Log24

Sunday, June 19, 2016

Making Gatsby Great Again

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:24 PM

Image-- From the Diamond in Plato's Meno to Modern Finite Geometry

See also the previous post.

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

A Dark and Stormy May 29th

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:13 PM

He had come a long way to this blue lawn,
and his dream must have seemed so close
that he could hardly fail to grasp it.
He did not know that it was already behind him,
somewhere back in that vast obscurity
beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic
rolled on under the night.

F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

— Epigraph to Limitless: A Novel , by Alan Glynn

Glynn's novel was originally published in 2002 under the title
The Dark Fields

Compare and contrast —

Stephen King, 'IT,' plane, dark fields, school, bell, page 168, May 29

Stephen King's IT  was first published by Viking in 1986.

See as well the May 29th date mentioned by King.

Saturday, May 21, 2016

New Base

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:48 AM

Three reflections suggested by the previous post

1. A Whit Stillman film mentions favorably Scrooge McDuck —

2. A "promoted tweet" at the Twitter of the previous post's author leads to

3. The above phrase "New Base" suggests a related literary note —

Monday, November 3, 2014

Plan 9 Continues…

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:00 PM

A link to “Nine Tailors” in this journal may serve as
a memorial to the late David M. Abshire, who
reportedly died at 88 on Halloween.

See also tonight’s previous post and a remark by
Mira Sorvino in her version of The Great Gatsby .

Sunday, July 6, 2014

Smart Art

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:01 AM

“If you can bounce high, bounce for her too.”

– F. Scott Fitzgerald

IMAGE- Hugh Jackman bouncing, from Vanity Fair's Hollywood, June 8, 2014

Saturday, July 5, 2014

Jersey Girl

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:33 AM

“Oh, pretty baby…” — Frankie Valli at A Capitol Fourth  last night.

Related material — Mira Sorvino in The Great Gatsby .

“Jersey girls are tough.” — Garfield.

Sunday, March 16, 2014

Red to Green continues

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:00 PM

The New Yorker  of March 17 on
a New York literary family—

“First they were Communists, then liberals
(he was questioned by the House Committee
on Un-American Activities);
always they were avid party-givers.”

Gatsby believed in the green light… ”
— F. Scott Fitzgerald

“Why did the Pole spend all night outside the whorehouse?
He was waiting for the red light to turn green.”
— Blanche Knott, Truly Tasteless Jokes

Mira Sorvino in a  TV version of  The Great Gatsby 

“Are you my one o’clock?” — Adapted from Mighty Aphrodite

See as well Green Hunt.

Saturday, January 4, 2014

Learning Guide

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:08 PM

The late Adam Smith:

"Assume a can opener."

Wikipedia:

"The festival opened with The Great Gatsby
directed by Baz Luhrmann."

Midrash on an earlier film version (Mira Sorvino's, 2000):

"Daisy, when she comes to tea at Nick's house,
refers to the flowers brought by Gatsby as being
appropriate for a funeral and asks 'Where's the corpse?' 
Gatsby enters immediately thereafter. This foreshadows
what will happen to Gatsby. The dialogue is not in the novel…."

Learning Guide to The Great Gatsby

Correction to the midrash: 

Sorvino actually says, when there is a knock at the door,

"That must be the corpse."

Jersey girls are tough.

Update of Candlemas, 2014, in memory of Philip Seymour Hoffman—

Monday, September 2, 2013

Analogy

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:30 PM

From The New York Times Sunday Book Review  of Sept. 1, 2013—

THE GAMAL
By Ciaran Collins
Illustrated. 469 pp. Bloomsbury. Paper, $17.

Reviewed by Katharine Weber

Ten years ago, when Mark Haddon’s “Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time” turned up on the best-seller list and won a number of literary awards, the novel’s autistic narrator beguiled readers with his unconventional point of view. Today, even as controversy surrounds the revised classification of autism in the latest version of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the quirky yet remarkably perceptive points of view of autistic narrators have become increasingly familiar in every category of fiction, from young adult to science fiction to popular and literary fiction.

Like Haddon’s Christopher Boone, the narrator of Ciaran Collins’s remarkable first novel, “The Gamal,” has been encouraged by a mental health professional to write his story for therapeutic purposes. Charlie McCarthy, 25, is known in the West Cork village of Ballyronan as “the gamal,” short for “gamalog,” a term for a fool or simpleton rarely heard beyond the Gaeltacht regions of Ireland. He is in fact a savant, a sensitive oddball whose cheeky, strange, defiant and witty monologue is as disturbing as it is dazzling. …

The Gamal  features a considerable variety of music. See details at a music weblog.

This, together with the narrator's encouragement "by a mental health professional
to write his story for therapeutic purposes" might interest Baz Luhrmann.

See Luhrmann's recent film "The Great Gatsby," with its portrait of
F. Scott Fitzgerald's narrator, and thus Fitzgerald himself, as a sensitive looney.

The Carraway-Daisy-Gatsby trio has a parallel in The Gamal .  (Again, see
the music weblog's description.)  

The Times  reviewer's concluding remarks on truth, lies, and unreliable autistic
narrators may interest some mathematicians. From an Aug. 29 post

IMAGE- Barry Mazur: 'A good story is an end in itself.'

A different gamalog ,  a website in Mexico, is not entirely unrelated to
issues of lies and truth—

Sunday, July 21, 2013

Midnight Song

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 AM

For a modeling visionary— "All the Time."

Related material: Coco Rocha and Gatsby .

Update of 12:31 AM July 21— See also "For Doin' Evil."

Friday, April 12, 2013

An Education

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:59 PM

For little Colva The Mother Ship :

IMAGE- 'In Search of the Light: The Adventures of a Parapsychologist' (starring Serena Roney-Dougal and her daughter Colva)
.  .  .  .

For more light, see "Merton College" + Cameron
in this journal, as well as 

An Education

Leonardo DiCaprio and Carey Mulligan in Baz Luhrmann's
new version of The Great Gatsby :

IMAGE- Leonardo DiCaprio and Carey Mulligan in the new Gatsby film

We're going to Disney World!  

IMAGE- Baz Luhrmann's version of Gatsby's mansion

(For a more up-to-date version of little Colva,
see Primitive Groups and Maximal Subgroups.)

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Notable Transitions

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:37 AM

This morning's New York Times  gives a folklorist's
view of The Great Gatsby

"Daisy Buchanan, he argued in a 1960 article,
is a Jazz Age incarnation of the beautiful,
seductive Fairy Queen of Celtic lore."

— Margalit Fox, obituary of Tristram P. Coffin,
     who died at 89 on January 31st, 2012

See also…

Two screenshots in memory of fashion and fine-art photographer
Lillian Bassman, who died yesterday at 94—

IMAGE- Model Coco Rocha with poster of the film 'Hanna'

Update of 10:10 AM EST Wed., Feb. 15, 2012… 

In memory of Dory Previn, a song for "Hanna" and "Lord of the Rings" star Cate Blanchett.

Previn died yesterday, on Valentine's Day.  Perhaps an inspiration for a lyric by  Leonard Cohen?

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Old Sport

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:11 PM

From yesterday's Random Walk

IMAGE- Wallace Stevens, Collected Poems, page 474- 'An Ordinary Evening in New Haven,' Canto XIII
Followup—

IMAGE- NY lottery midday Wed., Feb. 8, 2012- 474, 1922

"Oh, hello, old sport."

The Great Gatsby

Tuesday, January 3, 2012

Dark Fields

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:10 PM

"He had come a long way to this blue lawn,
and his dream must have seemed so close
that he could hardly fail to grasp it.
He did not know that it was already behind him,
somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city,
where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night."

The Great Gatsby

http://www.log24.com/log/pix12/120103-Iowa-NYT.jpg

See also St. Andrew's Day, 2011, in this journal.

Thursday, May 6, 2010

The Great Clooney

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:31 PM

Image-- George Clooney in 'Ocean's 13'

NY Times -- Markets Plunge, Rebound

Click to enlarge.

"If you can bounce high, bounce for her too."

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Happy birthday, George.

Friday, February 5, 2010

The Great Brown

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 PM

Today's New York Times on a current theatrical presentation of The Great Gatsby

"Throughout the show, the relationship between what is read and its context keeps shifting, with the real world finally giving way entirely to the fictive one."

Owl Eyes in The Great Gatsby

"This fella's a regular Belasco."

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10/100204-DavidBrownSm.jpg

David Brown, producer. Brown died on Monday.

From The Diamond as Big as the Monster in this journal on Dec. 21, 2005–

"At the still point, there the dance is.” –T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets

Eliot was quoted in the epigraph to the chapter on automorphism groups in Parallelisms of Complete Designs, by Peter J. Cameron, published when Cameron was at Merton College, Oxford.

“As Gatsby closed the door of ‘the Merton College Library’ I could have sworn I heard the owl-eyed man break into ghostly laughter.” –F. Scott Fitzgerald

Related material: Yesterday's posts and the jewel in Venn's lotus.

Friday, November 21, 2008

Friday November 21, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:01 PM
Gatsby Starts Over:
Cleaning Up the
St. Olaf Mess

St. Olaf College,
Northfield, Minnesota —
From The MSCS Mess
(Dept. of Mathematics, Statistics,
and Computer Science)
November 14, 2008
Volume 37, Number 9

Math Film Festival 2008
The MSCS Department is sponsoring the second of two film-discussion evenings this Wednesday, November 19. Come to RNS 390 at 7:00 PM to see watch [sic] two short [sic]Whatchu  Know 'bout Math and Just a Finite Simple Group of Order Two— and our feature film, Good Will Hunting. Will Hunting is a mathematical genius who's living a rough life in South Boston, while being employed at a prestigious college in Boston, he's [sic] discovered by a Fields Medal winning mathematics Professor [sic] who eventually tries to get Will to turn his life around but becomes haunted by his own professional inadequacies when compared with Will. Professor Garrett will explain the “impossible problem” and its solution after the film.

Background:

Log24 entries of Wednesday, November 19, the day "Good Will Hunting" was shown:
Damnation Morning revisited and
Mathematics and Narrative continued
 

From a story in the November 21
 Chronicle of Higher Education
on a recent St. Olaf College
reading of Paradise Lost:

"Of man's first disobedience,
     and the fruit
Of that forbidden tree,
     whose mortal taste
Brought death into the World,
     and all our woe….

A red apple made the rounds,
each reader tempting the next."

________________________

"Do you like apples?"
Good Will Hunting   
 

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Wednesday November 19, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 5:01 PM

"Through the unknown,
remembered gate…."

Four Quartets

(Epigraph to the introduction,
Parallelisms of Complete Designs
by Peter J. Cameron,
Merton College, Oxford)

"It's still the same old story…."
— Song lyric

The Great Gatsby
Chapter 6:

"An instinct toward his future glory had led him, some months before, to the small Lutheran college of St. Olaf in southern Minnesota. He stayed there two weeks, dismayed at its ferocious indifference to the drums of his destiny, to destiny itself, and despising the janitor’s work with which he was to pay his way through."

There is a link to an article on St. Olaf College in Arts & Letters Daily  today:

"John Milton, boring? Paradise Lost  has a little bit of something for everybody. Hot sex! Hellfire! Some damned good poetry, too…" more»

The "more" link is to The Chronicle of Higher Education.

For related material on Paradise Lost  and higher education, see Mathematics and Narrative.

Friday, January 5, 2007

Friday January 5, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:26 AM
Time and the River

Front page of The New York Times Book Review, issue dated January 7, 2007:

“Time passes, and what it passes through is people– though people believe that they are passing through time, and even, at certain euphoric moments, directing time.  It’s a delusion, but it’s where memoirs come from, or at least the very best ones.  They tell how destiny presses on desire and how desire pushes back, sometimes heroically, always poignantly, but never quite victoriously.  Life is an upstream, not an uphill, battle, and it results in just one story: how, and alongside whom, one used his paddle.”

Walter Kirn, “Stone’s Diaries”

“So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”

F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

Wednesday, July 5, 2006

Wednesday July 5, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:00 PM
Entertainment
from today’s
New York Times

From the obituary of Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, who died at 52 on Monday, July 3, 2006, at her home in Santa Fe:

“If she rarely spoke of her private life, few artists have brought such emotional vulnerability to their work, whether it was her sultry portrayal of Myrtle Wilson, the mistress of wealthy Tom Buchanan in John Harbison’s ‘Great Gatsby,’ the role of her 1999 Metropolitan Opera debut, or her shattering performances several years ago in two Bach cantatas for solo voice and orchestra, staged by the director Peter Sellars, seen in Lincoln Center’s New Visions series, with the Orchestra of Emmanuel Music, Craig Smith conducting.

In Cantata No. 82, ‘Ich Habe Genug’ (‘I Have Enough’), Ms. Hunt Lieberson, wearing a flimsy hospital gown and thick woolen socks, her face contorted with pain and yearning, portrayed a terminally ill patient who, no longer able to endure treatments, wants to let go and be comforted by Jesus. During one consoling aria, ‘Schlummert ein, ihr matten Augen’ (‘Slumber now, weary eyes’), she yanked tubes from her arms and sang the spiraling melody with an uncanny blend of ennobling grace and unbearable sadness.”

Related Entertainment
from Nov. 6, 2003

Today’s birthday:
director Mike Nichols

Tuesday, April 11, 2006

Tuesday April 11, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:33 PM
Dallas

Part I,

from
The Circle is Unbroken,
May 2003:
 
Highballs

“If you can bounce high,
bounce for her too….”
 – F. Scott Fitzgerald,
epigraph to
The Great Gatsby

Magazine purchased at
newsstand May 14, 2003:

A Whiff of Camelot
as ‘West Wing’
Ends an Era

– New York Times,
 May 14, 2003

Song title from the
June Carter Cash
album “Press On“:

Gatsby’s Restaurant”

From The Great Gatsby,
Chapter Four:

“Highballs?” asked the head waiter.
“This is a nice restaurant here,”
said Mr. Wolfsheim, looking at the
Presbyterian nymphs on the ceiling.

Presbyterian Nymph:

Mimi Beardsley, JFK playmate,
in the news on May 15, 2003 

On JFK’s plane trips:
“Whenever the President traveled,
members of the press staff
traveled as well.
You always have a press secretary
and a couple of girls traveling….
 Mimi, who obviously couldn’t perform
 any function at all, made all the trips!”

Apparently there was some function…

“Don’t forget the coffee!”
– Punchline from the film
  “Good Will Hunting.”
Part II:

Today’s birthday:
Joel Grey

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06/060411-Grey1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Grey in “Conundrum,”
the final episode of Dallas

Related material:

Log24 on March 20, 2006

The image �http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051019-TwoSides.jpg� cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

— and the 5 previous entries.

Wednesday, December 21, 2005

Wednesday December 21, 2005

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 4:07 PM
For the feast of
St. Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald

The Diamond
as Big as
the Monster

From Fitzgerald’s The Diamond as Big as the Ritz:

    “Now,” said John eagerly, “turn out your pocket and let’s see what jewels you brought along. If you made a good selection we three ought to live comfortably all the rest of our lives.”
     Obediently Kismine put her hand in her pocket and tossed two handfuls of glittering stones before him.
    “Not so bad,” cried John, enthusiastically. “They aren’t very big, but– Hello!” His expression changed as he held one of them up to the declining sun. “Why, these aren’t diamonds! There’s something the matter!”
    “By golly!” exclaimed Kismine, with a startled look. “What an idiot I am!”
    “Why, these are rhinestones!” cried John.

From The Hawkline Monster, by Richard Brautigan:
 
    “What are we going to do now?” Susan Hawkline said, surveying the lake that had once been their house.
    Cameron counted the diamonds in his hand.  There were thirty-five diamonds and they were all that was left of the Hawkline Monster.
    “We’ll think of something,” Cameron said.

Related material:

“A disciple of Ezra Pound, he adapts to the short story the ideogrammatic method of The Cantos, where a grammar of images, emblems, and symbols replaces that of logical sequence. This grammar allows for the grafting of particulars into a congeries of implied relation without subordination. In contrast to postmodernists, Davenport does not omit causal connection and linear narrative continuity for the sake of an aleatory play of signification but in order to intimate by combinational logic kinships and correspondences among eras, ideas and forces.”

When Novelists Become Cubists:
    The Prose Ideograms of Guy Davenport,
    by Andre Furlani

“T.S. Eliot’s experiments in ideogrammatic method are equally germane to Davenport, who shares with the poet an avant-garde aesthetic and a conservative temperament.  Davenport’s text reverberates with echoes of Four Quartets.”

Andre Furlani

“At the still point,
  there the dance is.”

—  T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets,
quoted in the epigraph to
the chapter on automorphism groups
in Parallelisms of Complete Designs,
by Peter J. Cameron,
published when Cameron was at
Merton College, Oxford.

“As Gatsby closed the door of
‘the Merton College Library’
I could have sworn I heard
the owl-eyed man
break into ghostly laughter.”

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Saturday, October 29, 2005

Saturday October 29, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:07 PM
Aquarius Jazz

Adapted from Matisse
Adapted from Matisse

“The Jazz Age spirit flared
in the Age of Aquarius.”
— Maureen Dowd, essay
for Devil’s Night, 2005:
    What’s a Modern Girl to Do?

“I hope she’ll be a fool —
that’s the best thing a girl can be
in this world, a beautiful little fool.”
— Daisy Buchanan in Chapter I
of The Great Gatsby

“Thanks for the tip,
American Dream.”
Spider-Girl, in
Vol. 1, No. 30, March 2001

(Excerpts from
Random Thoughts
for St. Patrick’s Eve)

Tuesday, March 1, 2005

Tuesday March 1, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:16 PM

3/16 Continued

The New Yorker, issue dated March 7, 2005, on Hunter S. Thompson:

“… his true model and hero was F. Scott Fitzgerald. He used to type out pages from ‘The Great Gatsby,’ just to get the feeling, he said, of what it was like to write that way, and Fitzgerald’s novel was continually on his mind while he was working on ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,’ which was published, after a prolonged and agonizing compositional nightmare, in 1972. That book was supposed to be called ‘The Death of the American Dream,’ a portentous age-of-Aquarius cliché that won Thompson a nice advance but that he naturally came to consider, as he sat wretchedly before his typewriter night after night, a millstone around his neck.”

Louis Menand

Random Thoughts
for St. Patrick’s Eve

by Steven H. Cullinane
on March 16, 2001

“I hope she’ll be a fool — that’s the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool.”
— Daisy Buchanan in Chapter I of The Great Gatsby

“Thanks for the tip, American Dream.”
Spider-Girl, in Vol. 1, No. 30, March 2001

Log24.net, Feb. 21, 2005:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050221-TimeAndAgain.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Friday, May 16, 2003

Friday May 16, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:44 PM

Highballs

“If you can bounce high,
bounce for her too….”
 – F. Scott Fitzgerald, epigraph to
The Great Gatsby

Magazine purchased at
newsstand May 14, 2003:

A Whiff of Camelot
as ‘West Wing’
Ends an Era

– New York Times,
 May 14, 2003

Song title from the
June Carter Cash album “Press On“:

Gatsby’s Restaurant”

From The Great Gatsby, Chapter Four:

“Highballs?” asked the head waiter.
“This is a nice restaurant here,”
said Mr. Wolfsheim, looking at the
Presbyterian nymphs on the ceiling.

Presbyterian Nymph:

Mimi Beardsley, JFK playmate,
in the news on May 15, 2003 

On JFK’s plane trips:
“Whenever the President traveled,
members of the press staff traveled as well.
You always have a press secretary
and a couple of girls traveling….
 Mimi, who obviously couldn’t perform
 any function at all, made all the trips!”

Apparently there was some function….

“Don’t forget the coffee!”
– Punchline from the film
  “Good Will Hunting.”

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