Log24

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Juneteenth

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:09 PM

See Juneteenth in this journal.

For related meditations, see last October 27th.

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Valhalla Is Down

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:29 PM

Odin's Day continues. 

The title is a reference to the recent film
"Olympus Has Fallen," directed by Antoine Fuqua
(which I watched last night).

Related material:

Ascent to Valhalla,   Times Blackout,
and the post-blackout Times Obituaries.

Update of 6:45-7:59 PM Aug. 14:

See also (in keeping with the ART WARS
theme of today's previous post
Juneteenth (Wednesday, June 19) 2013.
This last link may be regarded as posted in
memory of author Vince Flynn, who reportedly
died at about 2 AM on that date. Background:
Tuesday, June 18.

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

R.I.P.

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:27 PM

Ein Eck

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:29 PM

"Da hats ein Eck" —

"you've/she's (etc.) got problems there"

St. Galluskirche:

St. Gallus's Day, 2012:

Click image for a St. Gallus's Day post.

A related problem: 

Discuss the structure of the 4x4x4 "magic" cube
sent by Pierre de Fermat to Father Marin Mersenne
on April 1, 1640, in light of the above post.

Hats

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:10 AM

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/19/obama-berlin-speech-live

Midnight in the Garden

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

(Continued)

See Robert Hughes in this journal.

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Mise-en-Scène

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 PM

IMAGE- 'Lexicon,' a novel by Max Barry published June 18, 2013

This journal on May 14, 2013:

IMAGE- Valéry on ornament in 'Method of Leonardo,' with Valéry's serpent-and-key emblem

"And let us finally, then, observe the
parallel progress of the formations of thought
across the species of psychical onomatopoeia
of the primitives, and elementary symmetries
and contrasts, to the ideas of substances,
to metaphors, the faltering beginnings of logic,
formalisms, entities, metaphysical existences."

— Paul Valéry, Introduction to the Method of
    Leonardo da Vinci

But first, a word from our sponsor

Friday, June 19, 2009

Friday June 19, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:59 PM
Midnight in
the Garden

  continued…

See

 Juneteenth through
Midsummer Night

and

 Juneteenth Revisited.

Saturday, October 25, 2008

Saturday October 25, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:01 AM
Actual Being

The New York Times Book Review online today has a review by Sam Tanenhaus of a new John Updike book.

The title of the review (not the book) is "Mr. Wizard."

"John Updike is the great genial sorcerer of American letters. His output alone (60 books, almost 40 of them novels or story collections) has been supernatural. More wizardly still is the ingenuity of his prose. He has now written tens of thousands of sentences, many of them tiny miracles of transubstantiation whereby some hitherto overlooked datum of the human or natural world– from the anatomical to the zoological, the socio-economic to the spiritual– emerges, as if for the first time, in the complete­ness of its actual being."

Rolling Stone interview with Sting, February 7, 1991:

"'I was brought up in a very strong Catholic community,' Sting says. 'My parents were Catholic, and in the Fifties and Sixties, Catholicism was very strong. You know, they say, "Once a Catholic, always a Catholic." In a way I'm grateful for that background. There's a very rich imagery in Catholicism: blood, guilt, death, all that stuff.' He laughs."

http://www.log24.com/log/pix08A/081025-Sting.jpg

RS 597, Feb. 7, 1991

Last night's 12:00 AM
Log24 entry:

Midnight Bingo

From this date six years ago:


It All Adds Up.

From this morning's newspaper,
a religious meditation I had not
seen last night:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix08A/081025-WizardOfIdSm.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Related material:

Juneteenth through
Midsummer Night, 2007

and

Church of the Forbidden Planet

Monday, October 20, 2008

Monday October 20, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:06 AM
Me and My Shadow

Thoughts suggested by Saturday's entry–

"… with primitives the beginnings of art, science, and religion coalesce in the undifferentiated chaos of the magical mentality…."

— Carl G. Jung, "On the Relation of Analytical Psychology to Poetry," Collected Works, Vol. 15, The Spirit in Man, Art, and Literature, Princeton University Press, 1966, excerpted in Twentieth Century Theories of Art, edited by James M. Thompson.

For a video of such undifferentiated chaos, see the Four Tops' "Loco in Acapulco."

"Yes, you'll be goin' loco
  down in Acapulco,

  the magic down there
  is so strong."

This song is from the 1988 film "Buster."

(For a related religious use of that name– "Look, Buster, do you want to live?"– see Fritz Leiber's "Damnation Morning," quoted here on Sept. 28.)

Art, science, and religion are not apparent within the undifferentiated chaos of the Four Tops' Acapulco video, which appears to incorporate time travel in its cross-cutting of scenes that seem to be from the Mexican revolution with contemporary pool-party scenes. Art, science, and religion do, however, appear within my own memories of Acapulco. While staying at a small thatched-roof hostel on a beach at Acapulco in the early 1960's, I read a paperback edition of Three Philosophical Poets, a book by George Santayana on Lucretius, Dante, and Goethe. Here we may regard art as represented by Goethe, science by Lucretius, and religion by Dante. For a more recent and personal combination of these topics, see Juneteenth through Midsummer Night, 2007, which also has references to the "primitives" and "magical mentality" discussed by Jung.

"The major structures of the psyche for Jung include the ego, which is comprised of the persona and the shadow. The persona is the 'mask' which the person presents [to] the world, while the shadow holds the parts of the self which the person feels ashamed and guilty about."

— Brent Dean Robbins, Jung page at Mythos & Logos

As for shame and guilt, see Malcolm Lowry's classic Under the Volcano, a novel dealing not with Acapulco but with a part of Mexico where in my youth I spent much more time– Cuernavaca.

Lest Lowry's reflections prove too depressing, I recommend as background music the jazz piano of the late Dave McKenna… in particular, "Me and My Shadow."

McKenna died on Saturday, the date of the entry that included "Loco in Acapulco." Saturday was also the Feast of Saint Luke.
 

Tuesday, July 24, 2007

Tuesday July 24, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:11 AM
The Church of St. Frank

See yesterday’s entries for
some relevant quotations
from Wallace Stevens.

Further quotations for what
Marjorie Garber, replying to
a book review by
Frank Kermode, has called
the Church of St. Frank“–

Frank Kermode on

Harold Bloom:

“He has… a great, almost
selfish passion for poetry,
and he interprets difficult
texts as if there were no
more important activity
in the world, which may
be right.”

Page 348 of Wallace Stevens:
The Poems of Our Climate
,
by Harold Bloom
(1977, Cornell U. Press):

“The fiction of the leaves is now Stevens’ fiction…. Spring, summer, and autumn adorn the rock of reality even as a woman is adorned, the principle being the Platonic one of copying the sun as source of all images….

… They are more than leaves
              that cover the barren rock….

They bear their fruit    
             so that the year is known….

If they are more than leaves, then they are no longer language, and the leaves have ceased to be tropes or poems and have become magic or mysticism, a Will-to-Power over nature rather than over the anteriority of poetic imagery.”

For more on magic, mysticism, and the Platonic “source of all images,” see Scott McLaren on “Hermeticism and the Metaphysics of Goodness in the Novels of Charles Williams.” McLaren quotes Evelyn Underhill on magic vs. mysticism:

The fundamental difference between the two is this: magic wants to get, mysticism wants to give […] In mysticism the will is united with the emotions in an impassioned desire to transcend the sense-world in order that the self may be joined by love to the one eternal and ultimate Object of love […] In magic, the will unites with the intellect in an impassioned desire for supersensible knowledge. This is the intellectual, aggressive, and scientific temperament trying to extend its field of consciousness […] (Underhill 84; see also 178ff.)

— Underhill, Evelyn. Mysticism: A Study in the Nature and Development of Man’s Spiritual Consciousness. New York: Dutton, 1911.

For more on what Bloom calls the “Will-to-Power over nature,” see Faust in Copenhagen and the recent (20th- and 21st-century) history of Harvard University. These matters are also discussed in “Log24 – Juneteenth through Midsummer Night.”

For more on what Underhill calls “the intellectual, aggressive, and scientific temperament trying to extend its field of consciousness,” see the review, in the August 2007 Notices of the American Mathematical Society, of a book by Douglas Hofstadter– a writer on the nature of consciousness— by magician Martin Gardner.

Wednesday, June 27, 2007

Wednesday June 27, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:33 PM
 
Juneteenth Revisited:
A Long and Strange Day

 
Time and chance
yesterday:

Pennsylvania Lottery
  June 26, 2007–
Mid-day 040
Evening 810

040:

A discussion of the work of Ralph Ellison:

"… why do you think he did not finish these novels? He wrote on them for many, many years– 40 years, I think."

"Yes, he worked for 40 years."

See Ellison's novel Juneteenth (New York Times review, 1999)

810:

August 10 (8/10), 2004

"But all things then were oracle and secret.
Remember the night when,
    lost, returning, we turned back
Confused, and our headlights
    singled out the fox?
Our thoughts went with it then,
    turning and turning back
   With the same terror,
                into the deep thicket
   Beside the highway,
                at home in the dark thicket.

I say the wood within is the dark wood…."

Donald Justice, "Sadness"

John Baez, Diary, entry of June 22, 2007:

"On Tuesday the 19th….

I hiked down the completely dark but perfectly familiar gravel road with my suitcase in hand, listening to the forest creatures. But then, I couldn't find my parents' driveway! It was embarrassing: I could see their house perfectly well, off in the distance, but it was so darn dark I couldn't spot the driveway. It felt like a dream: after a long flight with many delays, one winds up walking to ones parents house, lost in a spooky forest….

… I sort of enjoy this kind of thing, as long as there's no real danger. It's also sort of scary. The well-lit grid of civilization slowly falls away, and you're out there alone in the night…

Anyway: I considered hiking straight through the woods to my parents' house, but I decided things were already interesting enough, so instead I called my mom and ask her to drive down the driveway a bit, just so I could see where it was. And so she did, and then it was obvious.

So, I got home shortly before midnight. A long and strange day. My dad was already in bed, but I said hi to him anyway."

Related material:

Juneteenth through
Midsummer Night

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