Log24

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Finnegans Kaleidoscope

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:28 AM

IMAGE- Philip Kitcher and David Albert read Finnegans Wake

In appreciation of their essays in last
Sunday’s New York Times Book Review ,
a link for David Albert and Philip Kitcher

Finnegans Kaleidoscope.

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Frame Tale

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:24 PM

From an academic's website:

IMAGE- Remarks by Paul Hertz, alias Ignotus the Mage

For Josefine Lyche and Ignotus the Mage,
as well as Rose the Hat and other Zingari shoolerim —

Sabbatha hanti, lodsam hanti, cahanna risone hanti :
words that had been old when the True Knot moved
across Europe in wagons, selling peat turves and trinkets.
They had probably been old when Babylon was young.
The girl was powerful, but the True was all-powerful,
and Rose anticipated no real problem.

— King, Stephen (2013-09-24).
     Doctor Sleep: A Novel
     (pp. 278-279). Scribner. Kindle Edition. 

From a post of November 10, 2008:

Twenty-four Variations on a Theme of Plato

Twenty-four Variations on a Theme of Plato,
a version by Barry Sharples based on the earlier
kaleidoscope puzzle  version of Steven H. Cullinane

The King and the Corpse  —

"The king asked, in compensation for his toils
during this strangest of all the nights he had
ever known, that the twenty-four riddle tales
told him by the specter, together with the story
of the night itself, should be made known
over the whole earth and remain eternally
famous among men."

Frame Tale: 

Finnegans Wake  —

"The quad gospellers may own the targum
but any of the Zingari shoolerim may pick a peck
of kindlings yet from the sack of auld hensyne."

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Early Nothing

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:29 AM

(Continued from yesterday)

Today's New York Times  obituaries —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110126-BruceGordon.jpg

From Wes Clark's site Web Noir

Scenes from "The Set-Up," a 1949 noir classic by Robert Wise

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110126-ParadiseCity.jpg

From Bruce Gordon's obituary in today's New York Times

"Mr. Gordon appeared on Broadway many times. He was in the original cast of the hit comedy 'Arsenic and Old Lace,' which opened in 1941 and starred Boris Karloff. Uncharacteristically, given his later résumé, Mr. Gordon played a policeman." —Margalit Fox

Related material —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101221-BrewsterSociety.jpg

(See Savage Solstice in this journal on December 21st, 2010.)

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Savage Solstice

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:20 PM

In memory of kaleidoscope enthusiast Cozy Baker, who died at 86, according to Saturday's Washington Post , on October 19th.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101221-BrewsterSociety.jpg

This journal on that date — Savage Logic and Savage Logic continued.

See this journal on All Saints' Day 2006 for some background to those posts—

“Savage logic works like a kaleidoscope whose chips can fall into a variety of patterns while remaining unchanged in quantity, form, or color. The number of patterns producible in this way may be large if the chips are numerous and varied enough, but it is not infinite. The patterns consist in the disposition of the chips vis-a-vis one another (that is, they are a function of the relationships among the chips rather than their individual properties considered separately). And their range of possible transformations is strictly determined by the construction of the kaleidoscope, the inner law which governs its operation. And so it is too with savage thought. Both anecdotal and geometric, it builds coherent structures out of ‘the odds and ends left over from psychological or historical process.’

These odds and ends, the chips of the kaleidoscope, are images drawn from myth, ritual, magic, and empirical lore. (How, precisely, they have come into being in the first place is one of the points on which Levi-Strauss is not too explicit, referring to them vaguely as the ‘residue of events… fossil remains of the history of an individual or a society.’) Such images are inevitably embodied in larger structures– in myths, ceremonies, folk taxonomies, and so on– for, as in a kaleidoscope, one always sees the chips distributed in some pattern, however ill-formed or irregular. But, as in a kaleidoscope, they are detachable from these structures and arrangeable into different ones of a similar sort. Quoting Franz Boas that ‘it would seem that mythological worlds have been built up, only to be shattered again, and that new worlds were built from the fragments,’ Levi-Strauss generalizes this permutational view of thinking to savage thought in general.”

– Clifford Geertz, “The Cerebral Savage: the Structural Anthropology of Claude Levi-Strauss,” in Encounter, Vol. 28 No. 4 (April 1967), pp. 25-32.

Related material  —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101221-TristesTropiques.jpg

See also "Levi-Strauss" in this journal and "At Play in the Field."

Monday, November 10, 2008

Monday November 10, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 10:31 AM

Frame Tales

From June 30

("Will this be on the test?")

Frame Tale One:

Summer Reading

The King and the Corpse: Tales of the Soul's Conquest of Evil

Subtitle:
Tales of the Soul's
Conquest of Evil

Frame Tale Two:

Barry Sharples
on his version of the
  Kaleidoscope Puzzle

Background:

"A possible origin of this puzzle is found in a dialogue
 between Socrates and Meno written by the Greek philosopher,
 Plato, where a square is drawn inside
a square such that
the blue square is twice the area  of the yellow square.

Plato's Diamond

Colouring the triangles produces a starting pattern
which is a one-diamond figure made up of four tiles
and there are 24 different possible arrangements."

Twenty-four Variations on a Theme of Plato

The King and the Corpse  —

"The king asked, in compensation for his toils during this strangest
of all the nights he had ever known, that the twenty-four riddle tales
told him by the specter, together with the story of the night itself,
should be made known over the whole earth
and remain eternally famous among men."

Frame Tale Three:

Finnegans Wake

"The quad gospellers may own the targum
but any of the Zingari shoolerim may pick a peck
of kindlings yet from the sack of auld hensyne."

Saturday, August 13, 2005

Saturday August 13, 2005

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:04 PM

Kaleidoscope, continued:

In Derrida’s Defense

The previous entry quoted an attack on Jacques Derrida for ignoring the “kaleidoscope” metaphor of Claude Levi-Strauss.  Here is a quote by Derrida himself:

“The time for reflection is also the chance for turning back on the very conditions of reflection, in all the senses of that word, as if with the help of an optical device one could finally see sight, could not only view the natural landscape, the city, the bridge and the abyss, but could view viewing. (1983:19)

— Derrida, J. (1983) ‘The Principle of Reason: The University in the Eyes of its Pupils’, Diacritics 13.3: 3-20.”

The above quotation comes from Simon Wortham,  who thinks the “optical device” of Derrida is a mirror.  The same quotation appears in Desiring Dualisms at thispublicaddress.com, where the “optical device” is interpreted as a kaleidoscope.

Derrida’s “optical device” may (for university pupils desperately seeking an essay topic) be compared with Joyce’s “collideorscape.”  For a different connection with Derrida, see The ‘Collideorscape’ as Différance.

Saturday, December 13, 2003

Saturday December 13, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:02 PM

We Are the Key:
The Shining of December 13

For James and Lucia Joyce

In the Orbit of Genius —
TIME, Dec. 1, 2003
:

“Once, when her mother asked if Joyce should visit her in the sanatorium, Lucia said, ‘Tell him I am a crossword puzzle, and if he does not mind seeing a crossword puzzle, he is to come out.’ “

Compare and contrast
with Finnegans Wake

From Roger Zelazny’s Eye of Cat:

“A massive, jaguarlike form with a single, gleaming eye landed on the vehicle’s hood forward and to the front.  It was visible for but an instant, and then it sprang away. The car tipped, its air cushion awry, and it was already turning onto its side before he left the trail.  He fought with the wheel and the attitude control, already knowing that it was too late.  There came a strong shock accompanied by a crunching noise, and he felt himself thrown forward.

DEADLY, DEADLY, DEADLY…
Kaleidoscope turning… Shifting  pattern within unalterable structure… Was it a mistake? There is pain with the power…  Time’s friction at the edges…  Center loosens, forms again elsewhere…  Unalterable?  But – Turn outward.  Here songs of self erode the will till actions lie stillborn upon night’s counterpane.  But – Again the movement…  Will it hold beyond a catch of moment?  To fragment…  Not kaleidoscope.  No center.  But again… To form it will.  To will it form.  Structure… Pain…  Deadly, deadly…  And lovely.  Like a sleek, small dog… A plastic statue… The notes of an organ, the first slug of gin on an empty stomach… We settle again, farther than ever before… Center. The light!… It is difficult being a god. The pain. The beauty. The terror of selfless –  Act!  Yes. Center, center, center… Here? Deadly…

necess yet again from bridge of brainbow oyotecraven stare decesis on landaway necessity timeslast the arnings ent and tided turn yet beastfall nor mindstorms neither in their canceling sarved cut the line that binds ecessity towarn and findaway twill open pandorapack wishdearth amen amenusensis opend the mand of min apend the pain of durthwursht vernichtung desiree tolight and eadly dth cessity sesame

We are the key.”

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