Log24

Monday, November 21, 2011

Transition

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:00 PM

A search for images related to Joseph T. Clark, Society of Jesus,
(author* of a quote in today's noon entry) yields—

The Jewel in Venn's Lotus

(Click to enlarge.)

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111121-ClarkSearch-500w.jpg

"Heaven, I'm in heaven" — First words of "Purple Rose of Cairo"

* Very likely the same Joseph T. Clark, S. J. (1911-1989) who taught at Canisius College.

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

The Lotus Gate*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Image-- The Jewel in Venn's Lotus (Zen in Cuernavaca)
The Jewel
in Venn's Lotus

See also a prequel to
  Ramanujan's Flowering Tree

Flowering Judas.

* “Every city has its gates, which need not be of stone. Nor need soldiers be upon them or watchers before them. At first, when cities were jewels in a dark and mysterious world, they tended to be round and they had protective walls. To enter, one had to pass through gates, the reward for which was shelter from the overwhelming forests and seas, the merciless and taxing expanse of greens, whites, and blues–wild and free–that stopped at the city walls.

In time the ramparts became higher and the gates more massive, until they simply disappeared and were replaced by barriers, subtler than stone, that girded every city like a crown and held in its spirit.”

Mark Helprin, Winter’s Tale

Friday, February 5, 2010

The Great Brown

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 PM

Today's New York Times on a current theatrical presentation of The Great Gatsby

"Throughout the show, the relationship between what is read and its context keeps shifting, with the real world finally giving way entirely to the fictive one."

Owl Eyes in The Great Gatsby

"This fella's a regular Belasco."

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10/100204-DavidBrownSm.jpg

David Brown, producer. Brown died on Monday.

From The Diamond as Big as the Monster in this journal on Dec. 21, 2005–

"At the still point, there the dance is.” –T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets

Eliot was quoted in the epigraph to the chapter on automorphism groups in Parallelisms of Complete Designs, by Peter J. Cameron, published when Cameron was at Merton College, Oxford.

“As Gatsby closed the door of ‘the Merton College Library’ I could have sworn I heard the owl-eyed man break into ghostly laughter.” –F. Scott Fitzgerald

Related material: Yesterday's posts and the jewel in Venn's lotus.

Thursday, January 28, 2010

The Door into Summertime

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:29 AM

This journal on Aug. 17, 2008:

TIME photo of preacher Rick Warren embracing the Republican candidate (on his right) and the Democratic candidate (on his left)

That post linked to an earlier post illustrating
the triangle formed by Harvard, by the
Mystic River at Somerville, and
by Bunker Hill Community College–

Triangulation illustrated by Harvard, by Mystic River, and by Bunker Hill Community College

That post also linked to the Wikipedia article
Triangulation, which now states that
"Some members of the U.S. Democratic
Party, in particular the left, insist that
triangulation is 'dead.'"

Perhaps. Click the image below
for some background.

The Mystic Eye of Somerville, with the late Howard Zinn and the late Louis Auchincloss-- 'The eye you see him with is the same eye with which he sees you'-- Father Egan

For a view of Somerville from Harvard for Zinn,
see May 31, 2006. For a view of Summertime
for Auchincloss, see the NY Times obituary
of a political figure who died on Sunday.

On that day, this journal pictured a different
 metaphor from Robert Stone's Father Egan
the jewel in the lotus–

The Jewel in Venn's Lotus (photo by Gerry Gantt)

Euclid's classic construction
of the equilateral triangle
offers a different view of
the jewel in Venn's lotus–

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070701-Ratio.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

For a more poetic approach to
this metaphor, see Log24 on
another Sunday– July 1, 2007.

Happy birthday, Rick Warren.

Sunday, January 24, 2010

Today’s Sermon

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:00 AM

More Than Matter

Wheel in Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, 1913

(f) Poetry

The burden or refrain of a song.

⇒ "This meaning has a low degree of authority, but is supposed from the context in the few cases where the word is found." Nares.

You must sing a-down a-down, An you call him a-down-a. O, how the wheel becomes it! Shak.

"In one or other of G. F. H. Shadbold's two published notebooks, Beyond Narcissus and Reticences of Thersites, a short entry appears as to the likelihood of Ophelia's enigmatic cry: 'Oh, how the wheel becomes it!' referring to the chorus or burden 'a-down, a-down' in the ballad quoted by her a moment before, the aptness she sees in the refrain."

— First words of Anthony Powell's novel "O, How the Wheel Becomes It!" (See Library Thing.)

Anthony Powell's 'O, How the Wheel Becomes It!' along with Laertes' comment 'This nothing's more than matter.'

Related material:

Photo uploaded on January 14, 2009
with caption "This nothing's more than matter"

and the following nothings from this journal
on the same date– Jan. 14, 2009

The Fritz Leiber 'Spider' symbol in a square

A Singer 7-cycle in the Galois field with eight elements

The Eightfold (2x2x2) Cube

The Jewel in Venn's Lotus (photo by Gerry Gantt)

 

Thursday, July 16, 2009

Thursday July 16, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:00 PM
 
Mother of Beauty
continued from
April 7, 2004

In memory of Julius Shulman,
architectural photographer,
who died last night:

"And the lotos rose, quietly, quietly,
  The surface glittered out of heart of light…"

Four Quartets, quoted here
November 22, 2004

Photo by Gerry Gantt, and the Jewel in Venn's Lotus

"… as in the hearth and heart of light." 

Delmore Schwartz   

(See previous entry.)

Wednesday, January 14, 2009

Wednesday January 14, 2009

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:45 AM
Eight is a Gate

'The Eight,' by Katherine Neville

Customer reviews of Neville's 'The Eight'

From the most highly
rated negative review:

“I never did figure out
what ‘The Eight’ was.”

Various approaches
to this concept
(click images for details):

The Fritz Leiber 'Spider' symbol in a square

A Singer 7-cycle in the Galois field with eight elements

The Eightfold (2x2x2) Cube

The Jewel in Venn's Lotus (photo by Gerry Gantt)

Tom O'Horgan in his loft. O'Horgan died Sunday, Jan. 11, 2009.

Bach, Canon 14, BWV 1087

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