Log24

Thursday, January 3, 2019

On St. Stephen’s Day 2018…

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:21 PM

Tuesday, December 26, 2017

Stoned: A Reading for St. Stephen’s Day

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:22 AM

See also Log24 posts now tagged Apperception.

Friday, May 19, 2017

In the Service of Narrative

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:40 PM

Quoted here on St. Stephen's Day, 2008

“Wayne C. Booth’s lifelong
 study of the art of rhetoric
 illuminated the means
 by which authors seduce,
 cajole and lie to their readers
 in the service of narrative.”

— New York Times, Oct. 11, 2005

Booth was a native of American Fork, Utah.

Sunday, July 5, 2015

Takeout

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:00 PM

A post suggested by today's news from
Calais, Maine (just across the St. Croix
river from St. Stephen in Canada) —

"You want Frye's with that?"

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Annals of Academic Prose

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:04 PM

See also St. Stephen's Day, 2012.

Saturday, October 19, 2013

Face, Voice, Table

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:29 PM

  Et ignotas animum dimittit in artes
— Ovid, Metamorphoses , VIII, 188,
     epigraph to Joyce's Portrait

Log24 last month —

Paul Hertz, alias "Ignotus the Mage" —

"When we're doing the fortunetelling, as soon
as we finish capturing the face and the voice,
they get sent right over to the table." — Paul Hertz,
"Ignotus" video, 2013

Commentary:

"… ignotus  has faint connotations of lowness,
baseness, vulgarity"

— "International Eyesore: Joyce the Pornographer,"
by S. J. Boyd, pp. 31-60 in Troubled Histories, 
Troubled Fictions
 
, ed. by C. C. Barfoot et al.

Or not so faint.

Related material:

The villanelle from A Portrait , and
a Log24 post of St. Stephen's Day, 2011.

Sunday, July 14, 2013

Pageant

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:18 AM

Last night's 9:29 PM (ET) post featured the phrase
"This way to the egress."

Last night's 10 PM post featured two deaths:

The author of  The Best Christmas Pageant Ever
reportedly died at 85 on Tuesday, July 9.

A former director of the Museum of Modern Art
who was famously shown the exit door there 
in his younger years reportedly died at 80 on
Saturday, July 6.

For a sort of pageant combining Christmas,
the Museum of Modern Art, and an egress,
see St. Stephen's Day, 2008.

Sunday, September 2, 2012

The Word in the Desert

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:09 AM

(Continued)

For Trotsky's Birthday (Old Style), 2009—

IMAGE- Two Log24 posts, on Rosalind Krauss and on the occult, from Oct. 25, 2009

Related material:

IMAGE- Video- On the road to the U2 Rose Bowl concert of Oct. 25, 2009- 'Quest for the U2 Joshua Tree + Zabriskie'

IMAGE- NY Times Sept. 1, 2012, online obituary for Alexander Saxton, who died by his own hand on Aug. 20, 2012

(Click for further details.)

See also St. Stephen's Day, 2011.

Saturday, November 12, 2011

Professor Dodge

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:30 PM

From today's previous post, a fragmentary thought—

"Professor Dodge and the underground artists
whose work he helped save are the subjects of a book…"

Jim Dodge, Stone Junction

(a novel first published in 1989)

From pages 206-208, Kindle Edition

`Have you seen it?'

Volta hesitated. `Well, I've dreamed  it.'

Daniel shook his head. `I'm getting lost. You want me to vanish into your dreams?'

`Good Lord, no,' Volta blanched. `That's exactly what I don't  want you to do.'

`So, what is it exactly you do  want me to do?'

`Steal the diamond.'

`So, it's a diamond?'

`Yes, though it's a bit like saying the ocean is water. The diamond is perfectly spherical,* perfectly clear— though it seems to glow— and it's about two-thirds the size of a bowling ball. I think of it as the Diamond. Capital D.'

`Who owns it?'

`No one. The United States government has it at the moment. We want it. And to be honest with you, Daniel, I particularly want it, want it dearly. I want to look at it, into it, hold it in my hands. I had a vision involving a spherical diamond, a vision that changed my life, and I want to confirm that it was a vision of something real, the spirit embodied, the circuit complete.'

Daniel was smiling. `You're going to love this. That dream I wanted to talk to you about, my first since the explosion? It just happened to feature a raven with a spherical diamond in its beak. Obviously, it wasn't as big as a bowling ball, and there was a thin spiral flame running edge to edge through its center, which made it seem more coldly brilliant than warmly glowing, but it sounds like the same basic diamond to me.'

`And what do you think it is?'

`I think it's beautiful.'

Volta gave him a thin smile. `If I were more perverse than I already lamentably am, I would say it is the Eye of the Beholder. In fact, I don't know what it is.'

`It might be a dream,' Daniel said.

`Very possibly,' Volta agreed, `but I don't think so. I think— feel , to be exact— that the Diamond is an interior force given exterior density, the transfigured metaphor of the prima materia , the primordial mass, the Spiritus Mundi . I'm assuming you're familiar with the widely held supposition that the entire universe was created from a tiny ball of dense matter which exploded, sending pieces hurtling into space, expanding from the center. The spherical diamond is the memory, the echo, the ghost of that generative cataclysm; the emblematic point of origin. Or if, as some astrophysicists believe, the universe will reach some entropic point in its expansion and begin to collapse back into itself, in that case the Diamond may be a homing point, the seed crystal, to which it will all come hurtling back together— and perhaps through itself, into another dimension entirely. Or it might be the literal Philosopher's Stone we alchemists speak of so fondly. Or I might be completely wrong. That's why I want to see it. If I could actually stand in its presence, I'm convinced I'd know what it is. I would even venture to say, at the risk of rabid projection, that it wants  to be seen and known.'

`But you're not even sure it exists,' Daniel said. `Right? And hey, it's tough to steal something that doesn't  exist, even if you can be invisible. The more I think about this the less sense it makes.'

* Here Dodge's mystical vision seems akin to that of Anthony Judge in "Embodying the Sphere of Change" (St. Stephen's Day, 2001). Actually, the cube, not the sphere, is the best embodiment of Judge's vision.

See also Tuesday's "Stoned" and the 47 references
to the term "bowling" in the Kindle Stone Junction .

Furthermore… Live from New York, it's Saturday Night!

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Marginal Remarks

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:17 AM

Today's Google Doodle is in honor of Fermat's birthday—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110817-GoogleFermatDoodle.jpg

"I have discovered a truly marvelous proof of this theorem,
 which this doodle is too small to contain."
— Google's caption

Another marginal remark, from a link target in last night's "Ein Kampf"—

"We are talking about the spatial and temporal phenomenon of language,
not about some non-spatial, non-temporal chimera [Note in margin:
Only it is possible to be interested in a phenomenon in a variety of ways]."

— Ludwig Wittgenstein, Philosophical Investigations  (1953),  Section 108

Related material on spatial and temporal phenomena—

A Dec. 29, 2010, comment to a Dec. 26 weblog post on
"Unexpected Connections in Mathematics"—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110817-FourColor.jpg

Connoisseurs of synchronicities  in the phenomena of language may note that
these December dates mark the feasts of St. Stephen and St. Thomas Becket.

From the feast of the latter, two Log24 posts: Toy Stories and True Grid.

Those less enchanted by pop math than Google may prefer to observe
two other birthdays today— those of Robert De Niro and of Sean Penn:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110817-NoAngels.jpg

Sunday, January 16, 2011

The Mind Spider*

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:29 PM

On a conference at the New School for Social Research on Friday and Saturday, December 3rd and 4th, 2010—

"This conference is part of the early stages in the formation of a lexicon of political concepts. It will be the 5th in a series of conferences started in Tel Aviv University. The project is guided by one formal principle: we pose the Socratic question "what is x?", and by one theatrical principle: the concepts defined should be relevant to political thought…."

[The conference is not unrelated to the New York Times  philosophy series "The Stone." Connoisseurs of coincidence— or, as Pynchon would have it, "chums of chance"— may read the conclusion of this series, titled "Stoned," in the light of the death on December 26th (St. Stephen's Day) of Matthew Lipman, creator of the "philosophy for children" movement. Many New York Times  readers will, of course, be ignorant of the death by stoning of St. Stephen

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110116-BeloitStoningSm.jpg

   Beloit College Nuremberg Chronicle

commemorated on December 26th. They should study Acts of the ApostlesChapter  6 and Chapter 7.]

Meanwhile, in this  journal—

Click to enlarge

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110116-ManhattanStarWarsSm.jpg

For some background on the Dec. 4th link to "Damnation Morning," see "Why Me?"

For some political background, see "Bright Star"+"Dark Lady" in this journal.

* The title refers to a story by Fritz Leiber.

Saturday, May 22, 2010

In the Details

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:31 AM

Today's New York Times

Byzantine

"…there were fresh questions about whether the intelligence overhaul that created the post of national intelligence director was fatally flawed, and whether Mr. Obama would move gradually to further weaken the authorities granted to the director and give additional power to individual spy agencies like the Central Intelligence Agency. Mr. Blair and each of his predecessors have lamented openly that the intelligence director does not have enough power to deliver the intended shock therapy to America’s byzantine spying apparatus."

Catch-22 in Doonesbury today—

Image-- Chaplain and doctor in Doonesbury

From Log24 on Jan. 5, 2010—
   Artifice of Eternity

A Medal

In memory of Byzantine scholar Ihor Sevcenko,
who died at 87 on St. Stephen's Day, 2009–

Image-- Cross-in-circle design based on figure in Weyl's 'Symmetry'

Thie above image results from a Byzantine
meditation based on a detail in the previous post

Image-- 'Lyche Gate' with asterisk, from Google Books, digitized April 24, 2008

 

Image-- The Case of the Lyche Gate Asterisk

"This might be a good time to
call it a day." –Today's Doonesbury

"TOMORROW ALWAYS BELONGS TO US"
Title of an exhibition by young Nordic artists
in Sweden during the summer of 2008.

The exhibition included, notably, Josefine Lyche.

Tuesday, January 5, 2010

Artifice of Eternity

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:59 AM

A Medal

In memory of Byzantine scholar Ihor Sevcenko,
who died at 87 on St. Stephen's Day, 2009–

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060915-Roots.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

William Grimes on Sevcenko in this morning's New York Times:

"Perhaps his most fascinating, if uncharacteristic, literary contribution came shortly after World War II, when he worked with Ukrainians stranded in camps in Germany for displaced persons.

In April 1946 he sent a letter to Orwell, asking his permission to translate 'Animal Farm' into Ukrainian for distribution in the camps. The idea instantly appealed to Orwell, who not only refused to accept any royalties but later agreed to write a preface for the edition. It remains his most detailed, searching discussion of the book."

See also a rather different medal discussed
here in the context of an Orwellian headline from
The New York Times on Christmas morning,
the day before Sevcenko died.
That headline, at the top of the online front page,
was "Arthur Koestler, Man of Darkness."

Leibniz, design for medallion showing binary numbers as an 'imago creationis'

The medal, offered as an example of brightness
to counteract the darkness of the Times, was designed
by Leibniz in honor of his discovery of binary arithmetic.
See Brightness at Noon and Brightness continued.

"By groping toward the light we are made to realize
how deep the darkness is around us."
— Arthur Koestler, The Call Girls: A Tragi-Comedy,
Random House, 1973, page 118

Friday, July 6, 2007

Friday July 6, 2007

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:07 PM
Another Mearingstone
(see last 3 entries)–

11:07:02 PM:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050310-hex.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Sex and Art
in a
Chinese Poem

See also the entries
of St. Stephen’s Day
(Boxing Day), 2006
.

Sunday, December 31, 2006

Sunday December 31, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 PM
Tools of
Christ Church
(Continued from
St. Thomas Becket’s day)

The author of the thesis
“Conversations with the Dead”

described in this morning’s entry,

Aesthetics of Evil
vs. Christ Church
,

is Darren Joseph Danylyshen.

 
This may be the same
Darren Danylyshen who has
taught at St. Stephen’s SS
(a Catholic secondary school
in Bowmanville, Ontario).
 
Following a link in the
section of that school’s site
beneath the title
St. Stephen’s Goes Hollywood,”
we find the following:
 
The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06B/061231-McLuhan.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
 
This ties in rather neatly with the
“Tools of Christ Church” entry
for last Friday–
St. Thomas Becket’s day–
and with the fact that
today would be the feast day
of Marshall McLuhan,
if McLuhan were a saint.
(McLuhan, a Catholic, died on
Dec. 31, 1980.)
 
Related material:
 
The Communion of Saints as
the Association of Ideas
 

Tuesday, December 27, 2005

Tuesday December 27, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:11 PM
Dance of the Numbers
(continued)

The Pennsylvania lottery 
on St. Stephen's Day–

Midday: 105
Evening: 064

From a new
branch of theology, 
lottery hermeneutics:

See Log24, 1/05,
Death and the Spirit,

and the 64 hexagrams of
the box-style I Ching.

From the Wikipedia
article on hermeneutics:

"One prominent theme which arises in contemporary philosophical hermeneutics (i.e., the work of Hans-Georg Gadamer) is a serious calling into question of scientism. Scientism is the more or less unquestioned belief in the supremacy of the natural sciences when it comes to serving as models of knowledge. By calling scientism into question, hermeneutics is arguing for the legitimacy of (among other things) aesthetic, literary, spiritual, and philosophical knowledge, alongside (but not instead of) scientific knowledge."

Monday, December 26, 2005

Monday December 26, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:00 PM

Wren Day

St. Stephen’s Day [Dec. 26] is a national holiday in Ireland, but the celebrations have little connection to the Saint.”

This day in Ireland is instead devoted to a barbaric ritual, “the hunting of the wren.”

Let us therefore recall a more civilized figure– St. Christopher Wren— whose feast day is Feb. 25.

From Log24 on that date in 2005:

… Only by the form,
    the pattern,
Can words or music reach
The stillness, as
    a Chinese jar still
Moves perpetually in its stillness.
Not the stillness of the violin,
    while the note lasts,
Not that only, but
    the co-existence,
Or say that the end
    precedes the beginning,
And the end
    and the beginning
    were always there
Before the beginning
    and after the end.
And all is always now.

T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets

Friday, April 15, 2005

Friday April 15, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:11 AM
Leonardo Day

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050415-Google.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

In memory of Leonardo and of Chen Yifei (previous entry), a link to the Sino-Judaic Institute’s review of Chen’s film “Escape to Shanghai” —

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050415-PointsEast.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Click on the above for details.

Related material
from Log24.net:


Saturday, December 27, 2003  10:21 PM

Toy

“If little else, the brain is an educational toy.  While it may be a frustrating plaything — one whose finer points recede just when you think you are mastering them — it is nonetheless perpetually fascinating, frequently surprising, occasionally rewarding, and it comes already assembled; you don’t have to put it together on Christmas morning.

The problem with possessing such an engaging toy is that other people want to play with it, too.  Sometimes they’d rather play with yours than theirs.  Or they object if you play with yours in a different manner from the way they play with theirs.  The result is, a few games out of a toy department of possibilities are universally and endlessly repeated.  If you don’t play some people’s game, they say that you have ‘lost your marbles,’ not recognizing that,

while Chinese checkers is indeed a fine pastime, a person may also play dominoes, chess, strip poker, tiddlywinks, drop-the-soap or Russian roulette with his brain.

One brain game that is widely, if poorly, played is a gimmick called ‘rational thought.’ “

— Tom Robbins, Even Cowgirls Get the Blues

Sol LeWitt
June 12, 1969
:

“I took the number twenty-four and there’s twenty-four ways of expressing the numbers one, two, three, four.  And I assigned one kind of line to one, one to two, one to three, and one to four.  One was a vertical line, two was a horizontal line, three was diagonal left to right, and four was diagonal right to left.  These are the basic kind of directions that lines can take…. the absolute ways that lines can be drawn.   And I drew these things as parallel lines very close to one another in boxes.  And then there was a system of changing them so that within twenty-four pages there were different arrangements of actually sixteen squares, four sets of four.  Everything was based on four.  So this was kind of a… more of a… less of a rational… I mean, it gets into the whole idea of methodology.”

Yes, it does.
See Art Wars, Poetry’s Bones, and Time Fold.


Friday, December 26, 2003  7:59 PM

ART WARS, St. Stephen’s Day:

The Magdalene Code

Got The Da Vinci Code for Xmas.

From page 262:

When Langdon had first seen The Little Mermaid, he had actually gasped aloud when he noticed that the painting in Ariel’s underwater home was none other than seventeenth-century artist Georges de la Tour’s The Penitent Magdalene — a famous homage to the banished Mary Magdalene — fitting decor considering the movie turned out to be a ninety-minute collage of blatant symbolic references to the lost sanctity of Isis, Eve, Pisces the fish goddess, and, repeatedly, Mary Magdalene.

Related Log24 material —

December 21, 2002:

A Maiden’s Prayer

The Da Vinci Code, pages 445-446:

“The blade and chalice?” Marie asked.  “What exactly do they look like?”

Langdon sensed she was toying with him, but he played along, quickly describing the symbols.

A look of vague recollection crossed her face.  “Ah, yes, of course.  The blade represents all that is masculine.  I believe it is drawn like this, no?”  Using her index finger, she traced a shape on her palm.

“Yes,” Langdon said.  Marie had drawn the less common “closed” form of the blade, although Langdon had seen the symbol portrayed both ways.

“And the inverse,” she said, drawing again upon her palm, “is the chalice, which represents the feminine.”

“Correct,” Langdon said….

… Marie turned on the lights and pointed….

“There you are, Mr. Langdon.  The blade and chalice.”….

“But that’s the Star of Dav–“

Langdon stopped short, mute with amazement as it dawned on him.

The blade and chalice.

Fused as one.

The Star of David… the perfect union of male and female… Solomon’s Seal… marking the Holy of Holies, where the male and female deities — Yahweh and Shekinah — were thought to dwell.

Related Log24 material —

May 25, 2003:
Star Wars.
 


Concluding remark of April 15, 2005:
For a more serious approach to portraits of
redheads, see Chen Yifei’s work.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050415-TheDuet-ChenYifei.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Friday, December 26, 2003

Friday December 26, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:59 PM

ART WARS, St. Stephen’s Day:

The Magdalene Code

Got The Da Vinci Code for Xmas.

From page 262:

When Langdon had first seen The Little Mermaid, he had actually gasped aloud when he noticed that the painting in Ariel’s underwater home was none other than seventeenth-century artist Georges de la Tour’s The Penitent Magdalene — a famous homage to the banished Mary Magdalene — fitting decor considering the movie turned out to be a ninety-minute collage of blatant symbolic references to the lost sanctity of Isis, Eve, Pisces the fish goddess, and, repeatedly, Mary Magdalene.

Related Log24 material —

December 21, 2002:

A Maiden’s Prayer

The Da Vinci Code, pages 445-446:

“The blade and chalice?” Marie asked.  “What exactly do they look like?”

Langdon sensed she was toying with him, but he played along, quickly describing the symbols.

A look of vague recollection crossed her face.  “Ah, yes, of course.  The blade represents all that is masculine.  I believe it is drawn like this, no?”  Using her index finger, she traced a shape on her palm.

“Yes,” Langdon said.  Marie had drawn the less common “closed” form of the blade, although Langdon had seen the symbol portrayed both ways.

“And the inverse,” she said, drawing again upon her palm, “is the chalice, which represents the feminine.”

“Correct,” Langdon said….

… Marie turned on the lights and pointed….

“There you are, Mr. Langdon.  The blade and chalice.”….

“But that’s the Star of Dav–“

Langdon stopped short, mute with amazement as it dawned on him.

The blade and chalice.

Fused as one.

The Star of David… the perfect union of male and female… Solomon’s Seal… marking the Holy of Holies, where the male and female deities — Yahweh and Shekinah — were thought to dwell.

Related Log24 material —

May 25, 2003:
Star Wars
.

Saturday, April 19, 2003

Saturday April 19, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:56 PM

Claves Regni Caelorum

“June dawns, July noons, August evenings over, finished, done, and gone forever with only the sense of it all left here in his head. Now, a whole autumn, a white winter, a cool and greening spring to figure sums and totals of summer past. And if he should forget, the dandelion wine stood in the cellar, numbered huge for each and every day. He would go there often, stare straight into the sun until he could stare no more, then close his eyes and consider the burned spots, the fleeting scars left dancing on his warm eyelids; arranging, rearranging each fire and reflection until the pattern was clear.”
— Ray Bradbury, Dandelion Wine

“Socialism or Death”
— Banner in the film “Guantanamera” (Cuba, 1994)

“I’m thinking, I’m thinking!”
Jack Benny, replying to bandits who demanded his money or his life.  Benny was born on St. Valentine’s day and died on St. Stephen’s day.

For what it’s worth, both Bradbury and Benny are from Waukegan, Illinois.

“Through the unknown, remembered gate….”
— T. S. Eliot, epigraph to
Parallelisms of Complete Designs, by

Peter J. Cameron

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