Log24

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Church and Temple

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 10:48 AM

Sunday, April 10, 2016

Bodies for Crosses

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:59 PM

The saying of poet Mary Karr that
"there is a body  on the cross in my church,"
together with the crosses of the previous post
suggests a synchronicity check of the
date  discussed in that post —

“Be serious, because
The stone may have contempt
For too-familiar hands”

— Adrienne Rich in “The Diamond Cutters” (1955)

Blackboard Jungle , 1955 —

IMAGE- Richard Kiley in 'Blackboard Jungle,' with grids and broken records

Space crosses, simple and not-so-simple

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

The Crosswicks Curse

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:08 PM

Continues.

It was a dark and stormy night 

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110420-DarkAndStormy-Logicomix.jpg

— Page 180, Logicomix

Sunday, September 1, 2013

The Crossword Omen

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 5:48 AM

August 30, 11:01 AM  Comment-Worthy

August 30, 12:00 PM  Hymn

August 30, 7:20 PM  Her

August 31, 8:23 PM  What Where

September 1, 5:48 AM  The Crossword Omen —

IMAGE- Crossword Nexus site, with top photo of word 'OMEN,' giving 'BUM' as the leading possible answer to the clue 'London derriere'

Related material: A critic's remarks on the missing character "Bum"
in Beckett's play "What Where" and Rimbaud on the vowel "U"—

(Click to enlarge.)

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

The Crosswicks Curse

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

(Continued)

"There is  such a thing as a tesseract." —A novel from Crosswicks

Related material from a 1905 graduate of Princeton,
"The 3-Space PG(3,2) and Its Group," is now available
at Internet Archive (1 download thus far).

The 3-space paper is relevant because of the
connection of the group it describes to the
"super, overarching" group of the tesseract.

Saturday, March 16, 2013

The Crosswicks Curse

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:00 PM

Continues.

From the prologue to the new Joyce Carol Oates
novel Accursed

"This journey I undertake with such anticipation
is not one of geographical space but one of Time—
for it is the year 1905 that is my destination.

1905!—the very year of the Curse."

Today's previous post supplied a fanciful link
between the Crosswicks Curse of Oates and
the Crosswicks tesseract  of Madeleine L'Engle.

The Crosswicks Curse according to L'Engle
in her classic 1962 novel A Wrinkle in Time —

"There is  such a thing as a tesseract."

A tesseract is a 4-dimensional hypercube that
(as pointed out by Coxeter in 1950) may also 
be viewed as a 4×4 array (with opposite edges
identified).

Meanwhile, back in 1905

For more details, see how the Rosenhain and Göpel tetrads occur naturally
in the diamond theorem model of the 35 lines of the 15-point projective
Galois space PG(3,2).

See also Conwell in this journal and George Macfeely Conwell in the
honors list of the Princeton Class of 1905.

Monday, December 27, 2010

Church Diamond

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 3:09 PM

IMAGE- The diamond property

Also known, roughly speaking, as confluence  or the Church-Rosser property.

From “NYU Lambda Seminar, Week 2” —

[See also the parent page Seminar in Semantics / Philosophy of Language or:
What Philosophers and Linguists Can Learn From Theoretical Computer Science But Didn’t Know To Ask)
]

A computational system is said to be confluent, or to have the Church-Rosser or diamond property, if, whenever there are multiple possible evaluation paths, those that terminate always terminate in the same value. In such a system, the choice of which sub-expressions to evaluate first will only matter if some of them but not others might lead down a non-terminating path.

The untyped lambda calculus is confluent. So long as a computation terminates, it always terminates in the same way. It doesn’t matter which order the sub-expressions are evaluated in.

A computational system is said to be strongly normalizing if every permitted evaluation path is guaranteed to terminate. The untyped lambda calculus is not strongly normalizing: ω ω doesn’t terminate by any evaluation path; and (\x. y) (ω ω) terminates only by some evaluation paths but not by others.

But the untyped lambda calculus enjoys some compensation for this weakness. It’s Turing complete! It can represent any computation we know how to describe. (That’s the cash value of being Turing complete, not the rigorous definition. There is a rigorous definition. However, we don’t know how to rigorously define “any computation we know how to describe.”) And in fact, it’s been proven that you can’t have both. If a computational system is Turing complete, it cannot be strongly normalizing.

There is no connection, apart from the common reference to an elementary geometric shape, between the use of “diamond” in the above Church-Rosser sense and the use of “diamond” in the mathematics of (Cullinane’s) Diamond Theory.

Any attempt to establish such a connection would, it seems, lead quickly into logically dubious territory.

Nevertheless, in the synchronistic spirit of Carl Jung and Arthur Koestler, here are some links to such a territory —

 Link One — “Insane Symmetry”  (Click image for further details)—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101227-InsaneSymmetry.jpg

See also the quilt symmetry in this  journal on Christmas Day.

Link Two — Divine Symmetry

(George Steiner on the Name in this journal on Dec. 31 last year (“All about Eve“)) —

“The links are direct between the tautology out of the Burning Bush, that ‘I am’ which accords to language the privilege of phrasing the identity of God, on the one hand, and the presumptions of concordance, of equivalence, of translatability, which, though imperfect, empower our dictionaries, our syntax, our rhetoric, on the other. That ‘I am’ has, as it were, at an overwhelming distance, informed all predication. It has spanned the arc between noun and verb, a leap primary to creation and the exercise of creative consciousness in metaphor. Where that fire in the branches has gone out or has been exposed as an optical illusion, the textuality of the world, the agency of the Logos in logic—be it Mosaic, Heraclitean, or Johannine—becomes ‘a dead letter.'”

George Steiner, Grammars of Creation

(See also, from Hanukkah this year,  A Geometric Merkabah and The Dreidel is Cast.)

Link Three – Spanning the Arc —

Part A — Architect Louis Sullivan on “span” (see also Kindergarten at Stonehenge)

Part B — “Span” in category theory at nLab —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101227-nLabSpanImage.jpg

Also from nLab — Completing Spans to Diamonds

“It is often interesting whether a given span in some partial ordered set can be completed into a diamond. The property of a collection of spans to consist of spans which are expandable into diamonds is very useful in the theory of rewriting systems and producing normal forms in algebra. There are classical results e.g. Newman’s diamond lemma, Širšov-Bergman’s diamond lemma (Širšov is also sometimes spelled as Shirshov), and Church-Rosser theorem (and the corresponding Church-Rosser confluence property).”

The concepts in this last paragraph may or may not have influenced the diamond theory of Rudolf Kaehr (apparently dating from 2007).

They certainly have nothing to do with the Diamond Theory of Steven H. Cullinane (dating from 1976).

For more on what the above San Francisco art curator is pleased to call “insane symmetry,” see this journal on Christmas Day.

For related philosophical lucubrations (more in the spirit of Kaehr than of Steiner), see the New York Times  “The Stone” essay “Span: A Remembrance,” from December 22—

“To understand ourselves well,” [architect Louis] Sullivan writes, “we must arrive first at a simple basis: then build up from it.”

Around 300 BC, Euclid arrived at this: “A point is that which has no part. A line is breadthless length.”

See also the link from Christmas Day to remarks on Euclid and “architectonic” in Mere Geometry.

Wednesday, April 15, 2020

“Causal Invariance” According to Wolfram

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:40 AM

Stephen Wolfram yesterday —

“Causal invariance may at first seem like a rather obscure property.
But in the context of our models, we will see in what follows that
it may in fact be the key to a remarkable range of fundamental features
of physics, including relativistic invariance, general covariance, and
local gauge invariance, as well as the possibility of objective reality in
quantum mechanics.”

From . . .

Tuesday, April 14, 2020

Confluence, or:

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:21 PM

Church Diamond   Continued

The above article leads to remarks by Stephen Wolfram published today :

See also “Invariance” as the title of the previous post  here.

Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Tiger’s Leap  to 1905

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:03 PM

Walter Benjamin on 'a tiger's leap into the past'

See other posts
now tagged
Crosswicks Curse.

 

Click to enlarge:

Block Designs?

Sunday, August 25, 2019

An Epstein Requiem

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:21 PM

"Look at what you've done
Why, you've become a grown-up girl"

See also September Morn in this  journal.

Design Theory

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 7:58 PM

"Mein Führer Steiner"

See Hitler Plans and Quadruple System.

"There is  such a thing as a quadruple system."

— Saying adapted from a 1962 young-adult novel

Friday, August 9, 2019

Design Theory

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 6:48 PM

Click to enlarge:

Block Designs?

Monday, July 8, 2019

Exploring Schoolgirl Space

See also "Quantum Tesseract Theorem" and "The Crosswicks Curse."

Sunday, October 14, 2018

Logos

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:00 AM

New and old AMS logos —

I prefer the old.  Related material —

For an old Crosswicks curse, see that phrase in this journal.

For a new curse, see . . .

    "Unsheathe your dagger definitions." — James Joyce.

Monday, August 6, 2018

Summer in Philadelphia

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:59 PM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180806-Old_City_Hall-Philadelphia.jpg

See also this  journal on June 21st, 2013.

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Review

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 5:52 PM

The title of the previous post, "Church and Temple," together
with today's online New York Times  obituaries for singer 
Lara Saint Paul (d. May 8) and playwright Leah Rose Napolin
(d. May 13), suggests a review

See as well a Log24 search for Isaac Singer.

Same Old Story

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 9:00 AM

. . . as time goes by.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Something to Behold

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:45 PM

From a review of a Joyce Carol Oates novel
at firstthings.com on August 23, 2013 —

"Though the Curse is eventually exorcised,
it is through an act of wit and guile,
not an act of repentance or reconciliation.
And so we may wonder if Oates has put this story
to rest, or if it simply lays dormant. A twenty-first
century eruption of the 'Crosswicks Curse
would be something to behold." [Link added.]

Related material —

A film version of A Wrinkle in Time

The Hamilton watch from "Interstellar" (2014) —

See also a post, Vacant Space, from 8/23/13 (the date
of the above review), and posts tagged Space Writer.

Sunday, August 13, 2017

Compare and Contrast

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 1:00 PM

From The Atlantic , September 2017 issue, online —
"How America Lost Its Mind," by former Harvard Lampoon  
writer Kurt Andersen

The Atlantic 's embedded Google ad for "Quantum Space Elements"
is, by the way, completely unrelated to similar-sounding work on 
models of space in finite geometry (cf. tsimtsum . . .

Friday, August 11, 2017

Symmetry’s Lifeboat

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 9:16 PM

A post suggested by the word tzimtzum  (see Wednesday)
or tsimtsum  (see this morning) —

Lifeboat from the Tsimtsum  in Life of Pi  —

Another sort of tsimtsum, contracting infinite space to a finite space —

IMAGE- Desargues's theorem in light of Galois geometry

Friday, October 23, 2015

Retro or Not?

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Happy birthday to the late Michael Crichton (Harvard ’64).

See also Diamond Theory Roulette —

Part of the ReCode Project (http://recodeproject.com).
Based on "Diamond Theory" by Steven H. Cullinane,
originally published in "Computer Graphics and Art" 
Vol. 2 No. 1, February 1977.
Copyright (c) 2013 Radames Ajna 
— OSI/MIT license (http://recodeproject/license).

Related remarks on Plato for Harvard’s
Graduate School of Design

See also posts from the above publication date, March 31,
2006, among posts now tagged “The Church in Philadelphia.”

Saturday, September 26, 2015

Symbols, Local and Global

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:19 PM

Local:

Photo by Jimmy Emerson, DVM

Global

Photo by Brendan Smialowski today

Msgr. Mark Miles, the Pope's translator, at
Independence Hall in Philadelphia today.

What, if anything, the Church means by the symbol
he holds is not clear, but presumably its meaning,
if there is one, is more global than local.

Friday, May 2, 2014

Midrash

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM

From today's 3 AM (ET) post "Quote":

“You’ve got to decide which side of the cross you’re on."

Perhaps both? See yesterday morning's Jerusalem Post —

"Although he was one of Israel’s best known
secular, leftwing bohemians, he achieved
some of his greatest success as an actor
playing as ultra-Orthodox and national-religious
characters."

See also a similar ambiguity in Damnation Morning.

Quote

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:00 AM

"You've got to decide which side of the cross you're on.
I need nailers, not hangers."

Body of Lies

Friday, March 14, 2014

The Search for Charles Wallace

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:19 PM

The search in the previous post for the source of a quotation from Poincaré yielded, as a serendipitous benefit, information on an interesting psychoanalyst named Wilfred Bion (see the Poincaré  quotation at a webpage on Bion). This in turn suggested a search for the source of the name of author Madeleine L'Engle's son Bion, who may have partly inspired L'Engle's fictional character Charles Wallace.  Cynthia Zarin wrote about Bion in The New Yorker  of April 12, 2004 that

"According to the family, he is the person for whom L’Engle’s insistence on blurring fiction and reality had the most disastrous consequences."

Also from that article, material related to the name Bion and to what this journal has called "the Crosswicks Curse"*—

"Madeleine L’Engle Camp was born in 1918 in New York City, the only child of Madeleine Hall Barnett, of Jacksonville, Florida, and Charles Wadsworth Camp, a Princeton man and First World War veteran, whose family had a big country place in New Jersey, called Crosswicks. In Jacksonville society, the Barnett family was legendary: Madeleine’s grandfather, Bion Barnett, the chairman of the board of Jacksonville’s Barnett Bank, had run off with a woman to the South of France, leaving behind a note on the mantel. Her grandmother, Caroline Hallows L’Engle, never recovered from the blow. ….

… The summer after Hugh and Madeleine were married, they bought a dilapidated farmhouse in Goshen, in northwest Connecticut. Josephine, born in 1947, was three years old when they moved permanently to the house, which they called Crosswicks. Bion was born just over a year later."

* "There is  such a thing as a tesseract."

Saturday, March 8, 2014

Women’s History Month

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 PM

For the Princeton Class of 1905 —

Joyce Carol Oates Meets Emily Dickinson.

Oates —

"It is an afternoon in autumn, near dusk.
The western sky is a spider’s web of translucent gold.
I am being brought by carriage—two horses—
muted thunder of their hooves—
along narrow country roads between hilly fields
touched with the sun’s slanted rays,
to the village of Princeton, New Jersey.
The urgent pace of the horses has a dreamlike air,
like the rocking motion of the carriage;
and whoever is driving the horses
his face I cannot see, only his back—
stiff, straight, in a tight-fitting dark coat."

Dickinson —

"Because I could not stop for Death—
He kindly stopped for me—
The Carriage held but just Ourselves—
And Immortality."

Saturday, August 31, 2013

What Where

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:23 PM

The news item at lower right in the above image, with the phrase "surprise U-turn,"
suggests some remarks related to this summer's Enniskillen festival.

Friday, August 30, 2013

Her

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 7:20 PM

(A sequel to today's noon post, Hymn)

Portrait, in the 2013 film Oblivion , of  a 2005 graduate
of London's Royal Academy of Dramatic Art —

London derrière.

Hymn

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Londonderry Air

"By recalling the past and freezing the present
he could open the gates of time…."

— Mark Helprin,  In Sunlight and in Shadow

Comment-Worthy

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:01 AM

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Tag (Part II)

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:29 AM

(Continued from yesterday evening)

Madeleine L'Engle in The Irrational Season
(1977), Chapter 9:

"After A Wrinkle in Time  was finally published,
it was pointed out to me that the villain, a naked
disembodied brain, was called 'It' because It
stands for Intellectual truth as opposed to a truth
which involves the whole of us, heart as well as
mind.  That acronym had never occurred to me. 
I chose the name It intuitively, because an IT
does not have a heart or soul.  And I did not
understand consciously at the time of writing
that the intellect, when it is not informed by
the heart, is evil."

You're…  IT.

Related material: Mathematics as a Post-Communist Activity.

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

Cover Acts

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

The Daily Princetonian  today:

IMAGE- 'How Jay White, a Neil Diamond cover act, duped Princeton'

A different cover act, discussed here  Saturday:

IMAGE- The diamond theorem affine group of order 322,560, published without acknowledgment of its source by the Mathematical Association of America in 2011

See also, in this journal, the Galois tesseract and the Crosswicks Curse.

"There is  such a thing as a tesseract." — Crosswicks saying

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Labyrinth 23

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 7:00 PM

The title refers to a search (see below)
suggested by three things—

  1. David Foster Wallace biographer D. T. Max
    "There's a note in one of my files where he says something like,
    'Infinite Jest  was just a means to Mary Karr's end, as it were.' "

  2. "There is a body  on  the cross in my church ." —Mary Karr

  3. A body.

The search Labyrinth 23.

(Within the search results, note particularly the post "The Infinity Point.")

Saturday, March 21, 2009

Saturday March 21, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:30 PM
Interpreter's Booth

Tonight's online New York Times:

NY Times  online March 21, 2009: Pope in Angola tells clergy to work against belief in witchcraft

Click to enlarge.


Mary Karr,
"Facing Altars:
    Poetry and Prayer"–

"There is a body
on the cross
  in my church."


Sean Penn gives Nicole Kidman his card in 'The Interpreter'

Sean Penn and Nicole Kidman
in "The Interpreter."

Click to enlarge.

"My card."

"Is Heart of Darkness the story of Kurtz or the story of Marlow’s experience of Kurtz?  Was Marlow invented as a rhetorical device for heightening the meaning of Kurtz’s moral collapse, or was Kurtz invented in order to provide Marlow with the centre of his experience in the Congo?  Again a seamless web, and we tell ourselves that the old-fashioned question 'Who is the protagonist?' is a meaningless one."


Wayne C. Booth, p. 346 in
The Rhetoric of Fiction
(1961),
as quoted by Paul Wake in
"The Storyteller in Chance"

Monday, July 28, 2008

Monday July 28, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM
Continued

“There is a body on
the cross in my church.”
— Mary Karr, quoted 
here on July 10, 2007

From Jan. 20, 2004,
opening day of the first
Tennessee lottery–

Song of the Father

“Gonna buy me a shotgun,
long as I am tall,
Buy me a shotgun,
long as I am tall,
Gonna shoot po’ Thelma,
just to see her jump and fall.”

— Jimmie Rodgers, known as
the father of country music.”

Monday, July 16, 2007

Monday July 16, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:06 AM
Confirmation

“They took all the trees,
put ’em in a tree museum
and they charged the people
a dollar and a half just to see ’em”

Joni Mitchell

From an article (full version contains spoiler) on Bridge to Terabithia:

“In the book, a girl named Leslie Burke moves in next door to a chore-ridden farm boy, Jess Aarons, and imagines for him a kingdom she names Terabithia. Over a fall and winter, they ride the bus home from school together (sharing a seat in spite of catcalls from schoolmates), dump their backpacks at the edge of the road, and run across an empty field to the edge of a creek bed, where ‘someone long forgotten had hung a rope.’ They use the rope to swing across the gully into Terabithia, a wooded glade that Leslie makes magic….”

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070716-MagicTime.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Art by Wendell Minor from the cover
of Magic Time, by Doug Marlette

From Bridge to Terabithia:

“I know”– she was getting excited– “it could be a magic country like Narnia, and the only way you can get in is by swinging across on this enchanted rope.” Her eyes were bright. She grabbed the rope. “Come on,” she said.

LOS ANGELES – Roger Cardinal Mahony, leader of the Los Angeles Catholic Archdiocese, the nation’s largest, apologized yesterday for what he called a “terrible sin and crime” as the church confirmed it would pay a record $660 million to people sexually abused by priests.

Log24 7/11,
“Magic Time”

Mary Karr,
Facing Altars:
  Poetry and Prayer“–

“There is a body
on the cross  
 in my church.”

“Don’t it always seem to go
that you don’t know
what you’ve got
till it’s gone”

Joni Mitchell

Wednesday, July 11, 2007

Wednesday July 11, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:45 AM
… And One More  
 for the Road

In memory of Doug Marlette,
cartoonist and author
of Magic Time.

Marlette died in a highway
accident yesterday at about
10 AM CT.  He was
"on his way to Oxford
[Mississippi]… to help a
troupe of high school students
put on a play based on
his nationally syndicated
comic strip, Kudzu."

Chris Joyner,
Clarion-Ledger,
Jackson, Mississippi


  Log24 yesterday,
7:59 AM ET:

Mary Karr,
"Facing Altars:
    Poetry and Prayer"–

"There is a body
on the cross  
 in my church."

Church, by Doug Marlette

Kudzu, by Doug Marlette

"I started kneeling to pray morning and night– spitefully at first, in a bitter pout. The truth is, I still fancied the idea that glugging down Jack Daniels would stay my turmoil, but doing so had resulted in my car hurtling into stuff." Mary Karr

Tuesday, July 10, 2007

Tuesday July 10, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:59 AM
Pulp Fiction

“There is a body on the cross in my church. (Which made me think at first that the people worshipped the suffering, till my teenage son told me one day at Mass: ‘What else would get everybody’s attention but something really grisly? It’s like Pulp Fiction.’ In other words, we wouldn’t have it any other way.)” —Mary Karr

Corpus Hypercubus,
by Dali.

Pulp fiction:

“Does the word ‘tesseract’
mean anything to you?”
— Robert A. Heinlein

Friday, March 31, 2006

Friday March 31, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM
Reason and Rhyme

"Philosophers ponder the idea of identity: what it is to give something a name on Monday and have it respond to that name on Friday…."

— Bernard Holland in
   The New York Times
  
Monday, May 20, 1996

Related material:
 
Philadelphia Stories

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051016-Mont.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

and, from Monday,
March 27, 2006–

 A Living Church,

Today's Pennsylvania lottery:

Mid-Day: 888

See today's noon entry
and Eight is a Gate.

Evening: 557

See
 Dogma in the State of Grace,
Is Nothing Sacred?,
 
and, from page 557 of
Webster's
New World Dictionary
,
College Edition, 1960:

"flower"

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06/BirdsBeastsAndFlowers.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Birds, Beasts & Flowers

As performed by
Princess Grace of Monaco

Presented at
St James's Palace, London,

on 22nd November 1978
in the presence of Her Majesty,
Queen Elizabeth
The Queen Mother

Friday March 31, 2006

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Women's History Month continues…
 
Ontology Alignment

"He had with him a small red book of Mao's poems, and as he talked he squared it on the table, aligned it with the table edge first vertically and then horizontally.  To understand who Michael Laski is you must have a feeling for that kind of compulsion."

— Joan Didion in the
Saturday Evening Post,
Nov. 18, 1967 (reprinted in
Slouching Towards Bethlehem)

"Or were you," I said.
He said nothing.
"Raised a Catholic," I said.
He aligned a square crystal paperweight with the edge of his desk blotter.

— Joan Didion in
The Last Thing He Wanted,
Knopf, 1996

"It was Plato who best expressed– who veritably embodied– the tension between the narrative arts and mathematics….

Plato clearly loved them both, both mathematics and poetry.  But he approved of mathematics, and heartily, if conflictedly, disapproved of poetry.  Engraved above the entrance to his Academy, the first European university, was the admonition: Oudeis ageometretos eiseto.  Let none ignorant of geometry enter.  This is an expression of high approval indeed, and the symbolism could not have been more perfect, since mathematics was, for Plato, the very gateway for all future knowledge.  Mathematics ushers one into the realm of abstraction and universality, grasped only through pure reason.  Mathematics is the threshold we cross to pass into the ideal, the truly real."

— Rebecca Goldstein,
Mathematics and
the Character of Tragedy

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