Log24

Sunday, April 15, 2018

Blue Fire

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:00 PM

"By means of an idea we can see
the idea cloaked in the passing parade."

James Hillman in  A Blue Fire 

Related material:  Cloak and Dagger

See as well Barbara Rose.

Sunday, December 17, 2017

Concrete Universals

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:45 PM

The remarks on universals in the previous post linked to the following
note by James Hillman:

James Hillman, Re-Visioning Psychology
Harper Collins, 1977, p. 155 —

"Myths also make concrete particulars into universals,
so that each image, name, thing in my life when
experienced mythically takes on universal sense,
and all abstract universals, the grand ideas of
human fate, are presented as concrete actions." 
[See note 48.]

Note 48:  Cf. P. Wheelwright's discussion of concrete universality
in The Burning Fountain  (Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University
Press, 1968), pp. 52-54.

For Wheelwright's discussion, see the following excerpts from his book:

Pages 50-5152-5354-55.

Sunday, June 15, 2014

Aaron Eckhart Strikes Deep

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 AM

“Even paranoids have real enemies.”

— Attributed to Delmore Schwartz

“There is a difference as to whether you are describing paranoia
or whether you in fact are paranoid yourself.”

— The late Frank Schirrmacher,  dw.de , July 2, 2013.

Schirrmacher reportedly died on Thursday, June 12, 2014.
See that date in this journal.

Paranoia is, of course, a fertile field for politicians and filmmakers:

Related material in this journal:

I, Frankenstein (May 15, 2014) and, for the Eckhart film “Erased,”
Hour of the Wolf (Nov. 9, 2006).

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Blackboard Jungle

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Continues

Other Times content — ("O Me!") —

Other non -Times content — ("O Life!") —

The author of the above pairing has suggested a topic she
seems ill-prepared to discuss — poetry and psychosis.

Her background is in grade-school education.
For one possible result when grade-school education
meets psychosis, see Log24 posts tagged Danvers.

For better-informed discussion of the relation of poetry  
to psychological states that are more normal, see (for instance)
Roberts Avens on James Hillman.

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

For East St. Louis

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 PM

IMAGE- Learning from Miles Davis in the NY Times, 8:25 PM Oct. 9, 2012

See also Miles Davis in this journal and
the posts of Sunday, November 21, 2004.

"We’ll build in sonnets pretty roomes;
As well a well wrought urne becomes
The greatest ashes, as half-acre tombes."

— The Canonization*

Whoosh.

* By John Donne. See also a piece by
  James Hillman that might have been
  titled Notes for Doctor Sax.

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Incommensurables

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:48 AM

(Continued from Midsummer Eve)

"At times, bullshit can only be countered with superior bullshit."

— Norman Mailer, March 3, 1992, PBS transcript

"Just because it is a transition between incommensurables, the transition between competing paradigms cannot be made a step at a time, forced by logic and neutral experience. Like the gestalt switch, it must occur all at once (though not necessarily in an instant) or not at all."

Thomas Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions , 1962, as quoted in The Enneagram of Paradigm Shifting

"In the spiritual traditions from which Jung borrowed the term, it is not the SYMMETRY of mandalas that is all-important, as Jung later led us to believe. It is their capacity to reveal the asymmetry that resides at the very heart of symmetry." 

The Enneagram as Mandala

I have little respect for Enneagram enthusiasts, but they do at times illustrate Mailer's maxim.

My own interests are in the purely mathematical properties of the number nine, as well as those of the next square, sixteen.

Those who prefer bullshit may investigate non-mathematical properties of sixteen by doing a Google image search on MBTI.

For bullshit involving nine, see (for instance) Einsatz  in this journal.

For non-bullshit involving nine, sixteen, and "asymmetry that resides at the very heart of symmetry," see Monday's Mapping Problem continued. (The nine occurs there as the symmetric  figures in the lower right nine-sixteenths of the triangular analogs  diagram.)

For non-bullshit involving psychological and philosophical terminology, see James Hillman's Re-Visioning Psychology .

In particular, see Hillman's "An Excursion on Differences Between Soul and Spirit."

Saturday, January 7, 2012

Fearful Cold Intelligence

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:00 AM

"Dreams are sleep's watchful brother, of death's fraternity,
heralds, watchmen of that coming night, and our attitude
toward them may be modeled upon Hades, receiving, hospitable,
yet relentlessly deepening, attuned to the nocturne, dusky, and
with a fearful cold intelligence that gives permanent shelter
in his house to the incurable conditions of human being."

James Hillman, conclusion of
The Dream and the Underworld  (Harper & Row, 1979)

In memory of Raymond Edward Alan Christopher Paley

IMAGE- 'Note on the Mathieu Group M12' by Marshall Hall, Jr.

Related material— Mathieu Symmetry.

Sunday, October 30, 2011

Sunday School

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 AM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111028-NYT-JamesHillman-360w.jpg

  See also "James Hillman" in this journal.

  (After clicking, scroll down.)

Friday, October 28, 2011

The Soul’s Code

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 7:20 AM

James Hillman, NYT obituary on Feast of St. Jude, 2011

James Hillman reportedly died on Thursday, October 27, 2011.

For some commentary, see Wednesday's link to 779

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111028-SoulsCode.JPG

Daimon
  Theory

Diamond Theory

Friday, January 14, 2011

Ironic Butterfly

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:07 AM

David Brooks's column today quotes Niebuhr. From the same source—
Reinhold Niebuhr, The Irony of American History

Chapter 8: The Significance of Irony

Any interpretation of historical patterns and configurations raises the question whether the patterns, which the observer discerns, are "objectively" true or are imposed upon the vast stuff of history by his imagination. History might be likened to the confusion of spots on the cards used by psychiatrists in a Rorschach test. The patient is asked to report what he sees in these spots; and he may claim to find the outlines of an elephant, butterfly or frog. The psychiatrist draws conclusions from these judgments about the state of the patient’s imagination rather than about the actual configuration of spots on the card. Are historical patterns equally subjective?
….
The Biblical view of human nature and destiny moves within the framework of irony with remarkable consistency. Adam and Eve are expelled from the Garden of Eden because the first pair allowed "the serpent" to insinuate that, if only they would defy the limits which God had set even for his most unique creature, man, they would be like God. All subsequent human actions are infected with a pretentious denial of human limits. But the actions of those who are particularly wise or mighty or righteous fall under special condemnation. The builders of the Tower of Babel are scattered by a confusion of tongues because they sought to build a tower which would reach into the heavens.

Niebuhr's ironic butterfly may be seen in the context of last
Tuesday's post Shining and of last Saturday's noon post True Grid

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110114-AlderTilleyColored.gif

The "butterfly" in the above picture is a diagram showing the 12 lines* of the Hesse configuration from True Grid.

It is also a reference to James Hillman's classical image (see Shining) of the psyche, or soul, as a butterfly.

Fanciful, yes, but this is in exact accordance with Hillman's remarks on the soul (as opposed to the spirit— see Tuesday evening's post).

The 12-line butterfly figure may be viewed as related to the discussions of archetypes and universals in Hillman's Re-Visioning Psychology  and in Charles Williams's The Place of the Lion . It is a figure intended here to suggest philosophy, not entertainment.

Niebuhr and Williams, if not the more secular Hillman, might agree that those who value entertainment above all else may look forward to a future in Hell (or, if they are lucky, Purgatory). Perhaps such a future might include a medley of Bob Lind's "Elusive Butterfly" and Iron Butterfly's "In-a-Gadda-da-Vida."

* Three horizontal, three vertical, two diagonal, and four arc-shaped.

Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Soul and Spirit

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:29 PM

This morning's post, "Shining," gave James Hillman's 1976 remarks
on the distinction between soul  and spirit .

The following images may help illustrate these concepts.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110111-BlockDesignsAndGeometry.jpg

The distinction as illustrated by Jeff Bridges —

Soul

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110110-CrazyHeart225.jpg

Spirit

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110111-BridgesObadiahSm.jpg

The mirror has two faces (at least).

Postscript from a story, "The Zahir," in the Borges manner,
  by Mark Jason Dominus (programmer of the quilt designs above)—

"I  left that madhouse gratefully."

Dominus is also the author of…

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110111-HigherOrderPerl.gif

Click for details.

Shining*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:07 AM

(Continued from January 3rd)

Readings from James Hillman's 1976 classic Re-Visioning Psychology

On the "eye of the soul" and on spirit  as clarity

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110111-Hillman246.gif

On the distinction between spirit  and soul  (pp. 67-70)—

Click to enlarge.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110111-HillmanExcursionSm.gif

* Here "Shining" refers to the recent pop-philosophy book All Things Shining , not to Stephen King.  

Monday, January 3, 2011

Shining

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:07 AM

For the authors of the new book All Things Shining

See the discussions of "concrete universals" in James Hillman's Re-Visioning Psychology  and in Donald Phillip Verene's Vico and Joyce

IMAGE- The imaginative universal in Vico and Joyce

The index to All Things Shining  contains no entries for Hillman (or his mentor Jung), Verene, Joyce, Vico, or the word "universal."

It does, however, contain four references to an example  of a universal —

whiteness, 161, 169-173, 175, 178

See also "whiteness" in this  journal.

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Horseness

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

"Art has to reveal to us ideas, formless spiritual essences."

— A character clearly talking nonsense, from the National Library section of James Joyce's Ulysses

"Unsheathe your dagger definitions. Horseness is the whatness of allhorse."

— A thought of Stephen Dedalus in the same Ulysses  section

For a representation of horseness related to Singer's dagger definitions in Saturday evening's post, see Generating the Octad Generator and Art Wars: Geometry as Conceptual Art.

More seriously, Joyce's "horseness" is related to the problem of universals. For an illuminating approach to universals from a psychological point of view, see James Hillman's Re-Visioning Psychology  (Harper Collins, 1977). (See particularly pages 154-157.)

Saturday, September 19, 2009

Saturday September 19, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:22 AM

Slouching
Towards Kristen

Kristen Wiig as Michele Bachmann, SNL Thursday update, Sept. 17, 2009

Jerusalem Post Interview
with Charles Krauthammer

by Hilary Leilea Krieger, JPost Correspondent, Washington

Krauthammer, a columnist for The Washington Post, is a winner of the Irving Kristol award.

Jerusalem Post, June 10, 2009:

Can you talk a little bit about your own Jewish upbringing and sense of Jewishness, and how that influences you? I assume it’s a factor in this particular project.

I grew up in a Modern Orthodox home [in Montreal]. I went to Jewish day school right through high school, so half of my day was spent speaking Hebrew from age six to 16. I studied thousands of hours of Talmud. My father thought I didn’t get enough Talmud at school, so I took the extra Talmud class at school and he had a rabbi come to the house three nights a week. One of those nights was Saturday night, so in synagogue Saturday morning my brother and I would pray very hard for snow so he wouldn’t be able to come on Saturday night and we could watch hockey night in Canada. That’s where I learned about prayer.

That didn’t seem to you to be a prayer that was likely to go unanswered?

Yeah, I was giving it a shot to see what side God was on.

And what did you determine?

It rarely snowed.

************************************

More on Krauthammer’s Canadian childhood:

“His parents were Orthodox and sent him to
 Hebrew day school. He also took
 private Gomorrah lessons twice a week.”

— “Charles Krauthammer: Prize Writer,”
     by Mitchell Bard

************************************

Also in the Jerusalem Post interview:

…. What, then, did you mean by a Jewish sensibility?

“…. In literature it’s an interesting question, what’s a Jewish novel?”

My Prayer:

Private Gomorrah lessons
with Kristen.

Background:

“Heaven Can Wait”
at Haaretz.com

Happy Rosh Hashanah
(and Gemara).

Update, 5:01 AM Sept. 19

Before becoming a writer,
Krauthammer was, his
Washington Post biography says,
a resident and then chief resident
in psychiatry at
Massachusetts General Hospital.

Related Metaphors

This morning’s New York Times:

NY Times obituary for Irving Kristol, with squirrel-and-nuts ad

MicheleBachmann.com this morning:

Squirrel with acorns at Michele Bachmann home page, Sept. 19, 2009

See also:

James Hillman’s “acorn theory
of personality development
(yesterday’s entry).

Friday, September 18, 2009

Friday September 18, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:22 PM
An Alternative

to the worldview
of Dan Brown:

'The Soul's Code,' by James Hillman

Saturday, August 29, 2009

Saturday August 29, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:00 PM
Continued from
Father’s Day
  last year–

Shoe cartoon, detail, Sunday, June 15, 2008

I Ching hexagram 48, The Well

“For further details,
 click on the well.”

From the above link:

James Hillman

“The kind of movement Olson urges is
 an inward deepening of the image,
an in-sighting of the superimposed
 levels of significance within it.
This is the very mode that Jung
suggested for grasping dreams–
 not as a sequence in time,
but as revolving around
 a nodal complex.”

And from Feb. 29, 2008:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix08/080229-Doonesbury3.jpg

and the following day:

Heraclitus: '...so deep is its logos'

— Heraclitus

Monday, June 1, 2009

Monday June 1, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:31 AM

“What’s going on”

Marvin Gaye

“The action is in the plot, inaccessible to introspection, and only the characters know what’s going on.”

James Hillman, quoted at David Lavery’s weblog.

See also

Badge ID

Click on image
 for further details.

Sunday, December 16, 2007

Sunday December 16, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:09 PM
 
Mad Phaedrus
Meets Mad Ezra

 

"Plato's Good was a fixed and eternal and unmoving Idea, whereas for the rhetoricians it was not an Idea at all. The Good was not a form of reality. It was reality itself, ever changing, ultimately unknowable in any kind of fixed, rigid way." –Phaedrus in Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

This apparent conflict between eternity and time, fixity and motion, permanence and change, is resolved by the philosophy of the I Ching and by the Imagism of Ezra Pound.  Consider, for example, the image of The Well

as discussed here on All Saints' Day 2003 and in the previous entry.

As background, consider the following remarks of James Hillman in "Egalitarian Typologies Versus the Perception of the Unique," Part  III: Persons as Images
 

"To conceive images as static is to forget that they are numens that move.  Charles Olson, a later poet in this tradition, said:  'One perception must immediately and directly lead to a further perception… always, always one perception must must must move instanter, on another.' 80  Remember Lavater and his insistence on instantaneity for reading the facial image.  This is a kind of movement that is not narrational, and the Imagists had no place for narrative.  'Indeed the great poems to come after the Imagist period– Eliot’s The Waste Land and Four Quartets; Pound’s Cantos; Williams’s Paterson– contain no defining narrative.' 81  The kind of movement Olson urges is an inward deepening of the image, an in-sighting of the superimposed levels of significance within it. 82  This is the very mode that Jung suggested for grasping dreams– not as a sequence in time, but as revolving around a nodal complex.  If dreams, then why not the dreamers.  We too are not only a sequence in time, a process of individuation. We are also each an image of individuality."

80  The New American Poetry (D. M. Allen, ed.) N.Y.: Evergreen, Grove, 1960, pp. 387-88. from Jones, p. 42.

81  Jones,* p. 40.

82  H. D. later turned narration itself into image by writing a novel in which the stories were "compounded like faces seen one on top of another," or as she says "superimposed on one another like a stack of photographic negatives" (Jones, p. 42).  Cf. Berry,** p. 63: "An image is simultaneous. No part precedes or causes another part, although all parts are involved with each other… We might imagine the dream as a series of superimpositions, each event adding texture and thickening to the rest."

    * Imagist Poetry (Peter Jones, ed.) London: Penguin, 1972

    ** The contrast between image simultaneity and narrative succession, and the different psychological effects of the two modes, is developed by Patricia Berry, "An Approach to the Dream," Spring 1974 (N. Y./Zürich: Spring Publ.), pp. 63, 68-71

Hillman also says that

"Jung’s 'complex' and Pound's definition of Image and Lavater's 'whole heap of images, thoughts, sensations, all at once' are all remarkably similar.  Pound calls an Image, 'that which presents an intellectual and emotional complex in an instant of time'… 'the Image is more than an Idea.  It is a vortex or cluster of fused ideas and is endowed with energy'… 'a Vortex, from which and through which, and into which, ideas are constantly rushing.' 79 Thus the movement, the dynamics, are within the complex and not only between complexes, as tensions of opposites told about in narrational sequences, stories that require arbitrary syntactical connectives which are unnecessary for reading an image where all is given at once."

79  These definitions of Image by Pound come from his various writings and can all be found in Jones, pp. 32-41.  Further on complex and image, see J. B. Harmer, Victory in Limbo: Imagism 1908-17, London: Secker & Warburg, 1975, pp. 164-68.

These remarks may help the reader to identify with Ada during her well-viewing in Cold Mountain (previous entry):

"She was dazzled by light and shade, by the confusing duplication of reflections and of frames. All coming from too many directions for the mind to take account of. The various images bounced against each other until she felt a desperate vertigo…."

If such complexity can be suggested by Hexagram 48, The Well, alone, consider the effect of the "cluster of fused ideas… endowed with energy" that is the entire 64-hexagram I Ching.

Related material:St. Augustine's Day 2006

Tuesday, April 6, 2004

Tuesday April 6, 2004

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:45 AM

Ideas and Art, Part II

"We do not, of course, see  ideas."

— Roger Kimball, Minimalist Fantasies, 2003

"Idea (Lat. idea , forma , species ; Gk. idea , eidos , from idein , to see; Fr. idée ; Ger. Bild ; Begriff )

Probably to no other philosophical term have there been attached so many different shades of meaning as to the word idea. Yet what this word signifies is of much importance. Its sense in the minds of some philosophers is the key to their entire system. But from Descartes onwards usage has become confused and inconstant. Locke, in particular, ruined the term altogether in English philosophical literature…."

The Catholic Encylopedia, 1910  

James Hillman, A Blue Fire , p. 53:

"For us ideas are ways of regarding things (modi res considerandi ), perspectives.  Ideas give us eyes, let us see …. Ideas are ways of seeing and knowing….

Our word idea  comes from the Greek eidos , which meant originally in early Greek thought, and as Plato used it, both that which one sees — an appearance or shape in a concrete sense — and that by means of which one sees.  We see them, and by means of them.  Ideas are both the shape of events, their constellation in this or that archetypal pattern, and the modes that make possible our ability to see through events into their pattern.  By means of an idea we can see the idea cloaked in the passing parade.  The implicit connection between having ideas to see with  and seeing ideas themselves suggests that the more ideas we have, the more we see, and the deeper the ideas we have, the deeper we see.  It also suggests that ideas engender other ideas, breeding new perspectives for viewing ourselves and world.

Moreover, without them we cannot 'see' even what we sense with the eyes in our heads, for our perceptions are shaped according to particular ideas …. And our ideas change as changes take place in the soul, for as Plato said, soul and idea refer to each other, in that an idea is the 'eye of the soul,' opening us through its insight and vision."

Hillman does not say where in Plato this extraordinary saying, that an idea is the eye of the soul, occurs.  He is probably wrong.

Both Kimball and Hillman seem confused.

A more sensible approach to these matters is available in Brian Cronin's Foundations of Philosophy:

"3.4 An Insight Pivots between the Abstract and the Concrete

On the one hand, an insight is dealing with data and images which are concrete and particular: Archimedes had one chalice, one King, and one particular problem to solve. On the other hand, what the insight grasps is an idea, a relation, a universal, a law; and that is abstract. The laws that Archimedes eventually formulated were universal, referring not only to this chalice but also to any other material body immersed in any other liquid at any time or any place. The insight is constituted precisely by 'seeing' the idea in the image, the intelligible in the sensible, the universal in the particular, the abstract in the concrete. We pivot back and forth between images and ideas as we search for the correct insight. First let us now clarify the difference between images, ideas and concepts…."

— From Ch. 2, Identifying Direct Insights

Saturday, November 1, 2003

Saturday November 1, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:48 AM

All Saints' Day:
The Song of Saint Ezra

Ezra Pound, imagist poet and fascist saint, died on this date in 1972.

 "But you, newest song of the lot,
  You are not old enough
     to have done much mischief.
  I
will get you a green coat out of China
  W
ith dragons worked upon it."

— "Further Instructions," 1913

For more on China and Christian Fascism, see the memorial to the wife of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek in TIME magazine, issue dated Nov. 3, 2003.

From Image in Poetry:

"Ezra Pound made perhaps the most widely used definition of image in the 20th century:

An ‘Image’ is that which presents an intellectual and emotional complex in an instant of time. "

— Ezra Pound, "A Few Don’ts by an Imagiste," Poetry, March 1913

For an excellent essay by Jungian James Hillman on the political implications of imagism, see

Egalitarian Typologies versus
the Perception of the Unique
.

A specific image that is a personal favorite of mine is found in the I Ching:

Note that in the West,
this Chinese character
is known as the "Pound sign."

"The Perception of the Unique," indeed.
 

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