Log24

Thursday, December 1, 2011

Paranoia Strikes Deep

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:02 PM

Tens of Millions of Smartphones Come With Spyware
Preinstalled, Security Analyst Says

Published December 01, 2011 – FoxNews.com

For details, see comments at YouTube.

Related entertainment—

1. Tara Fitzgerald in "New World Disorder" (1999)—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111201-NewWorldDisorder-TaraFitzgerald.jpg

We skipped the light fandango
turned cartwheels 'cross the floor
I was feeling kinda seasick
but the crowd called out for more

2. Tara Fitzgerald in "Broken Glass" (2011)—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111201-TaraFitgerald-BrokenGlass.jpg

And so it was that later
as the miller told his tale
that her face, at first just ghostly,
turned a whiter shade of pale

Procul Harum song at beginning and end of "The Net" (1995)

“Lord Arglay had a suspicion that the Stone
would be purely logical.  Yes, he thought,
but what, in that sense, were the rules of its pure logic?”

Many Dimensions  (1931), by Charles Williams,
   quoted here on Kristallnacht 2011

See also, from "The Net"—

Decompiling Wolfenstein

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111201-DecompilingWolfenstein.jpg

"In Wolfenstein 3D , the player assumes the role of an American soldier
of Polish descent… attempting to escape from the Nazi stronghold of
Castle Wolfenstein." — Wikipedia

Monday, January 3, 2011

New Critical Art

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 PM

From a scholar quoted in this morning's post

"Both Vico and Joyce, each in his own way, practice what Vico calls a nuov'arte critica , a 'new critical art'…"

From Hugh Grant's birthday, 2003 (found in a search for whiteness  in this morning's post) —

Tara Fitzgerald and Hugh Grant
in "Sirens" (1994)

PATRICK’S RUNE

At Tara, in this fateful hour,
I place all heaven with its power.
And the sun with its brightness,
And the snow with its whiteness,
And the fire with all the strength it hath,
And the lightning with its rapid wrath,
And the winds with their swiftness along their path,
And the sea with its deepness,
And the rocks with their steepness,
And the earth with its starkness;
All these I place
By God’s almighty help and grace
Between myself and the powers of darkness.

From A Swiftly Tilting Planet
by Madeleine L’Engle

The cover of yesterday's Sunday New York Times Book Review
features stylized letters by artist Leonardo Sonnoli that include black
circles and triangles —

IMAGE- NY Times Book Review cover art by Leonardo Sonnoli

The stylized Sonnoli letters spell out "WORDS ABOUT WORDS ABOUT WORDS."
This phrase is used to introduce essays on criticism by "six accomplished critics."

A less accomplished critic might note that in the picture above, Tara is modeling
a new fashion by Sonnoli — namely, the word OOV.  A search for this word yields…

"OOV in text processing stands for 'out-of-vocabulary,' i.e., a word
 that is not known in the computer's online dictionary."

It should be.

Addendum (from a link in the same search for whiteness ) in memory of a great beauty who died on Sunday —
      http://www.log24.com/log10/saved/100613-WhiteBySchwartz.gif

Tuesday, September 9, 2003

Tuesday September 9, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:04 PM

Story Theory

The conflict between the Euclidean, or “diamond” theory of truth, and the Trudeau, or “story” theory of truth, continues.

On this, Hugh Grant’s birthday, let us recall last year’s log24 entry for this date. On Roger Ebert’s review of the Hugh Grant film “Sirens” about the artist Norman Lindsay:

Ebert gets Pan wrong in this film; he says, “the bearded Lindsay is a Pan of sorts.” No. The “Pan of sorts” is in fact the girl who romps joyfully with the local boys and who later, with great amusement, uses her divine x-ray vision to view Tara Fitzgerald naked in church.

This year’s offering for Grant’s birthday is an illustrated prayer by a great defender of the religious, or “story,” theory of truth, Madeleine L’Engle:

Tara Fitzgerald

PATRICK’S RUNE

At Tara, in this fateful hour,
I place all heaven with its power.
And the sun with its brightness,
And the snow with its whiteness,
And the fire with all the strength it hath,
And the lightning with its rapid wrath,
And the winds with their swiftness along their path,
And the sea with its deepness,
And the rocks with their steepness,
And the earth with its starkness;
All these I place
By God’s almighty help and grace
Between myself and the powers of darkness.

From A Swiftly Tilting Planet
by Madeleine L’Engle


For an uncensored view, see my Harvard weblog.

Monday, September 9, 2002

Monday September 9, 2002

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:33 PM

On this, his birthday, actor Hugh Grant
is hereby named an

Honorary Waco Wacko.

By the authority vested in me by the possession of

  1. Knowledge of Vivienne Browning’s My Browning Family Album, a work dedicated to Dr. Joseph Armstrong, “founder of the Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University, Waco, Texas,”
  2. Knowledge that today is the date of the Battle of Marathon, and of the claim that

    The spread of Pan’s worship beyond his home pastures of Arcadia was said to have arisen around the 5th Century BCE. Pan asked why the Athenians neglected him, and promised them victory over the Persians if they would worship him. At Marathon, the Persians were routed and fled in Panic; so, the Athenians built a temple for him on the Acropolis, and his worship soon extended to all Greece.”

    2a. (including subsidiary knowledge of the ridiculous falseness of all political statements, including the following contemptible lie by Michael Dukakis in his 1988 Democratic National Convention acceptance speech:

    “And as I accept your nomination tonight, I can’t help recalling that the first marathon was run in ancient Greece, and that on important occasions like this one, the citizens of Athens would complete their ceremonies by taking a pledge. That pledge, that covenant, is as eloquent and timely today as it was 2000 years ago.  

    ‘We will never bring disgrace to this, our country, by any act of dishonesty or cowardice. We will fight for the ideals of this, our country. We will revere and obey the laws. We will strive to quicken our sense of civic duty. Thus, in all these ways, we will transmit this country greater, better, stronger, prouder and more beautiful than it was transmitted to us.’ “)

    (None of the Harvard intellects associated with Dukakis saw fit to point out that there never was any such pledge. As a consequence, both Harvard University and the Democratic Party remain cursed to this day.),

  3. Knowledge (both intellectual and carnal) of the female form of the god Pan, as seen in the classic and great movie “Sirens” (starring, among others, Hugh Grant) and on the cover of the 1977 Olivia Newton-John album “Making a Good Thing Better,”

  4. Knowledge that even the best critics can be wrong, as exemplified by Roger Ebert’s remarks in his review of “Sirens”

    “Although they are often charged with being emotionally distant, the British have produced more than their share of sexual outlaws, from Oscar Wilde to Aleister Crowley to D.H. Lawrence to Francis Bacon, to balance the ledger. The central figure in ‘Sirens’ is perhaps vaguely inspired by another legendary British bohemian, Augustus John, an artist whose models and mistresses were interchangeable, and who delighted in scandal.

    Named Norman Lindsay, the film’s hero is played by Sam Neill as a notorious painter who lives on an estate in Australia where his art coexists side-by-side with an experiment in living.”

    (Actually, the central figure is not “vaguely inspired” by anyone. He is precisely inspired by an artist named exactly Norman Lindsay, as Roger will learn if he searches the Web. Roger also gets Pan wrong in this film; he says, “the bearded Lindsay is a Pan of sorts.” No. The “Pan of sorts” is in fact the girl who romps joyfully with the local boys and who later, with great amusement, uses her divine x-ray vision to view Tara Fitzgerald naked in church.),

    and, finally,

  5. Knowledge that, as the Greeks well knew,  there is a dark side to all this Pan business (Vivienne Browning’s book reveals that her father was a friend, not only of the bohemian artist Norman Lindsay, but also of the black mage Aleister Crowley. Let us pray that Hugh Grant’s performance as a clergyman in “Sirens” and as a defender of the faith in “The Lair of the White Worm” have prepared him to cope with the dark (or, sometimes, “Brown”) side of the divine.),

I hereby declare Hugh Grant an honorary Waco (home of the Dr. Pepper Museum, the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame, and the Armstrong Browning Library) Wacko.

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