Log24

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Not So New

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:48 AM

"I just found me a brand new box of matches …"

— Soundtrack of the  trailer for "Ocean's 8"

" matchwood, immortal diamond …." —

Click the above definitions for further information.

See as well Blue Diamond in this journal.

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

A Consolatory Tale

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 3:13 PM

The title is taken from Isak Dinesen— See the previous post,
which posed the question, "Stylist or fraud?"

Stylist and  fraud—

The stylist:   Gerard Manley Hopkins, Society of Jesus

The fraud (i.e., the fiction):

Scifi art- Women on Diamond

Click on the cover art for further details.

The cover artist, by the way, died on the date*
mentioned prominently in the previous post.

* September 7, 2009. 
   See also that date in this journal, with its post
   "Magic Boxes." Happy birthday, J. K. Rowling.

Sunday, August 21, 2011

Cuatro Vientos

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:26 PM

Video: Pope to youths in Cuatro Vientos: "Thank you for your joy and resistance" YouTube

Tony Long at Wired.com, Aug. 30, 2007—  "Scattered to the four winds"—

Click to enlarge:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110821-FourWindsKerouac-500w.jpg

"This Jack, joke, poor potsherd, ' patch, matchwood, immortal diamond,
                Is immortal diamond." —Gerard Manley Hopkins, Society of Jesus

Friday, August 19, 2011

Geezer Puzzle

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 2:02 PM

An RSS item today—

Peter Cameron Diamond squares Fri Aug 19, 2011 05:36 [EDT] from Peter Cameron by Peter Cameron

If you like Latin squares and such things, take a look at Diamond Geezer’s post for today: a pair of orthogonal Latin squares with two disjoint common transversals, and some entries given (if you do the harder puzzle).

 

The post referred to—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110819-DiamondGeezerPuzzle.jpg

"This Jack, joke, poor potsherd, ' patch, matchwood, immortal diamond,
                Is immortal diamond." —Gerard Manley Hopkins, Society of Jesus

Those now celebrating the Catholic Church's "World Youth" week in Madrid
may prefer a related puzzle for younger and nimbler minds:

The Diamond 16 Puzzle.

Sunday, April 24, 2011

Romancing the Metaphor

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 2:24 PM

Background —

From a 1990 novel —
http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110424-StoneJunction.jpg

Monday, October 4, 2010

Stone Junction

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 6:29 AM

Continued from May 18, 2010.

Previous logo for the New York Times  feature "The Stone"—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101004-IntroducingTheStone100518.jpg

Today's new logo, appearing retroactively

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101004-NYT-newstonelogo.png

Comparison—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100518-TheStoneNYT.jpg   http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101004-NYT-thestone75.gif

From the October 3 "The Stone," Hegel on Wall Street

The “Phenomenology” is a philosophical portrait gallery that presents depictions, one after another, of different, fundamental ways in which individuals and societies have understood themselves.  Each self-understanding has two parts: an account of how a particular kind of self understands itself and, then, an account of the world that the self considers its natural counterpart.  Hegel narrates how each formation of self and world collapses because of a mismatch between self-conception and how that self conceives of the larger world.  Hegel thinks we can see how history has been driven by misshapen forms of life in which the self-understanding of agents and the worldly practices they participate in fail to correspond.  With great drama, he claims that his narrative is a “highway of despair.”

J.M. Bernstein of the New School for Social Research

A two-part self-understanding that is not  from Hegel—

1. An account of how a particular kind of self understands itself:

            … world’s wildfire, leave but ash:
                In a flash, at a trumpet crash,
I am all at once what Christ is, ' since he was what I am, and
This Jack, joke, poor potsherd, ' patch, matchwood, immortal diamond,
                Is immortal diamond.

2. An account of the world that the self considers its natural counterpart:

CLOUD-PUFFBALL, torn tufts, tossed pillows ' flaunt forth, then chevy on an air-
built thoroughfare: heaven-roysterers, in gay-gangs ' they throng; they glitter in marches.
Down roughcast, down dazzling whitewash, ' wherever an elm arches,
Shivelights and shadowtackle in long ' lashes lace, lance, and pair.
Delightfully the bright wind boisterous ' ropes, wrestles, beats earth bare
Of yestertempest’s creases; in pool and rut peel parches
Squandering ooze to squeezed ' dough, crust, dust; stanches, starches
Squadroned masks and manmarks ' treadmire toil there
Footfretted in it. Million-fuelèd, ' nature’s bonfire burns on.

Sunday, January 17, 2010

Welcome to the Ape Stuff

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 PM

NY Times obituary of Knox Burger,
book editor and agent, who died at 87 on January 4

"As a magazine editor in the 1950s, Knox Burger published Kurt Vonnegut’s first short story….

During Mr. Burger’s tenure at Collier’s, a short story by Vonnegut, whom he had known slightly when both were at Cornell and who was then working in public relations for General Electric, crossed his desk. He asked for changes, which Vonnegut made, and the story, 'Report on the Barnhouse Effect,' appeared in the magazine in February 1950. It was the first published work of fiction for Vonnegut, who recounted the episode decades later….

At least half a dozen authors… honored Mr. Burger by dedicating books to him. Vonnegut, who died in 2007, did, too. His dedication of Welcome to the Monkey House, a 1968 collection of short stories that included 'Report on the Barnhouse Effect,' read:

'To Knox Burger. Ten days older than I am. He has been a very good father to me.'"

A Jesuit at the
Gerard Manley Hopkins Archive

"Bisociation": The Act of Creation

"Koestler’s concept of ‘bisociation’… enters into the very ‘act of creation.’ In every such act, writes Koestler, the creator ‘bisociates,’ that is, combines, two ‘matrices’– two diverse patterns of knowing or perceiving– in a new way. As each matrix carries its own images, concepts, values, and ‘codes,’ the creative person brings together– ‘bisociates’– two diverse matrices not normally connected."

– Joseph J. Feeney, S.J.

Robert Stone in A Flag for Sunrise
(Knopf hardcover, 1981)–

"The eye you see him with is the same eye with which he sees you."

– Father Egan on page 333

Pablo on page 425–

"'…You know, he told me– that old man told me– the eye you look at it with, well, that's the eye it sees you with. That's what he told me.'

Holliwell was moved to recall an experiment he had once read about; he had clipped the report of it for his class. An experimenter endeavoring to observe chimpanzee behavior had fashioned a spy hole in the door of the animals' chamber through which he might watch them unobserved. Putting his eye to it, he had seen nothing more than what he finally identified as the eye of a chimpanzee on the other side of the door. Ape stuff."

More ape stuff from a Jesuit–

"This Jack, joke, poor potsherd, patch, matchwood, immortal diamond,
                Is immortal diamond."

— Gerard Manley Hopkins,
"That Nature is a Heraclitean Fire
and of the comfort of the Resurrection
"

More ape stuff from myself–

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10/100117-TradingPlaces.jpg

Problem: Perform this transformation
by combining the sorts of permutations allowed
in the diamond puzzle. A solution: click here.

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Tuesday March 10, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:11 PM

Immortal Diamond
continued:

"That flower unseen, that gem of purest ray,
Bright thoughts uncut by men:
Strange that you need but speak them, Thomas Gray,
And the mind skips and dives beyond its ken,

Finding at once the wild supposed bloom,
Or in the imagined cave
Some pulse of crystal staving off the gloom
As covertly as phosphorus in a grave."

— From "In a Churchyard," by Richard Wilbur

"A metaphysical assertion of this kind is the idea of the 'diamond body,' the indestructible breath-body which develops in the Golden Flower, or in the square inch space."

The Secret of the Golden Flower, by Richard Wilhelm, Carl Gustav Jung, and Hua-Yang Liu, second rev. ed., publ. by Routledge, 1999, pp. 130-131

For more about these concepts, see the work cited.

See also
Diamond, Flower, Space.

 

Sunday, February 11, 2007

Sunday February 11, 2007

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:56 AM
George Sadek, 78,
Graphic Design Educator,
Dies

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070211-GeorgeSadek.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Sadek died on Feb. 5.

Related material:

“Harvard Design” (Feb. 6),

“Geometry and Death”
(entries of December 2006)
,

“Release Date”
in “Immortal Diamond
(Feb. 5 four years ago).

The design over Sadek’s
head is a St. Bridget’s cross.

(See the “Release Date”
link above.)

Sunday, March 26, 2006

Sunday March 26, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 5:00 PM

Rhinestone Cowboy

By GREG RISLING
Associated Press Writer

LOS ANGELES — Singer Buck Owens, the flashy rhinestone cowboy who shaped the sound of country music… died Saturday. He was 76.

From Log24, Feb. 2, 2003:

Head White House speechwriter Michael Gerson:

“In the last two weeks, I’ve been returning to Hopkins.  Even in the ‘world’s wildfire,’ he asserts that ‘this Jack, joke, poor potsherd, patch, matchwood, immortal diamond,/Is immortal diamond.’ A comfort.”

— Vanity Fair, May 2002, page 162

Related material:

See the five Log24 entries ending with The Diamond as Big as the Monster (Dec. 21, 2005).

Note particularly the following:

From Fitzgerald’s
The Diamond as Big as the Ritz:

    “Now,” said John eagerly, “turn out your pocket and let’s see what jewels you brought along. If you made a good selection we three ought to live comfortably all the rest of our lives.”
     Obediently Kismine put her hand in her pocket and tossed two handfuls of glittering stones before him.
    “Not so bad,” cried John, enthusiastically. “They aren’t very big, but– Hello!” His expression changed as he held one of them up to the declining sun. “Why, these aren’t diamonds! There’s something the matter!”
    “By golly!” exclaimed Kismine, with a startled look. “What an idiot I am!”
    “Why, these are rhinestones!” cried John.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051123-Star.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051221-Reba1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Wednesday, June 8, 2005

Wednesday June 8, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:00 PM

Kernel of Eternity

Today is the feast day of Saint Gerard Manley Hopkins, “immortal diamond.”

“At that instant he saw, in one blaze of light, an image of unutterable conviction, the reason why the artist works and lives and has his being–the reward he seeks–the only reward he really cares about, without which there is nothing. It is to snare the spirits of mankind in nets of magic, to make his life prevail through his creation, to wreak the vision of his life, the rude and painful substance of his own experience, into the congruence of blazing and enchanted images that are themselves the core of life, the essential pattern whence all other things proceed, the kernel of eternity.”

— Thomas Wolfe, Of Time and the River

“… the stabiliser of an octad preserves the affine space structure on its complement, and (from the construction) induces AGL(4,2) on it. (It induces A8 on the octad, the kernel of this action being the translation group of the affine space.)”

— Peter J. Cameron,
The Geometry of the Mathieu Groups (pdf)

“… donc Dieu existe, réponse!

— attributed, some say falsely, to Leonhard Euler

Saturday, March 12, 2005

Saturday March 12, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 5:09 AM
Three Eleanors

Continued from March 10:

For some children…

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050310-Burton.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

It takes three Eleanors.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050310-Eleanors.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
1             2              3

For Alice, a beautiful child

who died in London
on Tuesday
at 72:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050312-Form.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Today’s New York Times says that
Alice, the author of Fairy Tale,
was a
“passionately traditional Catholic.”

For related material, see
Immortal Diamond:
O’Hara, Hopkins, and Joyce
.

See also the conflict between Trudeau’s
  “diamond theory” and
“story theory”
of truth
,

and Suzanne Keen‘s article from the
Catholic publication Commonweal:

Getting to Truth by Lying.

Wednesday, March 2, 2005

Wednesday March 2, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 2:22 PM

White Stone

"I have stolen more quotes and thoughts and purely elegant little starbursts of writing from the Book of Revelation than anything else in the English language– and it is not because I am a biblical scholar, or because of any religious faith, but because I love the wild power of the language and the purity of the madness that governs it and makes it music."

— Hunter S. Thompson, Author's Note, Generation of Swine

In memory of Peter Foy,
who died in Las Vegas
on 2/17

The image “http://log24.com/log/pix05/050302-Peter2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Revelation 2:17:

"And I will give him a white stone…."

The image “http://log24.com/log/pix05/050302-Diamond1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Related material:

2003 2/17: "immortal diamond"
2004 2/17:  "hard core"           
2005 2/17:  "the diamond"       

For an "elegant starburst," see

"Starflight," from 10/10, 2004

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050302-S.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

the date of
Christopher Reeve's death.

See also
Revelation 10:10

"And I took the little book
out of the angel's hand,
and ate it up; and it was in my mouth
sweet as honey: and as soon as I had
eaten it, my belly was bitter."

For the relationship of this verse to
the style of Hunter Thompson, see

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050302-Apo.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

From the Department of Justice:
"LSD generally is taken by mouth.
The drug is colorless and odorless
but has a slightly bitter taste."
Among the street terms for LSD
is "Superman."

Friday, January 2, 2004

Friday January 2, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:28 PM

Music for Dunne’s Wake

Heaven was kind of a hat on the universe,
a lid that kept everything underneath it
where it belonged.”

 — Carrie Fisher,
Postcards from the Edge

     

720 in  
the Book”

and
Paradise

Musical Note: A Star is Born

Natalie Wood played a six-year-old
in “Miracle on 34th Street,”
six factorial equals 720,
and Wood was born on 7/20, 1938.

“How I love music.”

— John O’Hara, Hope of Heaven, 1938

For related metaphors, see
Immortal Diamond,
The Diamond Archetype, and
the first log24.net entry
for July 20, 2002.

Friday January 2, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:14 PM

Dunne's Wake:

What, and Give Up Show Biz?

"Dying is easy. Comedy is hard."

— Saying attributed to Edmund Gwenn, star of "Miracle on 34th Street," and also attributed to "Noel Coward, David Garrick, William Holden, Edmund Kean, Marcel Marceau, Groucho Marx, and Oscar Wilde."

See also yesterday's entry on the Dark Lady.  For more on Santa and the Dark Lady, see my archive for Aug.-Sept. 2002.

"Drink up, sweet.  You gotta go some.  How I love music.  Frère Jacques, Cuernavaca, ach du lieber August.  All languages.  A walking Berlitz.  Berlitz sounds like you with that champagne, my sweet, or how you're gonna sound."

Hope of Heaven, by John O'Hara,
"another acidic writer to whom he
[John Gregory Dunne]
was often compared"
(Adam Bernstein, Washington Post)

For some context for the Hope of Heaven quotation, see Immortal Diamond: O'Hara, Hopkins, and Joyce, or click on the adding machine in yesterday's entry.

For more on miracles and the afterlife, see my archive for September 2002.

Thursday, November 13, 2003

Thursday November 13, 2003

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:30 PM

The Tables of Time

Implied by previous two entries:

“This Jack, joke, poor potsherd, patch, matchwood, immortal diamond,

                Is immortal diamond.”
 

— Gerard Manley Hopkins,

That Nature is a Heraclitean Fire

and of the Comfort of the Resurrection

New York Times, Nov. 13, 2003:

Peace Rune
Hexagram 11,
Jan. 6, 1989

Picnic Symbol 

Picnic site symbol,
British Sea Scouts

See, too, Art Wars and Time Fold.

Thursday, July 31, 2003

Thursday July 31, 2003

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 6:41 PM

Killer Radio

"See the girl with the diamond ring?
 She knows how to shake that thing."

— Jerry Lee "Killer" Lewis on
    KHYI 95.3 FM, Plano, Texas,
    at about 5:12 PM EDT 7/31/03,
    introduced by DJ Allen Peck Sr.

"And on this point I pass the same judgment as those who say that geometricians give them nothing new by these rules, because they possessed them in reality, but confounded with a multitude of others, either useless or false, from which they could not discriminate them, as those who, seeking a diamond of great price amidst a number of false ones, but from which they know not how to distinguish it, should boast, in holding them all together, of possessing the true one equally with him who without pausing at this mass of rubbish lays his hand upon the costly stone which they are seeking and for which they do not throw away the rest."

— Blaise Pascal, De l'Esprit Géométrique

"When the light came she was sitting on the bed beside an open suitcase, toying with her diamond rings.  She saw the light first in the depths of the largest stone."

— Paul Preuss, Broken Symmetries,
    scene at Diamond Head, Oahu, Hawaii

Now playing (6:41 PM EDT) on Killer Radio:

"Jack of Diamonds, that's
 a hard card to find."

"This Jack, joke, poor potsherd, patch, matchwood, immortal diamond…."

— Gerard Manley Hopkins, Society of Jesus

Perhaps Sam Phillips was twanged by a Hawaiian guitar. (See previous two entries.)

 

The Big Time

"The place outside the cosmos where I and my pals do our nursing job I simply call the Place.  A lot of my nursing consists of amusing and humanizing Soldiers fresh back from raids into time. In fact, my formal title is Entertainer…."

The Big Time,
    by Fritz Leiber

A Story That Works

  • "There is the dark, eternally silent, unknown universe;
  • there are the friend-enemy minds shouting and whispering their tales and always seeking the three miracles —
    • that minds should really touch, or
    • that the silent universe should speak, tell minds a story, or (perhaps the same thing)
    • that there should be a story that works, that is all hard facts, all reality, with no illusions and no fantasy;
  • and lastly, there is lonely, story-telling, wonder-questing, mortal me."

    Fritz Leiber in "The Button Molder"

 

 

See also "Top Ten Most Overheard Comments by new KHYI listeners" at Miss Lana's Anything Page, entry for

Pearl Harbor Day, December 7, 2002.
 

Sunday, June 8, 2003

Sunday June 8, 2003

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:04 AM

Of Time and the River

Today is the feast day of Saint Gerard Manley Hopkins, “immortal diamond.”

“At that instant he saw, in one blaze of light, an image of unutterable conviction, the reason why the artist works and lives and has his being–the reward he seeks–the only reward he really cares about, without which there is nothing. It is to snare the spirits of mankind in nets of magic, to make his life prevail through his creation, to wreak the vision of his life, the rude and painful substance of his own experience, into the congruence of blazing and enchanted images that are themselves the core of life, the essential pattern whence all other things proceed, the kernel of eternity.”

Thomas Wolfe, Of Time and the River

Thomas Wolfe

“entered the university at Chapel Hill at fifteen ‘an awkward, unhappy misfit.’ By the time he graduated, he was editor of the college newspaper….”

Jeff MacNelly, who died on this date in the Year of Our Lord 2000,

“in 1977 started drawing the comic strip ‘Shoe‘…. The strip was named in honor of the legendary Jim Shumaker, for whom MacNelly worked at the Chapel Hill Weekly.” 

From my Monday, June 2, 2003 entry:

Two quotations from “The Diamond Project“:

“We all know that something is eternal,” the Stage Manager says. “And it ain’t houses and it ain’t names, and it ain’t earth, and it ain’t even stars—everybody knows in their bones that something is eternal, and that something has to do with human beings.”
— John Lahr, review of “Our Town 

“Set me as a seal upon your heart, as a seal upon your arm; for love is strong as death, passion fierce as the grave.  Its flashes are flashes of fire, a raging flame.”
Song of Solomon

Here are some other thoughts from the same date, but a different time, fictional time, Faulkner time:

June Second, 1910

Where the shadow of the bridge fell I could see down for a long way, but not as far as the bottom. When you leave a leaf in water a long time after a while the tissue will be gone and the delicate fibers waving slow as the motion of sleep. They dont touch one another, no matter how knotted up they once were, no matter how close they lay once to the bones. And maybe when He says Rise the eyes will come floating up too, out of the deep quiet and the sleep, to look on glory.

— William Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury

The concluding link from my June 2, 2003, entry furnishes a clue to the timelessness of Quentin Compson‘s thoughts above:

Glory… Song of Songs 8. 7-8

From the King James Bible‘s rendition of the Song of Songs:

8:7  Many waters cannot quench love, neither can the floods drown it: if a man would give all the substance of his house for love, it would utterly be contemned.
8:8  We have a little sister, and she hath no breasts: what shall we do for our sister in the day when she shall be spoken for?

For Quentin Compson’s thoughts on his little sister Caddy, consult the online hypertext edition of

Thursday, March 13, 2003

Thursday March 13, 2003

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:44 PM

ART WARS:

From The New Yorker, issue of March 17, 2003, Clive James on Aldous Huxley:

The Perennial Philosophy, his 1945 book compounding all the positive thoughts of West and East into a tutti-frutti of moral uplift, was the equivalent, in its day, of It Takes a Village: there was nothing in it to object to, and that, of course, was the objection.”

For a cultural artifact that is less questionably perennial, see Huxley’s story “Young Archimedes.”

Plato, Pythagoras, and
the diamond figure

Plato’s Diamond in the Meno
Plato as a precursor of Gerard Manley Hopkins’s “immortal diamond.” An illustration shows the ur-diamond figure.

Plato’s Diamond Revisited
Ivars Peterson’s Nov. 27, 2000 column “Square of the Hypotenuse” which discusses the diamond figure as used by Pythagoras (perhaps) and Plato. Other references to the use of Plato’s diamond in the proof of the Pythagorean theorem:

Huxley:

“… and he proceeded to prove the theorem of Pythagoras — not in Euclid’s way, but by the simpler and more satisfying method which was, in all probability, employed by Pythagoras himself….
‘You see,’ he said, ‘it seemed to me so beautiful….’
I nodded. ‘Yes, it’s very beautiful,’ I said — ‘it’s very beautiful indeed.'”
— Aldous Huxley, “Young Archimedes,” in Collected Short Stories, Harper, 1957, pp. 246 – 247

Heath:

Sir Thomas L. Heath, in his commentary on Euclid I.47, asks how Pythagoreans discovered the Pythagorean theorem and the irrationality of the diagonal of a unit square. His answer? Plato’s diamond.
(See Heath, Sir Thomas Little (1861-1940),
The thirteen books of Euclid’s Elements translated from the text of Heiberg with introduction and commentary. Three volumes. University Press, Cambridge, 1908. Second edition: University Press, Cambridge, 1925. Reprint: Dover Publications, New York, 1956.

Other sites on the alleged
“diamond” proof of Pythagoras

Colorful diagrams at Cut-the-Knot

Illustrated legend of the diamond proof

Babylonian version of the diamond proof

For further details of Huxley’s story, see

The Practice of Mathematics,

Part I, by Robert P. Langlands, from a lecture series at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton.

From the New Yorker Contributors page for St. Patrick’s Day, 2003:

Clive James (Books, p. 143) has a new collection, As of This Writing: The Essential Essays, 1968-2002, which will be published in June.”

See also my entry “The Boys from Uruguay” and the later entry “Lichtung!” on the Deutsche Schule Montevideo in Uruguay.

Wednesday, March 12, 2003

Wednesday March 12, 2003

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:03 AM

Daimon Theory

Today is allegedly the anniversary of the canonization, in 1622, of two rather important members of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits):

Ignatius Loyola
  Click here for Loyola’s legacy of strategic intelligence.

Francis Xavier
  Click here for Xavier’s legacy of strategic stupidity.

We can thank (or blame) a Jesuit (Gerard Manley Hopkins) for the poetic phrase “immortal diamond.”  He may have been influenced by Plato, who has Socrates using a diamond figure in an argument for the immortality of the soul.  Confusingly, Socrates also talked about his “daimon” (pronounced dye-moan).  Combining these similar-sounding concepts, we have Doctor Stephen A. Diamond writing about daimons — a choice of author and topic that neatly combines the strategic intelligence of Loyola with the strategic stupidity of Xavier.

The cover illustration is perhaps not of Dr. Diamond himself.

A link between diamond theory and daimon theory is furnished by the charitable legacy of the non-practicing Jew Walter Annenberg.

For Annenberg and diamond theory, see this site on the elementary geometry of quilt blocks, which credits the Annenberg Foundation for support.

For Annenberg and daimon theory, see this site on Socrates, which has a similar Annenberg support credit.

Advanced disciples of Annenberg can learn much from the Perseus site about daimon theory. Let us pray that Abrahamic religious bigotry does not stand in their way.  Less advanced disciples of Annenberg may find fulfillment in teaching children the beauty of elementary 4×4 quilt-block symmetry.  Let us pray that academic bigotry does not prevent these same children, when they have grown older, from learning the deeper, and more difficult, beauties of diamond theory.

 
Daimon Theory

 
Diamond Theory

Monday, February 17, 2003

Monday February 17, 2003

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:36 PM

Saint Faggot’s Day

“During the European Inquisitions, faggot referred to the sticks used to set fires for burning heretics, or people who opposed the teachings of the Catholic Church. Heretics were required to gather bundles of sticks (‘faggots’) and carry them to the fire that was being built for them. Heretics who changed their beliefs to avoid being killed were forced to wear a faggot design embroidered on their sleeve, to show everyone that they had opposed the Church.”

— Handout


Cover illustration
by Stephen Savage

N.Y. Times Feb. 2, 2003



‘A Box of Matches’:
A Miniaturist’s
Novel of Details

In Nicholson Baker’s novel,
things not worth noticing
eventually become
all there is to notice.

Head White House speechwriter Michael Gerson:

“In the last two weeks, I’ve been returning to Hopkins.  Even in the ‘world’s wildfire,’ he asserts that ‘this Jack, joke, poor potsherd, patch, matchwood, immortal diamond,/Is immortal diamond.’ A comfort.”
— Vanity Fair, May 2002, page 162

“At midnight on the Emperor’s pavement flit
Flames that no faggot feeds….”

— William Butler Yeats, “Byzantium”

On this date in 1600, Saint Giordano Bruno was burned at the stake for heresy by the Roman Catholic Church.

He was resurrected by Saint Frances Yates, who went to her reward on the feast day of Saint Michael and All Angels, 1981.

Sunday, February 2, 2003

Sunday February 2, 2003

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:00 PM

Steering a Space-Plane

Head White House speechwriter Michael Gerson:

“In the last two weeks, I’ve been returning to Hopkins.  Even in the ‘world’s wildfire,’ he asserts that ‘this Jack, joke, poor potsherd, patch, matchwood, immortal diamond,/Is immortal diamond.’ A comfort.”
— Vanity Fair, May 2002, page 162

Yesterday’s note, “Time and Eternity,” supplies the “immortal diamond” part of this meditation.  For the “matchwood” part, see the cover of The New York Times Book Review of February 2 (Candlemas), 2003:


Cover illustration
by Stephen Savage

N.Y. Times Feb. 2, 2003



‘A Box of Matches’:
A Miniaturist’s
Novel of Details

In Nicholson Baker’s novel,
things not worth noticing
eventually become
all there is to notice.

See also the Times’s excerpt from Baker‘s first chapter,
about “steering a space-plane.”

For the relationship of Hopkins to Eastern religions,
see “Out of Inscape,” by Robert Morris.

Tuesday, January 28, 2003

Tuesday January 28, 2003

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:11 PM

State of the Communion

Relevant readings:

  • Definition of the communion of saints in the Catholic Encylopedia

    “In that communion there is no loss of individuality, yet such an interdependence that the saints are ‘members one of another’ (Rom., xii, 5)….”

  • Ephesians 4:16
  • “…the whole body fitly joined together and compacted by that which every joint supplieth….”

  • A Game Designer’s Holy Grail —

    “Herman Melville described the exact process beautifully in his novel, Mardi:

    ‘In me, many worthies recline, and converse. I list to St. Paul who argues the doubts of Montaigne…'”

  • Invitation to the HipBone Games —

    “…man is seen as he is sub specie aeternitatis, an ‘immortal diamond.'”

  • Your Hip Bone Connected —

    “Now hear the word of the Lord” 

Monday, January 20, 2003

Monday January 20, 2003

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 5:00 PM

Shine On, Robinson Jeffers

"…be in nothing so moderate as in love of man, 
      a clever servant, insufferable master.
There is the trap that catches noblest spirits,
     that caught — they say — God, when he walked on earth."
Shine, Perishing Republic, by Robinson Jeffers

Robinson Jeffers died at Big Sur, California, on January 20, 1962 — a year to the day after Robert Frost spoke at the Kennedy inauguration.

"The poetry of Robinson Jeffers shines with a diamond's brilliance when he depicts Nature's beauty and magnificence.   His verse also flashes with a diamond's hardness when he portrays human pain and folly."
Gary Suttle  

"Praise Him, He hath conferred aesthetic distance
Upon our appetites, and on the bloody
Mess of our birthright, our unseemly need,
Imposed significant form. Through Him the brutes
Enter the pure Euclidean kingdom of number…."
— Howard Nemerov, 
   Grace To Be Said at the Supermarket 

"Across my foundering deck shone 
A beacon, an eternal beam. | Flesh fade, and mortal trash 
Fáll to the resíduary worm; | world's wildfire, leave but ash: 
In a flash, at a trumpet crash, 
I am all at once what Christ is |, since he was what I am, and 
Thís Jack, jóke, poor pótsherd, | patch, matchwood,
    immortal diamond
Is immortal diamond."
— Gerard Manley Hopkins,
    That Nature is a Heraclitean Fire and of the Comfort of the Resurrection

"In the last two weeks, I've been returning to Hopkins.  Even in the 'world's wildfire,' he asserts that 'this Jack, joke, poor potsherd, patch, matchwood, immortal diamond,/Is immortal diamond.' A comfort."
— Michael Gerson, head White House speechwriter,
    in Vanity Fair, May 2002, page 162

"There's none but truth can stead you.  Christ is truth."
— Gerard Manley Hopkins

"The rock cannot be broken.  It is the truth."
— Wallace Stevens 

"My ghost you needn't look for; it is probably
Here, but a dark one, deep in the granite…."
— Robinson Jeffers, Tor House

On this date in 1993, the inauguration day of William Jefferson Clinton, Audrey Hepburn died.

"…today, the Rock cries out to us, clearly, forcefully…."
Maya Angelou, January 20, 1993

"So, purposing each moment to retire,
She linger'd still. Meantime, across the moors,
Had come young Porphyro, with heart on fire"
— John Keats, The Eve of St. Agnes (January 20), IX

Top view of
ordinary
diamond

Top view of
Hearts On Fire
diamond

Advertising Copy:

What you see with a Hearts On Fire diamond is an unequalled marriage of math and physics, resulting in the world's most perfectly cut diamond.

 

"Eightpointed symmetrical signs are ancient symbols for the Venus goddess or the planet Venus as either the Morning star or the Evening star."
Symbols.com

"Set me as a seal upon your heart, as a seal upon your arm; for love is strong as death, passion fierce as the grave.  Its flashes are flashes of fire, a raging flame."
Song of Solomon

"The last words from the people in the towers and on the planes, over and over again, were 'I love you.'  Over and over again, the message was the same, 'I love you.' …. Perhaps this is the loudest chorus from The Rock:  we are learning just how powerful love really is, even in the face of death."
The Rev. Kenneth E. Kovacs

"Then I'll get on my knees and pray
We don't get fooled again."
The Who 

See also my note, "Bright Star," of October 23, 2002.

 

Saturday, August 24, 2002

Saturday August 24, 2002

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:33 PM

Cruciatus in Crucem

From Battlefield Vacations, Edinburgh:

On the film “Braveheart” —

If you’ve ever wondered about what exactly “drawn and quartered” means, there’s a good demonstration at the end.

 
From my journal note of June 28, 2002:
 
Page 162 of the May 2002 issue of Vanity Fair Magazine —

NIGHT  TABLE READING

MICHAEL GERSON
Head White House speechwriter —

God’s Grandeur and Other Poems, by Gerard Manley Hopkins (Dover)

“In the last two weeks, I’ve been returning to Hopkins.  Even in the ‘world’s wildfire,” he asserts that

‘this Jack, joke, poor potsherd, patch, matchwood, immortal diamond,
Is immortal diamond.’

A comfort.”

 
“Cruciatus in crucem.”
— President Jed Bartlet, The West Wing  (Episode 2.22 , “Two Cathedrals,”
original airdate May 16, 2001, 9:00 PM EST)
 
For the Latin meaning of this phrase, see
Quarreling with God.
 
For the complete script of this episode, see
Two Cathedrals.
 
See also my journal note of August 3, 2002, “The Cruciatus Curse,” below.

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