Log24

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Horseness

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

"Art has to reveal to us ideas, formless spiritual essences."

— A character clearly talking nonsense, from the National Library section of James Joyce's Ulysses

"Unsheathe your dagger definitions. Horseness is the whatness of allhorse."

— A thought of Stephen Dedalus in the same Ulysses  section

For a representation of horseness related to Singer's dagger definitions in Saturday evening's post, see Generating the Octad Generator and Art Wars: Geometry as Conceptual Art.

More seriously, Joyce's "horseness" is related to the problem of universals. For an illuminating approach to universals from a psychological point of view, see James Hillman's Re-Visioning Psychology  (Harper Collins, 1977). (See particularly pages 154-157.)

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

D8ing

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 12:06 AM

(Continued)

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180813-Ezra_Brown-PSL(2,7)-GL(2,3)-Oct-2009.jpg

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180814-Knight_Moves-archived-May_9_2008-500w.jpg

Monday, August 13, 2018

Trojan Horsitude

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 3:33 AM
 

"It is said that the students of medieval Paris came to blows in the streets over the question of universals. The stakes are high, for at issue is our whole conception of our ability to describe the world truly or falsely, and the objectivity of any opinions we frame to ourselves. It is arguable that this is always the deepest, most profound problem of philosophy. It structures Plato's (realist) reaction to the sophists (nominalists). What is often called 'postmodernism' is really just nominalism, colourfully presented as the doctrine that there is nothing except texts. It is the variety of nominalism represented in many modern humanities, paralysing appeals to reason and truth."

— Simon Blackburn, Think,
    Oxford University Press, 1999, page 268


". . . a perfect triptych of horsitude"

James Parker on the 2007 film "Michael Clayton"

Related material —

Horsitude in the 4×2 grid, and

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180813-Structure_and_Sense-post-160606.gif

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180813-Knight_Moves-080116-page-top.gif

Wednesday, August 8, 2018

Synchronology

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 6:29 AM

Dates from math forums mentioned in the previous post

Dec. 7, 2016  and  Aug. 2, 2010.

Connoisseurs of synchonology may like to click on those dates.

8/8

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 6:00 AM

From mathoverflow.net on Dec. 7, 2016 —

The exceptional isomorphism between
PGL(3,2) and PSL(2,7): geometric origin?

Essentially the same question was asked earlier at

math.stackexchange.com on Aug. 2, 2010.

See also this  journal in November 2017 —

"Read something that means something."
                — New Yorker  ad

'Knight' octad labeling by the 8 points of the projective line over GF(7) .

Background — Relativity Problem in Log24.

Sunday, December 17, 2017

Concrete Universals

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:45 PM

The remarks on universals in the previous post linked to the following
note by James Hillman:

James Hillman, Re-Visioning Psychology
Harper Collins, 1977, p. 155 —

"Myths also make concrete particulars into universals,
so that each image, name, thing in my life when
experienced mythically takes on universal sense,
and all abstract universals, the grand ideas of
human fate, are presented as concrete actions." 
[See note 48.]

Note 48:  Cf. P. Wheelwright's discussion of concrete universality
in The Burning Fountain  (Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University
Press, 1968), pp. 52-54.

For Wheelwright's discussion, see the following excerpts from his book:

Pages 50-5152-5354-55.

Saturday, December 16, 2017

Dagger Definitions (Review)

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:30 AM

The previous post suggests a review of
the philosophical concept of universals —

A part of the above-mentioned 2011 "Saturday evening's post" that is
relevant to the illustration at the end of today's previous post —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110101-Singer377abridged.jpg

Note the whatness of Singer's  dagger definitions —

Triptychs

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:24 AM

Two readings by James Parker —

From next year's first Atlantic  issue

New Testament 'logos' in a review of a David Bentley Hart translation.

From last month's Atlantic  issue

"Let’s return to that hillside where Clayton exited his Mercedes.
In the gray light, he climbs the pasture. Halfway up the slope,
three horses are standing: sculpturally still, casually composed
in a perfect triptych of horsitude."

James Parker in The Atlantic , Nov. 2017 issue
 

Logos-related material 

Sunday, October 30, 2011

The Idea Idea

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:00 PM

For the late philosopher Peter Goldie, who died on October 22nd—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111029-Goldie33.jpg

Tom Wolfe, The Painted Word — "And there, at last, it was!"—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111030-MarkHelprin_WintersTale.jpg

See also Whiteness and Horseness.

Sunday, April 10, 2011

Rite of Spring

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:20 AM

Last night's Saturday Night Live

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110410-110409SNL-Cleavage.jpg

Related material— See  Cleavage.

Background— Yesterday evening's Star Quality as well as earlier posts on Horseness and Mysteries of Faith.

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Spring Style*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:00 AM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110223-VogueUK-Feb2011.jpg

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110223-PantomimeHorse.jpg

From www.4to40.com/poems/

* Suggested by yesterday's post on a Martin Harris Centre production of "Posh,"
  by last night's remarks on horseness and Guild Awards, and
  by last year's  February Mysteries of Faith.
 

Saturday, January 1, 2011

For a Dead Philosopher —

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:06 PM

Dagger Definitions

Part I

From 'Ulysses,' 1922 first edition, page 178-- 'dagger definitions'

Click for some background.

Part II

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110101-Singer377abridged.jpg

Click for some background.

Update of Jan. 2, 2011

Singer goes on to say that "A finite projective plane, PG (2, p), defined in this way is Pascalian and Desarguesian ; it exists for every prime and positive integer , and there is only one such PG (2, p) for a given p  and n …."

His definitions therefore deliberately exclude non -Desarguesian finite projective planes, which were known to exist at the time he wrote.

Thursday, January 29, 2009

Thursday January 29, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:23 AM
Dagger Definitions

From 'Ulysses,' 1922 first edition, page 178-- 'dagger definitions'
 
Midrash by a post-bac:

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Horseness is
the whatness of allhorse”:
Thingism vs. Thisness

By Amy Peterson

Jacques Derrida once asked the surly and self-revealing question, “Why is it the philosopher who is expected to be easier and not some scientist who is even more inaccessible?” As with philosophers generally, literary critics come with their own inaccessible argot, some terms of which are useful, but most of which are not and only add more loops to literary criticism’s spiraling abstraction. Take for example, James Wood’s neologism thisness (h/t: 3 Quarks Daily):

The project of modernity in Wood’s eyes is largely in revealing the contour and shape, the specific ‘feel’ of that essential mystery. He even borrows a concept from the medieval philosopher Duns Scotus, haecceitas or ‘thisness,’ to explain what he means: ‘By thisness, I mean any detail that draws abstraction toward itself and seems to kill that abstraction with a puff of palpability, any detail that centers our attention with its concretion.’ (my emphasis)

Wood is clearly taking his cue here from the new trend in literary criticism of referring to realism by its etymological meaning, thingism. Where thingism is meant to capture the materialism of late nineteenth and early 20th century Realist literature, thisness, it seems, is meant to capture the basic immaterialism of Modern realist literature. In this, it succeeds. Realism is no longer grounded in the thingism, or material aspect, of reality as it was during the Victorian era. In contemporary literature, it is a “puff of palpability” that hints at reality’s contours but does not disturb our essential understanding of existence as an impalpable mystery. So now we have this term that seems to encompass the Modern approach to reality, but is it useful as an accurate conception of reality (i.e. truth, human existence, and the like), and how are we to judge its accuracy?

I think that, as far as literature is concerned, the test of the term’s accuracy lies in the interpretation of the Modernist texts that Wood champions as truthful but largely abstract depictions of human experience:

‘Kafka’s ‘”Metamorphosis” and Hamsun’s “Hunger” and Beckett’s “Endgame” are not representations of likely or typical human activity but are nevertheless harrowingly truthful texts.’

For brevity’s sake, I’ll pick a passage from a different Modernist text that I think exemplifies the issues involved in the question of thingism and thisness’ reality. In James Joyce’s Ulysses, a pub discussionhttp://www.log24.com/images/asterisk8.gif of art’s purpose arises in which the writer Geoffrey Russell asserts that “Art has to reveal to us ideas, formless spiritual essences”; in his thoughts, Stephen Dedalus prepares to counter this:

Unsheathe your dagger definitions. Horseness is the whatness of allhorse. Streams of tendency and eons they worship. God: noise in the street: very peripatetic. Space: what you damn well have to see. Through spaces smaller than red globules of man’s blood they creepy crawl after [William] Blake’s buttocks into eternity of which this vegetable world is but a shadow. Hold to the now, the here, through which all future plunges to the past.

To give my best translation of Stephen-think: The physical being of the horse (“horseness”) grounds the over-arching, abstract idea of the horse (“allhorse”) in reality (“whatness”). God—the ultimate abstraction—is elusive and rarely manifests himself as a material reality (when listening to children playing earlier in the book, Stephen asserts that God is a “shout in the street”). Space—the material world—must be observed to make sense of abstract ideas (like God). Stephen’s opponents who believe that art must depict the abstract and the essential make claims about existence that have very little basis in material reality so that they can grasp at the divine through the work of such famously fantastic artists as William Blake, whose unrealistic poetry and paintings Stephen evidently holds in little esteem here, though he’s kinder to Blake elsewhere. Finally, the present makes concrete the abstract possibilities of the future by turning them into the realities of the past.

Ulysses elucidates the distinction between abstractly based and materially based realism because, while abstract to be sure, Joyce’s writing is deeply rooted in material existence, and it is this material existence which has given it its lasting meaning and influence. The larger point that I’m trying to make here is that material reality gives meaning to the abstract. (As a corollary, the abstract helps us to make sense of material reality.) There can be no truth without meaning, and there can be no meaning without a material form of existence against which to judge abstract ideas. To argue, as Wood does, that the abstract can produce concrete truths with little reference to material reality is to ignore the mutual nature of the relationship between material reality and truth. The more carefully we observe material reality, the more truth we gain from our abstractions of its phenomena, or, to state it in the vocabulary—though not the style—of literary criticism: thisness is a diluted form of thingism, which means that thisness is productive of fewer (and lesser) truths.

http://www.log24.com/images/asterisk8.gif “Space: what you
  damn well
     have to see.”

Amy Peterson
has failed to see
that the unsheathing
of dagger definitions
takes place not in
a pub, but in
The National Library
of Ireland
.

The Russell here is not
Geoffrey but rather
George William Russell,
also known as AE.

Related material:

Yesterday’s Log24 entry
for the Feast of
St. Thomas Aquinas,
Actual Being,”
and the four entries
that preceded it.

Powered by WordPress