Log24

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Theme and Variations

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 6:16 PM

(Continued)

IMAGE- The Diamond Theorem

Josefine Lyche’s large wall version of the twenty-four 2×2 variations
above was apparently offered for sale today in Norway —

Click image for more details and click here for a translation.

Sunday, March 10, 2019

Vocabulary for SXSW:

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM

Foursquare, Inscape, Subway 

Foursquare —

Inscape —

Subway —

Art installation, "Crystal Cult" by Josefine Lyche, at an Oslo subway station —

See also today's previous post.

Review

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:08 PM

Related material —

Nietzsche, 'law in becoming' and 'play in necessity'

Nietzsche on Heraclitus— 'play in necessity' and 'law in becoming'— illustrated.

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Portals

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:28 PM

Part I

Image- Josefine Lyche's work (with 1986 figures by Cullinane) in a 2009 exhibition in Oslo

Part II

Part III

Thursday, May 5, 2011

On Art and Magic

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 10:30 PM

Two Blocks Short of a Design:

A sequel to this morning's post on Douglas Hofstadter

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-ThemeAndVariations-Hofstadter.jpg

Photo of Hofstadter by Mike McGrath taken May 13, 2006

Related material — See Lyche's  "Theme and Variations" in this journal
and Hofstadter's "Variations on a Theme as the Essence of Imagination"
Scientific American  October 1982

A quotation from a 1985 book by Hofstadter—

"… we need to entice people with the beauties of clarity, simplicity, precision,
elegance, balance, symmetry, and so on.

Those artistic qualities… are the things that I have tried to explore and even
to celebrate in Metamagical Themas .  (It is not for nothing that the word
'magic' appears inside the title!)"

The artistic qualities Hofstadter lists are best sought in mathematics, not in magic.

An example from Wikipedia —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-BlockDesignTheory.jpg

Mathematics

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-WikipediaFanoPlane.jpg

The Fano plane block design

Magic

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-DeathlyHallows.jpg

The Deathly Hallows  symbol—
Two blocks short of  a design.

Sunday, February 20, 2011

Sermon

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 10:30 AM

From Galleri MGM in Oslo —

IMAGE- 'PRESS RELEASE' headline

Josefine Lyche
Theme and Variations
26. February – 28. March 2009
Opening reception 26. February 19.00 – 21.00

"Why do we remember the past, but not the future?"
Stephen Hawking, A Brief History of Time, Ch. 9, "The Arrow of Time"

"If you want a vision of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face – forever."
George Orwell

Galleri MGM is pleased to present the second solo exhibition by Josefine Lyche (b.1973).

Lyche presents a body of work consisting of sculptures and a wall painting, as well as a series of new paperwork, all using geometrical abstractions and light as a medium. Her work dissolves boundaries between fiction and documentation, depicting how fantasies and dreams collide with and yet help determine the shape of reality.

Theme and variations is a term most commonly used in the music genre as a musical form in which the fundamental musical idea, or theme, is repeated in altered form or accompanied in a different manner.

The exhibition explores geometric shapes and solids and revisits work of artists like Robert Morris and Ellsworth Kelly, giving it a disco treatment of glitter, neon and gloss. The mathematical, science-fiction and new age references incorporated in the works comments on the ambivalent foretelling of utopian hope and dystopian vision of a near, yet unknown future.

The transmission between past and future is shown in the sculpture "The Omega Point" a portal that leads in or out of time and space. …

A connection to today's earlier post, Sunday SchoolThe Oslo Version, from Friday, May 21, 2010.

Lyche's "Omega Point" portal, together with her last name, suggested three posts from the following Saturday morning— which later proved to be the date of Martin Gardner's death—

Art Space, Through the Lyche Gate and The Lyche Gate Asterisk.

For some further religious remarks, see November 9th, 2010— A Theory of Pure Design.

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Imago, Imago, Imago

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 11:07 AM

Recommended— an online book—

Flight from Eden: The Origins of Modern Literary Criticism and Theory,
by Steven Cassedy, U. of California Press, 1990.

See in particular

Valéry and the Discourse On His Method.

Pages 156-157—

Valéry saw the mind as essentially a relational system whose operation he attempted to describe in the language of group mathematics. “Every act of understanding is based on a group,” he says (C, 1:331). “My specialty—reducing everything to the study of a system closed on itself and finite” (C, 19: 645). The transformation model came into play, too. At each moment of mental life the mind is like a group, or relational system, but since mental life is continuous over time, one “group” undergoes a “transformation” and becomes a different group in the next moment. If the mind is constantly being transformed, how do we account for the continuity of the self? Simple; by invoking the notion of the invariant. And so we find passages like this one: “The S[elf] is invariant, origin, locus or field, it’s a functional property of consciousness” (C, 15:170 [2: 315]). Just as in transformational geometry, something remains fixed in all the projective transformations of the mind’s momentary systems, and that something is the Self (le Moi, or just M, as Valéry notates it so that it will look like an algebraic variable). Transformation theory is all over the place. “Mathematical science . . . reduced to algebra, that is, to the analysis of the transformations of a purely differential being made up of homogeneous elements, is the most faithful document of the properties of grouping, disjunction, and variation in the mind” (O, 1:36). “Psychology is a theory of transformations, we just need to isolate the invariants and the groups” (C, 1:915). “Man is a system that transforms itself” (C, 2:896).

Notes:

  Paul Valéry, Oeuvres (Paris: Pléiade, 1957-60)

C   Valéry, Cahiers, 29 vols. (Paris: Centre National de le Recherche Scientifique, 1957-61)

Compare Jung’s image in Aion  of the Self as a four-diamond figure:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100615-JungImago.gif

and Cullinane’s purely geometric four-diamond figure:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100615-FourD.gif

For a natural group of 322,560 transformations acting on the latter figure, see the diamond theorem.

What remains fixed (globally, not pointwise) under these transformations is the system  of points and hyperplanes from the diamond theorem. This system was depicted by artist Josefine Lyche in her installation “Theme and Variations” in Oslo in 2009.  Lyche titled this part of her installation “The Smallest Perfect Universe,” a phrase used earlier by Burkard Polster to describe the projective 3-space PG(3,2) that contains these points (at right below) and hyperplanes (at left below).

Image-- Josefine Lyche's combination of Polster's phrase with<br /> Cullinane's images in her gallery show, Oslo, 2009-- 'The Smallest<br /> Perfect Universe -- Points and Hyperplanes'

Although the system of points (at right above) and hyperplanes (at left above) exemplifies Valéry’s notion of invariant, it seems unlikely to be the sort of thing he had in mind as an image of the Self.

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Annals of Art History

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:00 AM

On Misplaced Concreteness

An excerpt from China and Vietnam: The Politics of Asymmetry, by Brantly Womack (Cambridge U. Press, 2006)—

The book is intended to be a contribution to the general theory of international relations as well as to the understanding of China and Vietnam, but I give greater priority to “the case” rather than to the theory. This is a deliberate methodological decision. As John Gerring has argued, case studies are especially appropriate when exploring new causal mechanisms.2  I would argue more broadly that the “case” is the reality to which the theory is secondary. In international relations theory, “realism” is often contrasted to “idealism,” but surely a more basic and appropriate meaning of “realism” is to give priority to reality rather than to theory. The philosopher Alfred North Whitehead defined the Fallacy of Misplaced Concreteness as “neglecting the degree of abstraction involved when an actual entity is considered merely so far as it exemplifies certain categories of thought.”3 In effect, the concept is taken as the concrete reality, and actual reality is reduced to a mere appendage of data. Misplaced Concreteness may well be the cardinal sin of modern social science. It is certainly pandemic in international relations theory, where a serious consideration of the complexities of real political situations is often dismissed as mere “area studies.” Like the Greek god Anteus who was sustained by touching his Mother Earth, theory is challenged and rejuvenated by planting its feet in thick reality.

2 John Gerring, "What Is a Case Study and What Is It Good For?"
   American Political Science Review  98:2 (May 2004), pp. 341-54
3 Alfred North Whitehead, Process and Reality
   (New York: Harper, 1929), p. 11

Remarks—

"Whitehead defined the Fallacy of Misplaced Concreteness…."

The phrase "misplaced concreteness" occurs in the title of a part of an exhibition, "Theme and Variations," by artist Josefine Lyche (Oslo, 2009). I do not know what Lyche had in mind when she used the phrase. A search for possible meanings yielded the above passage.

"In international relations theory, “realism” is often contrasted to “idealism….”

For a more poetic look at "realism" and "idealism" and international relations theory, see Midsummer Eve's Dream.

Sunday, May 30, 2010

Trilateral

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:01 AM

Image-- 'Greater East Asia' characters

"Greater East Asia" (大東亜 Dai-tō-a)
was a Japanese term
(banned during the post-war Occupation)
referring to Far East Asia. —Wikipedia

Image-- East Asia trilateral trade talks

Related historical remarks from Wikipedia

"From the Japanese point of view, one common principal reason stood behind both forming the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere and initiating war with the Allies: Chinese markets. Japan wanted their 'paramount relations' in regard to Chinese markets acknowledged by the U.S. government. The U.S., recognizing the abundance of potential wealth in these markets, refused to let the Japanese have an advantage in selling to China."

"Shine on, shine on,
there is work to be done
in the dark before the dawn."

Daisy May Erlewine

Image-- trilateral corner piece 'White Light (Grey)' by Josefine Lyche, 2009

"The exhibition title Theme and Variations
hints at the analytical-intellectual undertone
Josefine Lyche takes this time, but
not without humorous touches."

Sunday, May 23, 2010

Annals of Conceptual Art

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:02 AM

Josefine Lyche's
  "Theme and Variations" (Oslo, 2009)

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100523-LycheTandV.jpg

Some images in reply—

  Frame Tale

Image by R. T. Curtis from 'Further Elementary Techniques...'

Click on images for further details.

"In the name of the former
and of the latter
and of their holocaust.
  Allmen."

Finnegans Wake

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