Log24

Friday, July 26, 2019

Well, She Was Just Seventeen

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:46 AM

See also Just Intonation.

Friday, July 15, 2011

Crossing the Bridge

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:59 PM

King Arthur and the Deathly Hallows

BLACK KNIGHT: None shall pass.

ARTHUR: What?

BLACK KNIGHT: None shall pass.

ARTHUR: I have no quarrel with you, good Sir Knight,
                but I must cross this bridge.

BLACK KNIGHT: Then you shall die.

ARTHUR: I command you as King of the Britons
                to stand aside!

BLACK KNIGHT: I move for no man.

ARTHUR: So be it!

— Monty Python

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110715-Bushell-BlackKnight1954-Sm.jpg

Above: Anthony Bushell as King Arthur in 1954.
Bushell died on April 2, 1997 (4/2/97).
"Well, she was just seventeen…."

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110715-NYlotteryEvening.jpg

Thursday, January 17, 2008

Thursday January 17, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:24 PM
Well, she was
   just seventeen
 
(continued)

"Mazur introduced the topic of prime numbers with a story from Don Quixote in which Quixote asked a poet to write a poem with 17 lines. Because 17 is prime, the poet couldn't find a length for the poem's stanzas and was thus stymied."

— Undated American Mathematical Society news item about a Nov. 1, 2007, event

Related material:

Desconvencida,
Jueves, Enero 17, 2008

Horses of a Dream
(Log24, Sept. 12, 2003)

Knight Moves
(Log24 yesterday–
anniversary of the
Jan. 16 publication
of Don Quixote)

Windmill and Diamond
(St. Cecilia's Day 2006)

Thursday, December 13, 2007

Thursday December 13, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:09 AM
Prime Suspect

Well, she was
   just seventeen

“Mazur introduced the topic of prime numbers with a story from Don Quixote in which Quixote asked a poet to write a poem with 17 lines. Because 17 is prime, the poet couldn’t find a length for the poem’s stanzas and was thus stymied.”

— Undated American Mathematical Society news item about a Nov. 1, 2007, event

You know
   what I mean…

The goddess Durga

Durga


“… a spectacular seventh-century figure of the Hindu goddess Durga, whose hip-slung pose and     voluptuous torso, as plush and taut as ripe fruit, combine the naturalism and idealism of the very finest Indian work.” —The New York Times

“The Wu Li Masters know that physicists are doing more than ‘discovering the endless diversity of nature.’ They are dancing with Kali [or Durga], the Divine Mother of Hindu mythology.” –Gary Zukav, Harvard ’64

Yuletide Veronica 

Veronica

Or do you?

“I think transformation becomes the main word in my life, transformation.

Because you don’t want to just put a mirror in front of people and say, here, look at yourself. What do you see?

You want to have a skewed mirror. You want a mirror that says, you didn’t know you could see the back of your head. You didn’t know that you could… almost cubistic, see all aspects at the same time.

And what that does for human beings is it allows them to step out of their lives and to revisit it and maybe find something different about it.” —Julie Taymor

Related material:

The previous two entries and
readings for the Feast of
the Triumph of the Cross
in 2006 and in 2003.

Saturday, July 22, 2006

Saturday July 22, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 PM
Today’s Saint as
The Dark Lady:

Mary Magdalene
(Portrait by Nikos Kazantzakis
and Martin Scorsese):

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060722-Hershey1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

“Magdalene lay on her back, stark naked, drenched in sweat, her raven-black hair spread out over the pillow and her arms entwined beneath her head.  Her face was turned toward the wall and she was yawning.  Wrestling with men on this bed since dawn had tired her out.”

— Nikos Kazantzakis,
   The Last Temptation of Christ

Related material:

Time and Chance

   (See yesterday’s entry.) 

Time:
NY lottery mid-day today:
606
(See morning of 6/6.)

Chance:
NY lottery this evening:
017
(See Art Wars: Just Seventeen.)

Sunday, January 18, 2004

Sunday January 18, 2004

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:12 AM

A Living Church

"Plato has told you a truth; but Plato is dead. Shakespeare has startled you with an image; but Shakespeare will not startle you with any more. But imagine what it would be to live with such men still living. To know that Plato might break out with an original lecture to-morrow, or that at any moment Shakespeare might shatter everything with a single song. The man who lives in contact with what he believes to be a living Church is a man always expecting to meet Plato and Shakespeare to-morrow at breakfast. He is always expecting to see some truth that he has never seen before."

— G. K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy

C. P. Snow on G. H. Hardy in the foreword to A Mathematician's Apology:

"… he had another favourite entertainment.  'Mark that man we met last night,' he said, and someone had to be marked out of 100 in each of the categories Hardy had long since invented and defined.  STARK, BLEAK ('a stark man is not necessarily bleak: but all bleak men without exception want to be considered stark')…."

S. H. Cullinane on religion and Hollywood:

"If the incomparable Max Bialystock were to remake 'Up Close and Personal,' he might retitle it 'Distant and Impersonal.'  A Google search on this phrase suggests

a plot outline for Mel Brooks & Co."

In memory of
producer Ray Stark,
an excerpt from that plot outline:

The Oxford University Press summary of

God:
Myths of the Male Divine,
by David Leeming and Jake Page

"They [Leeming and Page] describe the rise of a male sky God as 'the equal to, the true mate, of Goddess, who was still associated with Earth.' In the Iron Age, the sky God became more aggressive, separating from the Goddess and taking his place as the King God, as Zeus, Odin, and Horus. Ultimately he emerged as the creator, a more distant and impersonal force. Here Leeming and Page also illuminate an important trend–a sense that the divine is beyond gender, that it permeates all things (as seen in the Chinese Tao and En Sof of the Kabbalah). They see a movement in the biography of God toward a reunion with the Goddess."

As for the Goddess, see

Art Wars: Just Seventeen

(December 17, 2002). 

Stark, a saint among Hollywood producers, died yesterday, January 17.  If, as Chesterton might surmise, he then met Plato and Shakespeare in Heaven, the former might discuss with him the eternal Platonic form of the number 17, while the latter might offer the following links on Stark's new heavenly laptop:

Cartoon Graveyard and

Art Wars: At the Still Point

This concludes the tribute to Stark.  For a tribute to Bleak, click here.

Wednesday, December 18, 2002

Wednesday December 18, 2002

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 AM

For the Dark Lady

On this midnight in the garden of good and evil, our new site music is “Nica’s Dream.”

From a website on composer Horace Silver:

“Horace Silver apparently composed Nica’s Dream (1956) for Baroness Pannonica de Koenigswarter-Rothschild, an English aristocrat and a very dear friend of his. She was known to the New York press as the Jazz Baroness and to the black musicians for whom she was something of a patron, simply as Nica. Her apartment in the fashionable Hotel Stanhope on Fifth Avenue became a ‘hospitality suite for some of the greatest jazz players of the day, whom she treated generously.’ (Jack Chambers, Milestones: The Music and Times of Miles Davis, University of Toronto Press, 1985, 1:248)

This music is not unrelated to the work of Thomas Pynchon.  From an essay by Charles Hollander:  

“There are some notable parallels between Nica and the woman Stencil knows as V., who started her career with ‘…a young crude Mata Hari act.’ (V.; 386)….  Not that V. is Nica in any roman a clef sense: she is not. But the resonances are powerful at the level of the subtext. Nica is a Rothschild whose life reflects the issues Pynchon wants us to attend in V.: disinheritance, old dynasty vs. new dynasty, secret agents and couriers, plots and counter-plots, ‘The Big One, the century’s master cabal,’ and ‘the ultimate Plot Which Has No Name’ (V.; 226)….” 

See also my journal entry for the December 16-17 midnight, “Just Seventeen.”

Tuesday, December 17, 2002

Tuesday December 17, 2002

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 AM

ART WARS:


Just Seventeen

Durga

Today's site music*
is in honor of
a memorable date.

1963
Northern Songs.
Quiet may be restored by using
the midi control box at the top right
of this page.  Please let me know
if your browser is not showing
this control box.

 

Veronica  

From a June/July 1997
Hadassah Magazine article:

"Plato is obviously Jewish."

— Rebecca Goldstein

Readings on the Dark Lady  

From a July 27, 1997
New York Times article
by Holland Cotter:

"The single most important and sustained model for Khmer culture was India, from which Cambodia inherited two religions, Buddhism and Hinduism, and an immensely sophisticated art. This influence announces itself early in this exhibition in a spectacular seventh-century figure of the Hindu goddess Durga, whose hip-slung pose and voluptuous torso, as plush and taut as ripe fruit, combine the naturalism and idealism of the very finest Indian work."

From The Dancing Wu Li Masters,
by Gary Zukav, Harvard '64:

"The Wu Li Masters know that physicists are doing more than 'discovering the endless diversity of nature.' They are dancing with Kali [or Durga], the Divine Mother of Hindu mythology."

"Eastern religions have nothing to say about physics, but they have a great deal to say about human experience. In Hindu mythology, Kali, the Divine Mother, is the symbol for the infinite diversity of experience. Kali represents the entire physical plane. She is the drama, tragedy, humor, and sorrow of life. She is the brother, father, sister, mother, lover, and friend. She is the fiend, monster, beast, and brute. She is the sun and the ocean. She is the grass and the dew. She is our sense of accomplishment and our sense of doing worthwhile. Our thrill of discovery is a pendant on her bracelet. Our gratification is a spot of color on her cheek. Our sense of importance is the bell on her toe.

This full and seductive, terrible and wonderful earth mother always has something to offer. Hindus know the impossibility of seducing her or conquering her and the futility of loving her or hating her; so they do the only thing that they can do. They simply honor her."

How could I dance with another….?

— John Lennon and Paul McCartney, 1962-1963  

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