers that threatened the surrounding land like lines of Teutonic knights. Almost all had survived the war and seemed to be waiting for the next one, left behind by a race of warrior scientists obsessed with geometry and death.”

The Guardian, March 20, 2006

Edward Hirsch on Lorca:

“For him, writing is a struggle both with geometry and death.”

— “The Duende,” American Poetry Review, July/August 1999

“Rosenblum writes with
absolute intellectual honesty,
and the effect is sheer liberation….
The disposition of the material is
a model of logic and clarity.”

Harper’s Magazine review
quoted on back cover of
Cubism and Twentieth-Century Art,
by Robert Rosenblum
(Abrams paperback, 2001)

SINGER, ISAAC:
“Are Children the Ultimate Literary Critics?”
 — Top of the News 29 (Nov. 1972): 32-36.
“Sets forth his own aims in writing for children
 and laments ‘slice of life’ and chaos in
children’s literature. Maintains that children
like good plots, logic, and clarity,
and that they have a concern for
‘so-called eternal questions.'”

An Annotated Listing of Criticism
by Linnea Hendrickson

“She returned the smile, then looked
across the room to her youngest brother,
Charles Wallace, and to their father,
who were deep in concentration, bent
over the model they were building
of a tesseract: the square squared,
and squared again: a construction
of the dimension of time.”

A Swiftly Tilting Planet,
by Madeleine L’Engle

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06B/061211-Swiftly2.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

For “the dimension of time,”
see A Fold in Time,
Time Fold, and
Diamond Theory in 1937

A Swiftly Tilting Planet is a fantasy for children set partly in Vespugia, a fictional country bordered by Chile and Argentina.

For a more adult audience —

In memory of General Augusto Pinochet, who died yesterday in Santiago, Chile, a quotation from Federico Garcia Lorca‘s lecture on “the Duende” (Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1933):

“… Philip of Austria… longing to discover the Muse and the Angel in theology, found himself imprisoned by the Duende of cold ardors in that masterwork of the Escorial, where geometry abuts with a dream and the Duende wears the mask of the Muse for the eternal chastisement of the great king.”


Perhaps. Or perhaps Philip, “the lonely
hermit of the Escorial,” is less lonely now.

Sunday, December 10, 2006

Sunday December 10, 2006

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 AM
The Librarian

"Like all men of the Library,
I have traveled in my youth."
— Jorge Luis Borges,
The Library of Babel

"Papá me mandó un artículo
de J. G. Ballard en el que
se refiere a cómo el lugar
de la muerte es central en
nuestra cultura contemporánea
."

— Sonya Walger,
interview dated September 14
(Feast of the Triumph of the Cross),
Anno Domini 2006

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06B/061210-Quest.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Sonya Walger,
said to have been
born on D-Day,
the sixth of June,
in 1974

 

Walger's father is, like Borges,
from Argentina.
She "studied English Literature
at Christ Church College, Oxford,
where she received
    a First Class degree…. "

Wikipedia

"… un artículo de J. G. Ballard…."–

A Handful of Dust
, by J. G. Ballard

(The Guardian, March 20, 2006):

"… The Atlantic wall was only part of a huge system of German fortifications that included the Siegfried line, submarine pens and huge flak towers that threatened the surrounding land like lines of Teutonic knights. Almost all had survived the war and seemed to be waiting for the next one, left behind by a race of warrior scientists obsessed with geometry and death.

Death was what the Atlantic wall and Siegfried line were all about….

… modernism of the heroic period, from 1920 to 1939, is dead, and it died first in the blockhouses of Utah beach and the Siegfried line…

Modernism's attempt to build a better world with the aid of science and technology now seems almost heroic. Bertolt Brecht, no fan of modernism, remarked that the mud, blood and carnage of the first world war trenches left its survivors longing for a future that resembled a white-tiled bathroom.  Architects were in the vanguard of the new movement, led by Le Corbusier and the Bauhaus design school. The old models were thrown out. Function defined form, expressed in a pure geometry that the eye could easily grasp in its entirety."

The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/motto2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
 
The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/grid3x3.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

"This is the garden of Apollo,
the field of Reason…."
John Outram, architect 

(Click on picture for details.)

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06B/061210-Holl.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
The Left Hand of God, by Adolf Holl

Related material:

The Lottery of Babylon
and
the previous entry.
 

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