Log24

Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Surrealistic Pillow Talk

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM

   "Plan 9 deals with the resurrection of the dead.

IMAGE- Bill Murray explains Ed Wood's 'Plan 9 from Outer Space'- 'Plan 9 deals with the resurrection of the dead.'


"When the men on the chessboard
get up and tell you where to go . . ."

Thursday, May 9, 2019

The Birdseye Requiem

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:10 AM

From The Boston Globe  yesterday evening —

" Ms. Adams 'had this quiet intelligence that made you feel like
she understood you and she loved you. She was a true friend —
a true generous, generous friend. This is the kind of person
you keep in your life,' Birdseye added.

'And she had such a great sense of humor,' Birdseye said.
“She would always have the last laugh. She wasn’t always
the loudest, but she was always the funniest, and in the
smartest way.' "

"Ms. Adams, who lived in Waltham, was 55 when she died April 9 . . . ."

See as well April 9 in the post Math Death and a post from April 8,
also now tagged "Berlekamp's Game" — Horses of a Dream.

"When logic and proportion have fallen sloppy dead
And the white knight is talking backwards . . . ."

— Grace Slick in a song from yesterday's post "When the Men"

Tuesday, May 8, 2012

Staging the Self

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:29 AM
 
SPOILER ALERT

This post links to a column that
partially reveals the ending of
The Hunger Games  series of novels.

The title is from a column by Stanley Fish
on The Hunger Games  books in today's
online New York Times . The column
was posted at 9 PM EDT on May 7th, but I
did not see it until this morning.

Fish says—

"In the end… [spoiler details omitted]…
children… 'don’t know they play
on a graveyard'…."

For some literary background, see last night's post
on the May 7th, 2012, NY Times  obituaries as well
as the May 7th, 2006, Log24 post featuring 24 squares
arranged in a rectangular frame.

IMAGE- 4x6 grid

See also Frame Tales and, more generally,
The King and the Corpse.

"Et cetera, et cetera, et cetera." — Yul Brynner

Thursday, May 3, 2012

Child’s Play

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 PM

Click to enlarge

http://www.log24.com/log/pix12A/120503-Payne-Froebel-500w.jpg

"… a long seat, or a seat with a back,
     or a throne for the Queen;
     or again, a cross, a doorway, etc."

     — Joseph Payne

"… etc., etc." — Yul Brynner

Thursday, April 23, 2009

Thursday April 23, 2009

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:00 AM

 

The Geometry
of Language

(continued from April 16)

Background:

Professor Arielle Saiber with chess set

Click on the image for an
interview with the author of
Giordano Bruno and
the Geometry of Language
.

Related material:

Joyce on language —

The sigla of 'Finnegans Wake'

Bruno, Joyce, and coincidentia oppositorum

Cullinane on geometry —

Geometry of the I Ching (for comparison to Joyce's 'sigla')

Click on images for details.
 

Friday, January 18, 2008

Friday January 18, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Front page top center, online NY Times: Bobby Fischer Dead at 64

Friday January 18, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:00 AM

Nativity

… Todo lo sé por el lucero puro
que brilla en la diadema de la Muerte.

Rubén Darío,
born January 18, 1867

Thursday, January 17, 2008

Thursday January 17, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:24 PM
Well, she was
   just seventeen…
 
(continued)

"Mazur introduced the topic of prime numbers with a story from Don Quixote in which Quixote asked a poet to write a poem with 17 lines. Because 17 is prime, the poet couldn't find a length for the poem's stanzas and was thus stymied."

— Undated American Mathematical Society news item about a Nov. 1, 2007, event

Related material:

Desconvencida,
Jueves, Enero 17, 2008

Horses of a Dream
(Log24, Sept. 12, 2003)

Knight Moves
(Log24 yesterday–
anniversary of the
Jan. 16 publication
of Don Quixote)

Windmill and Diamond
(St. Cecilia's Day 2006)

Wednesday, January 16, 2008

Wednesday January 16, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:25 PM
Knight Moves:
Geometry of the
Eightfold Cube

Actions of PSL(2, 7) on the eightfold cube

Click on the image for a larger version
and an expansion of some remarks
quoted here on Christmas 2005.

Wednesday, June 20, 2007

Wednesday June 20, 2007

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:06 AM

Kernel

Mathematical Reviews citation:

MR2163497 (2006g:81002) 81-03 (81P05)
Gieser, Suzanne The innermost kernel. Depth psychology and quantum physics. Wolfgang Pauli's dialogue with C. G. Jung. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2005. xiv+378 pp. ISBN: 3-540-20856-9

A quote from MR at Amazon.com:

"This revised translation of a Swedish Ph. D. thesis in philosophy offers far more than a discussion of Wolfgang Pauli's encounters with the psychoanalyst Carl Gustav Jung…. Here the book explains very well how Pauli attempted to extend his understanding beyond superficial esotericism and spiritism…. To understand Pauli one needs books like this one, which… seems to open a path to a fuller understanding of Pauli, who was seeking to solve a quest even deeper than quantum physics." (Arne Schirrmacher, Mathematical Reviews, Issue 2006g)
 

An excerpt:

 

The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/PauliSquare.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

I do not yet know what Gieser means by "the innermost kernel." The following is my version of a "kernel" of sorts– a diagram well-known to students of anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss and art theorist Rosalind Krauss:

The four-group is also known as the Vierergruppe or Klein group.  It appears, notably, as the translation subgroup of A, the group of 24 automorphisms of the affine plane over the 2-element field, and therefore as the kernel of the homomorphism taking A to the group of 6 automorphisms of the projective line over the 2-element field. (See Finite Geometry of the Square and Cube.)

Related material:

The "chessboard" of
   Nov. 7, 2006
(as revised Nov. 7, 2012)–

I Ching chessboard. Previous version replaced on Nov. 7, 2012, by original 1989 chessboard arrangement

I Ching chessboard

None of this material really has much to do with the history of physics, except for its relation to the life and thought of physicist Wolfgang Pauli— the "Mephistopheles" of the new book Faust in Copenhagen. (See previous entry.)

"Only gradually did I discover
what the mandala really is:
'Formation, Transformation,
Eternal Mind's eternal recreation'"

(Faust, Part Two, as
quoted by Jung in
Memories, Dreams, Reflections)
 

Tuesday, November 7, 2006

Tuesday November 7, 2006

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM
A Game of Chess

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06B/061107-McQueen.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

"And these chessmen are men and women as they appear to themselves and to one another in this world. And the silver table is Time. And those who stand and watch are the immortal souls of these same men and women."

— C. S. Lewis,
The Great Divorce

I Ching chessboard

I Ching chessboard

Related material:

"At the still point,
there the dance is
"

and

Number and Time, by Marie-Louise von Franz
 

Tuesday, October 10, 2006

Tuesday October 10, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM
Mate

 

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04A/041010-Welles.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Orson Welles

Welles died on
this date in 1985,
the same day as
Yul Brynner.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051010-Yul2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

“The crème de la crème
of the chess world in a
show with everything
 but Yul Brynner

One Night in Bangkok

New York Lottery,
mid-day on Yom Kippur,
October 2, 2006:

256.

Pennsylvania Lottery,
mid-day on the same day:

723.

For more on 256,
see Symmetries
and 7/23.

It is a very difficult
philosophical question,
 the question of

  what ‘random’ is.”

Herbert Robbins, co-author
   of What is Mathematics?

Sunday, September 10, 2006

Sunday September 10, 2006

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 4:00 AM

And the
"
Meet Max Black"
Award goes to…

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060910-Obits.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

"For the Aeron and other designs,
Mr. Stumpf won this year’s
National Design Award
in Product Design
,
which is to be presented
posthumously on Oct. 18
by the Cooper-Hewitt
National Design Museum
in Manhattan."

— Today's New York Times

Stumpf died on August 30,
the date of the Log24 entry
"The Seventh Symbol."

Related material:

From
Geometry of the I Ching,
chessboard:

I Ching chessboard (original 1989 arrangement)

From the
 National Design Museum:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060910-DesignAwards.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

 From Log24 on the
date of Stumpf's death,

The Seventh Symbol:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060910-Box121.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Pictorial version of
Hexagram 20,
Contemplation (View)

See also
Fearful Symmetry
and
Symmetry Framed.

Friday, July 7, 2006

Friday July 7, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 AM
Born (some say)
on this date:
Yul Brynner

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060707-Brynner1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Mate in 6
(White moves.)

(White: Ke8, Nd7, Be5,
b5, e4, f2. Black: Ke6.
)

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060707-Problem.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Sevitov, 1938

(For solution, click here.)

Log24, July 3, 2006:

“… There was a problem laid out on the board, a six-mover. I couldn’t solve it, like a lot of my problems. I reached down and moved a knight….
I looked down at the chessboard. The move with the knight was wrong. I put it back where I had moved it from. Knights had no meaning in this game. It wasn’t a game for knights.”

— Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, begun in the summer of 1938

Log24, July 2, 2006:

Is a puzzlement!

Log24, July 5, 2006:

“In this way we are offered a formidable lesson for every Christian community.”

— Pope Benedict XVI on Pentecost, June 4, 2006, St. Peter’s Square.

Saturday, October 15, 2005

Saturday October 15, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:28 AM

Canon

A brief note to place Edward Bennett Marks, who died either on Saturday, October 8, 2005 (Washington Post), or on Monday, October 10, 2005 (New York Times), in my personal canon of saints.  Today’s New York Times says that Marks spent his career “aiding refugees as an executive of American and international agencies, both official and volunteer.”  This alone was commendable, but not miraculous.  The miraculous is contained in three words from the Log24 entry of October 10, the date of death of Orson Welles, of Yul Brynner, and perhaps of Marks: “All come home.”

For a rather different perspective on St. Yul Brynner, see “Shall We Dance?”–  a profile by Calvin Tomkins in this week’s New Yorker (issue dated 2005 10/17, posted 10/10) of an artist raised in Bangkok.  It is perhaps not irrelevant that the chess enthusiast Marcel Duchamp plays a prominent role in this piece.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051015-Duchamp2.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
 
Marcel Duchamp
 
Some other remarks on chess and art:

From Introduction to Aesthetics
(Log24, October 10, 2004) —

G. H. Hardy on chess problems:

“It is essential… (unless the problem is too simple to be really amusing) that the key-move should be followed by a good many variations, each requiring its own individual answer.”

According to the New York Times, Marks died on Oct. 10 (see related entry).

According to the Washington Post, Marks died on Oct. 8 (see related entry).

For some remarks on art by St. Edward, see UN Chronicle, Issue 4, 1998.

Monday, October 10, 2005

Monday October 10, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:00 AM
Starflight

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051010-Yul2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

“The crème de la crème
of the chess world in a
show with everything
 but Yul Brynner

One Night in Bangkok


 
Mate in 2,
 V. Nabokov, 1919,
“Starflight” theme

Today is the feast of St. Yul Brynner,
who died on this date in 1985.

“Head bent down over the guitar,
he barely seemed to hum;
 ended “all come home”;
….
Yule– Yul log for the
Christmas-fire tale-spinner–
of fairy tales that can come true.
 Yul Brynner.”

— Marianne Moore,
“Rescue with Yul Brynner

Related material:

Starflight, a year ago today

Pleiades, by Ivan Bunin, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1933, whose birthday is today

Natasha’s Dance (Log24, Jan. 8, 2004)

Star! by John Gregory Dunne (NY Review of Books, Jan. 15, 2004)

Sunday, September 22, 2002

Sunday September 22, 2002

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 8:02 PM

Force Field of Dreams

Metaphysics and chess in today’s New York Times Magazine:

  • From “Must-See Metaphysics,” by Emily Nussbaum:

    Joss Whedon, creator of a new TV series —

    “I’m a very hard-line, angry atheist” and
    “I want to invade people’s dreams.”

  • From “Check This,” by Wm. Ferguson:

    Garry Kasparov on chess

    “When the computer sees forced lines,
    it plays like God.”

Putting these quotations together, one is tempted to imagine God having a little game of chess with Whedon, along the lines suggested by C. S. Lewis:

As Lewis tells it the time had come for his “Adversary [as he was wont to speak of the God he had so earnestly sought to avoid] to make His final moves.” (C. S. Lewis, Surprised by Joy, Harcourt, Brace, and World, Inc., 1955, p. 216) Lewis called them “moves” because his life seemed like a chess match in which his pieces were spread all over the board in the most disadvantageous positions. The board was set for a checkmate….

For those who would like to imagine such a game (God vs. Whedon), the following may be helpful.

George Steiner has observed that

The common bond between chess, music, and mathematics may, finally, be the absence of language.

This quotation is apparently from

Fields of Force:
Fischer and Spassky at Reykjavik
. by George Steiner, Viking hardcover, June 1974.

George Steiner as quoted in a review of his book Grammars of Creation:

“I put forward the intuition, provisional and qualified, that the ‘language-animal’ we have been since ancient Greece so designated us, is undergoing mutation.”

The phrase “language-animal” is telling.  A Google search reveals that it is by no means a common phrase, and that Steiner may have taken it from Heidegger.  From another review, by Roger Kimball:

In ”Grammars of Creation,” for example, he tells us that ”the classical and Judaic ideal of man as ‘language animal,’ as uniquely defined by the dignity of speech . . . came to an end in the antilanguage of the death camps.”

This use of the Holocaust not only gives the appearance of establishing one’s credentials as a person of great moral gravity; it also stymies criticism. Who wants to risk the charge of insensitivity by objecting that the Holocaust had nothing to do with the ”ideal of man as ‘language animal’ ”?

Steiner has about as clear an idea of the difference between “classical” and “Judaic” ideals of man as did Michael Dukakis. (See my notes of September 9, 2002.)

Clearly what music, mathematics, and chess have in common is that they are activities based on pure form, not on language. Steiner is correct to that extent. The Greeks had, of course, an extremely strong sense of form, and, indeed, the foremost philosopher of the West, Plato, based his teachings on the notion of Forms. Jews, on the other hand, have based their culture mainly on stories… that is, on language rather than on form. The phrase “language-animal” sounds much more Jewish than Greek. Steiner is himself rather adept at the manipulation of language (and of people by means of language), but, while admiring form-based disciplines, is not particularly adept at them.

I would argue that developing a strong sense of form — of the sort required to, as Lewis would have it, play chess with God — does not require any “mutation,” but merely learning two very powerful non-Jewish approaches to thought and life: the Forms of Plato and the “archetypes” of Jung as exemplified by the 64 hexagrams of the 3,000-year-old Chinese classic, the I Ching.

For a picture of how these 64 Forms, or Hexagrams, might function as a chessboard,

click here.

Other relevant links:

“As you read, watch for patterns. Pay special attention to imagery that is geometric…”

and


from Shakhmatnaia goriachka

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