Log24

Thursday, February 20, 2014

Relativity Blues

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM

(Continued

A review of this date in 2005 —

Modal Theology

"We symbolize logical necessity
with the box (box.gif (75 bytes))
and logical possibility
with the diamond (diamond.gif (82 bytes))."

— Keith Allen Korcz

And what do we  
   symbolize by   The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/Modal-diamondbox.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors. ?

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Relativity Blues

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:21 PM

(Continued from the day of Hunter S. Thompson's suicide)

See "The First Church of Marilynne Robinson."

(The New Yorker , May 30, 2012)

Sunday, August 21, 2011

Relativistic Truth

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:25 PM

Today's online New York Times on the conclusion of the Roman Catholic Church's "World Youth" week—

"At the end of Sunday’s Mass, the pope announced that the next such event would be in Rio de Janeiro in 2013. Until then, he told those at the service, in Portuguese, that they 'will be swimming against the tide in a society with a relativistic culture, which wishes neither to seek nor hold on to the truth.'*"

* Fact check— This agrees with the Vatican Radio version.

Related material: Relativity Blues and Portal to 1937

IMAGE- Hotel Bella Vista as 'Portal del Aguila de Oro'

The "Portal" link above is in honor of the May 2 dies natalis of Salomon Bochner (pdf).
For some background, see yesterday's Castles in the Air and Bochner in this journal.

Sunday, November 15, 2009

The Dead Shepherd and…

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:48 AM

Chinese Boxes

Continued from “The  Dead Shepherd,” Jan. 24, 2007

Yesterday’s Washington Post:

“James R. Lilley, 81, a longtime CIA operative in Asia who served as ambassador to China during the Tiananmen Square crackdown… died Nov. 12.”

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09A/091115-JamesRLilley.jpg

James R. Lilley

From a page linked to here on the date of Lilley’s death:

“… the extraordinary set of nested Chinese boxes that we introduced earlier in this series….”

A seemingly unrelated item in today’s New York Times obituaries index:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09A/091115-Pnueli.jpg

This suggests an article on temporal logic at IBM Developer Works, which contains a link to Time-Rover.com.

This in turn leads to…

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09A/091115-ManTakShing.jpg

Man-Tak Shing

Shing’s CV at the Naval Postgraduate School affirms the usefulness of temporal logic.

Those who prefer metaphysics may consult the novel Many Dimensions referred to in yesterday’s entries and in “Relativity Blues” (Feb. 20, 2005)–

From Many Dimensions:

“Lord Arglay had a suspicion that the Stone would be purely logical.  Yes, he thought, but what, in that sense, were the rules of its pure logic?”

Good question.

Saturday, December 31, 2005

Saturday December 31, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:20 PM
The Last Word
 
From an
album cover:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051231-Blues2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

From Feb. 20:

Relativity Blues
and
Hunter Thompson
Commits Suicide

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051231-HST.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051231-Shining.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Stephen King

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051231-Mahalo.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Hunter S. Thompson

Sunday, February 20, 2005

Sunday February 20, 2005

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:20 PM

Relativity Blues

Today, February 20, is the 19th anniversary of my note The Relativity Problem in Finite Geometry.  Here is some related material.

In 1931, the Christian writer Charles Williams grappled with the theology of time, space, free will, and the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics (anticipating by many years the discussion of this topic by physicists beginning in the 1950's).

(Some pure mathematics — untainted by physics or theology — that is nevertheless related, if only by poetic analogy, to Williams's 1931 novel, Many Dimensions, is discussed in the above-mentioned note and in a generalization, Solomon's Cube.)

On the back cover of Williams's 1931 novel, the current publisher, William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company of Grand Rapids, Michigan, makes the following statement:

"Replete with rich religious imagery, Many Dimensions explores the relation between predestination and free will as it depicts different human responses to redemptive transcendence."

One possible response to such statements was recently provided in some detail by a Princeton philosophy professor.  See On Bullshit, by Harry G. Frankfurt, Princeton University Press, 2005.

A more thoughtful response would take into account the following:

1. The arguments presented in favor of philosopher John Calvin, who discussed predestination, in The Death of Adam: Essays on Modern Thought, by Marilynne Robinson

2. The physics underlying Einstein's remarks on free will, God, and dice
 
3. The physics underlying Rebecca Goldstein's novel Properties of Light and Paul Preuss's novels  Secret Passages and Broken Symmetries

4. The physics underlying the recent so-called "free will theorem" of John Conway and Simon Kochen of Princeton University

5. The recent novel Gilead, by Marilynne Robinson, which deals not with philosophy, but with lives influenced by philosophy — indirectly, by the philosophy of the aforementioned John Calvin.

From a review of Gilead by Jane Vandenburgh:  

"In The Death of Adam, Robinson shows Jean Cauvin to be the foremost prophet of humanism whose Protestant teachings against the hierarchies of the Roman church set in motion the intellectual movements that promoted widespread literacy among the middle and lower classes, led to both the American and French revolutions, and not only freed African slaves in the United States but brought about suffrage for women. It's odd then that through our culture's reverse historicism, the term 'Calvinism' has come to mean 'moralistic repression.'"

For more on what the Calvinist publishing firm Eerdmans calls "redemptive transcendence," see various July 2003 Log24.net entries.  If these entries include a fair amount of what Princeton philosophers call bullshit, let the Princeton philosophers meditate on the summary of Harvard philosophy quoted here on November 5 of last year, as well as the remarks of November 5, 2003,  and those of November 5, 2002.

From Many Dimensions (Eerdmans paperback, 1963, page 53):

"Lord Arglay had a suspicion that the Stone would be purely logical.  Yes, he thought, but what, in that sense, were the rules of its pure logic?"

A recent answer:

Modal Theology

"We symbolize logical necessity
with the box (box.gif (75 bytes))
and logical possibility
with the diamond (diamond.gif (82 bytes))."

Keith Allen Korcz,
(Log24.net, 1/25/05)

And what do we           
   symbolize by  The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/Modal-diamondbox.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors. ?

"The possibilia that exist,
and out of which
the Universe arose,
are located in
     a necessary being…."

Michael Sudduth,
Notes on
God, Chance, and Necessity
by Keith Ward,
Regius Professor of Divinity
at Christ Church College, Oxford
(the home of Lewis Carroll)

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