Log24

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Labyrinth 23

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 7:00 PM

The title refers to a search (see below)
suggested by three things—

  1. David Foster Wallace biographer D. T. Max
    "There's a note in one of my files where he says something like,
    'Infinite Jest  was just a means to Mary Karr's end, as it were.' "

  2. "There is a body  on  the cross in my church ." —Mary Karr

  3. A body.

The search Labyrinth 23.

(Within the search results, note particularly the post "The Infinity Point.")

Wednesday, December 26, 2018

Mathematical Labyrinth

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:20 PM

Princeton mathematician Elias Stein died Dec. 23, 2018, at 87.

See as well Stein in posts tagged Narrative Labyrinth.

Saturday, July 2, 2016

From the Labyrinth of Solitude

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:18 PM

Click to enlarge.

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Labyrinth of the Line

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:24 AM

“Yo sé de un laberinto griego que es una línea única, recta.”
—Borges, “La Muerte y la Brújula”

“I know of one Greek labyrinth which is a single straight line.”
—Borges, “Death and the Compass”

Another single-line labyrinth

Robert A. Wilson on the projective line with 24 points
and its image in the Miracle Octad Generator (MOG)—

IMAGE- Robert Wilson on the projective line with 24 points and its image in the MOG

Related material —

The remarks of Scott Carnahan at Math Overflow on October 25th, 2010
and the remarks at Log24 on that same date.

A search in the latter for miracle octad is updated below.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110302-MOGsearch.jpg

This search (here in a customized version) provides some context for the
Benedictine University discussion described here on February 25th and for
the number 759 mentioned rather cryptically in last night’s “Ariadne’s Clue.”

Update of March 3— For some historical background from 1931, see The Mathieu Relativity Problem.

Thursday, April 23, 2009

Thursday April 23, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:24 PM
Star Quality

Eight-pointed star, background image for the E! Online logo

This deliberately cryptic entry is to thank an anonymous reader in Sweden for the following footprint:

Sweden
Speedy
…&uid=37798719 4/23/2009
4:33 PM

“Speedy” is the browser name supplied to the server. The link is to a Columbus Day, 2003, entry with the song phrase “spinnin’ wheel, spinnin’ true.” The time is Eastern Daylight.

Related material:

Vide today’s midday PA lottery number, 177, the 1919 edition of The Oxford Book of English Verse, and the time (interpreted, in a Joycean manner, as a date) of this morning’s first entry.

Happy birthday to Judy Davis
and happy Day of the Book.

Oxford Book of English Verse 1250-1900

Thursday April 23, 2009

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:00 AM

 

The Geometry
of Language

(continued from April 16)

Background:

Professor Arielle Saiber with chess set

Click on the image for an
interview with the author of
Giordano Bruno and
the Geometry of Language
.

Related material:

Joyce on language —

The sigla of 'Finnegans Wake'

Bruno, Joyce, and coincidentia oppositorum

Cullinane on geometry —

Geometry of the I Ching (for comparison to Joyce's 'sigla')

Click on images for details.
 

Thursday April 23, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:22 AM
Theology for Holst

“Timothy J. Holst, who joined the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus as a lowly Keystone Kops clown, rose to the role of singing ringmaster, and ultimately became the show’s talent czar, died April 16 in São Paulo, Brazil, during a visit to sign up circus acts. He was 61.”

Tiene angel.

Timothy J. Holst, who died April 16, 2009
But seriously…. 

Monday, July 23, 2007

Monday July 23, 2007

Daniel Radcliffe
is 18 today.
Daniel Radcliffe as Harry Potter

Greetings.

“The greatest sorcerer (writes Novalis memorably)
would be the one who bewitched himself to the point of
taking his own phantasmagorias for autonomous apparitions.
Would not this be true of us?”

Jorge Luis Borges, “Avatars of the Tortoise”

El mayor hechicero (escribe memorablemente Novalis)
sería el que se hechizara hasta el punto de
tomar sus propias fantasmagorías por apariciones autónomas.
¿No sería este nuestro caso?”

Jorge Luis Borges, “Los Avatares de la Tortuga

Autonomous Apparition

At Midsummer Noon:

“In Many Dimensions (1931)
Williams sets before his reader the
mysterious Stone of King Solomon,
an image he probably drew from
a brief description in Waite’s
The Holy Kabbalah (1929) of
a supernatural cubic stone
on which was inscribed
‘the Divine Name.’”
The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070624-Waite.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Related material:
It is not enough to cover the rock with leaves.
We must be cured of it by a cure of the ground
Or a cure of ourselves, that is equal to a cure 

Of the ground, a cure beyond forgetfulness.
And yet the leaves, if they broke into bud,
If they broke into bloom, if they bore fruit,

And if we ate the incipient colorings
Of their fresh culls might be a cure of the ground.

– Wallace Stevens, “The Rock”

See also
as well as
Hofstadter on
his magnum opus:
“… I realized that to me,
Gödel and Escher and Bach
were only shadows
cast in different directions by
some central solid essence.
I tried to reconstruct
the central object, and
came up with this book.”
Goedel Escher Bach coverHofstadter’s cover.

Here are three patterns,
“shadows” of a sort,
derived from a different
“central object”:
Faces of Solomon's Cube, related to Escher's 'Verbum'

Click on image for details.

Monday July 23, 2007

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:59 AM
 
Today’s Birthday:
Daniel Radcliffe
(“Harry Potter”)

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone DVD

Theme

(Plato, Meno)

Plato's Diamond colored

and Variations:

Diamond Theory cover, 1976
Click on picture for details.

“A diamond jubilance
beyond the fire,
That gives its power
to the wild-ringed eye”

— Wallace Stevens,
“The Owl in the Sarcophagus”

Monday, May 15, 2017

For Penelope Reed Doob…

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:40 PM

who reportedly died on March 11 —

Posts now tagged Labyrinth for Penelope.

See also the previous post and this journal on the above date.

Friday, April 28, 2017

As In :: A Sin

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:09 PM

For the Church of Simultaneous Devices

Related art —

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Back to the Past

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:35 PM

"Old men ought to be explorers" — T. S. Eliot

"All on a Saturday night" — Johnny Thunder, 1962

'Loop De Loop,' Johnny Thunder, Diamond Records, 1962

Update of 8:25 PM ET on March 18 —

"Analysis." — Dr. Robert Ford in "Westworld"

"Master theorist and conceptual genius."

— Jon Pareles, front page, online New York Times   tonight

News Search

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:30 PM

See also, in this journal, "Before the Devil Knows You're Dead."

Gamers

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

A search for Gamers in this journal yields

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/061019-Tombstones.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

This is not unrelated to the title of a 2008 
book by Jeremy Gray:

Plato's Ghost:
The Modernist Transformation
of Mathematics
.

Friday, March 17, 2017

To Coin a Phrase

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:26 PM

(A sequel to the previous post, Narrative for Westworld)

"That corpse you planted last year . . . ." — T. S.  Eliot

Circle and Square at the Court of King Minos

Harmonic analysis based on the circle involves the
circular  functions.  Dyadic  harmonic analysis involves

For some related history, see (for instance) E. M. Stein
on square functions in a 1982 AMS Bulletin  article.

Narrative for Westworld

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:12 PM

“That corpse you planted
          last year in your garden,
  Has it begun to sprout?
          Will it bloom this year?  
  Or has the sudden frost
          disturbed its bed?”

— T. S. Eliot, “The Waste Land

Coxeter exhuming Geometry

Ball and Coxeter, 'Mathematical Recreations,' Twelfth Edition

Click the book for a video.

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Middle March:

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:02 PM

The Key to All Mythologies  in a Cartoon Graveyard

This is a sequel to yesterday's post Review, which
suggested a look at Lévi-Strauss's The Raw and The Cooked  
in Derrida's “Structure, Sign, and Play," and then a look at the

Financial Times  of February 26, 2010

"The metaphor for metamorphosis no keys unlock."

Steven H. Cullinane, November 7, 1986

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Review

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

In Adam’s Fall / We Sinnèd All

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:18 AM

Backstory for Westworld —

"Don't want to end up a cartoon in a cartoon graveyard."

Backstories

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

"Backstories do more than amuse guests.
They anchor the hosts.
It's their cornerstone.
The rest of their identity is built around it, layer by layer."

— Elsie Hughes in "Westworld," Season 1, Episode 3,
     "The Stray," at 30:09

See also cornerstone in the Bible.

Dr. Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) earlier in that same episode —

Westworld S1E3 23:15- Dr. Ford on fiction

Saturday, March 11, 2017

Atque Vale

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:28 PM

Jeremy Irons and the Apple of Eden —

Jeremy Gray, Valediction —

See also this journal on Thursday, 11 September, 2014.

Saturday, July 2, 2016

Mnemonic

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:24 PM
 

"…  Seven is Heaven,  Eight is a Gate  …"

 

But Seriously …

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:26 PM

British film director Robin Hardy reportedly
died yesterday.  In his memory —

Hardy's film "The Wicker Tree" reportedly opened in the USA on
January 27, 2012. See also narratives in this journal on that date.

Not Even

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:29 AM

"At CERN the LHC has reached design luminosity,
and is breaking records with a fast pace of new
collisions. This may have something to do with the
report that the LHC is also about to tear open
a portal to another dimension
."

— Peter Woit, Thursday, June 30, 2016,
    at 1:01 PM ET 

See as well The Onion  yesterday (Friday, July 1) —

Investigators: First 48 Hours Most Critical
In Locating Missing Children Who Entered
Portal To Fantastical World

Frozen Narrative

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:45 AM

A book by Northrop Frye pictured in the previous post
suggests a Log24 search for "The Great Code."

That search yields

See as well Ice 9 and Plan 9.

"Icy white and crystalline"
— Johnny Mercer

Saturday, May 14, 2016

The Hourglass Code

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:28 PM

version of the I Ching’s Hexagram 19:

I Ching Hexagram 19, 'Approach,' the box-style version

From Katherine Neville's The Eight , a book on the significance
of the date April 4 — the author's birthday —

Axe image from Katherine Neville's 'The Eight'

The Eight  by Katherine Neville —

    “What does this have to do with why we’re here?”
    “I saw it in a chess book Mordecai showed me.  The most ancient chess service ever discovered was found at the palace of King Minos on Crete– the place where the famous Labyrinth was built, named after this sacred axe.  The chess service dates to 2000 B.C.  It was made of gold and silver and jewels…. And in the center was carved a labrys.”
… “But I thought chess wasn’t even invented until six or seven hundred A.D.,” I added.  “They always say it came from Persia or India.  How could this Minoan chess service be so old?”
    “Mordecai’s written a lot himself on the history of chess,” said Lily…. “He thinks that chess set in Crete was designed by the same guy who built the Labyrinth– the sculptor Daedalus….”
    Now things were beginning to click into place….
    “Why was this axe carved on the chessboard?” I asked Lily, knowing the answer in my heart before she spoke.  “What did Mordecai say was the connection?”….
    “That’s what it’s all about,” she said quietly.  “To kill the King.”
 
     The sacred axe was used to kill the King.  The ritual had been the same since the beginning of time. The game of chess was merely a reenactment.  Why hadn’t I recognized it before?

Related material:  Posts now tagged Hourglass Code.

See also the hourglass in a search for Pilgrim's Progress Illustration.

Sunday, November 23, 2014

Remarks on Reality

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:09 PM

Wallace Stevens in "An Ordinary Evening in New Haven"
(1950) on "The Ruler of Reality" —

"Again, 'He has thought it out, he thinks it out,
As he has been and is and, with the Queen
Of Fact, lies at his ease beside the sea.'"

One such scene, from 1953 —

Another perspective, from "The Osterman Weekend" (1983) —

Style

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:00 AM

Corrections to the NY Times  obituary of Alexander Grothendieck
are shown below. For the original Sunday, Nov. 16, NY Times 
print obituary (with its online date, Nov. 14), see a copy taken
from a weblog.

Stevens on 'the Ruler of Reality'

For another poetic remark in memory of Grothendieck,
see a Log24 post from November 13, the day of his death.

Saturday, August 24, 2013

Being’s Road

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:16 PM

For the late Julie Harris —

By slow and carefully modulated steps Bradford's narrative
has brought his community of separatists to the place he
calls Cape Harbor… where, face-to-face with the bleak
and wintry reduction that is his image for American space,
he finds himself stopped, able to do nothing but come to
an astonished pause. The final step, that of imaginative
crossing into the land that lies before them, remains
beyond the power of narrative to take. Narrative falters, and
finding his journey advanced to an "odd Fork in Being's Road"
and himself nothing so much as an "empty spirit / In vacant
space" (to adopt apt phrases from Dickinson and Stevens…),
Bradford requires the sublime if he is to continue moving
forward: separation becomes exaltation as it becomes
manifest that only an influx 
of "the Spirit of God and His
grace" can have permitted the community to survive its
passage to the limit depicted.

— David Laurence, "William Bradford's American Sublime,"
PMLA , Vol. 102, No. 1, 1987, pp. 55-65

Cast (continued)

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:31 AM

The death yesterday of British cinematographer
Gilbert Taylor suggests an image from last evening's
Log24 search Point Omega —

.

The die in the above image (shown here Dec. 28, 2012
displays the numbers 3-6-5 in counterclockwise order.
A similar die in an earlier post served as a metaphor for
a time-jump to 365 days in the past.

For some religious remarks by Umberto Eco that may
serve as a small memorial to Taylor, see this journal 
a year before  the day he died— August 23, 2012.

"Everybody comes to Rick's."

Friday, August 23, 2013

Vacant Space

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

A passage from Wallace Stevens

The spirit and space,
The empty spirit 
In vacant space.

A frame from the film American Psycho  (2000), starring Christian Bale—

IMAGE- 'espace' sign from the film 'American Psycho'

The rest of the film is not recommended.

Related material—

"24 Hour Psycho" at the Museum of Modern Art in the novel Point Omega .

Illustration from a New York Times  review

IMAGE- NY Times headline 'A Wrinkle in Time' with 24 Hour Psycho and Point Omega scene

Ten Years of Nothing

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:02 PM

For insatiable actor Patrick Bateman (protagonist of
American Psycho) and anti-theologian Kirk Varnedoe
Pictures of Nothing, this journal ten years ago today )

Philip Rieff, The Crisis of the Officer Class,
University of Virginia Press, 2007

From page 73:

The third culture's life-style, its way, is no way: it is abandonment, 
an ethos of empty seriousness best expressed, I think, by the 
greatest of American poets in the tradition that began with 
Emerson. Wallace Stevens was the greatest American maker of 
that "fictive music" of the "unreal" by which poets "give back to us 
what you [God] gave," Creation itself, now understood, in the third
culture, as the "imagination that we spurned and crave." Stevens
understood the fictive music of faith, that intensity which

proclaims
The near, the clear …
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
… an image that is sure,
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Yet not too like, yet not so like to be
Too near, too clear, saving a little to endow
Our feigning with the strange unlike…. [12]

This is masterly anti-theology. This is what no "mickey mockers" of 
the spirit can ever become: the "American sublime," the mar-

[12] Wallace Stevens, "To the One of Fictive Music," in Collected 
Poems
 (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1954), 87-88; all citations of 
Stevens are to this edition.

From page 74:

velous panic and emptiness of belief by which the "sublime comes 
down/To the spirit itself" and terrifies the American self:

The spirit and space,
The empty spirit 
In vacant space.
What wine does one drink?
What bread does one eat? [13]

This poet is no great character, nor temple priest. He is a virtuoso 
chef, preparing the food for the American feast of unbeliefs. This 
supreme fictionist invents bread and wine, anything that will act as 
that "act of the mind." [14] Stevens had a shrewd Emersonian idea 
of myth, or Freudian, the "sexual myth" or any other "images of 
metaphors." [15] He knew that it was in "this invented world" that "the 
death of one god is the death of all." This is the most supreme of all 
fictions, by which "He imposes orders as he thinks of them." [16]

[13] Stevens, "The American Sublime," 130-31
[14] Stevens, "Of Modern Poetry," 239-40; modern poetry, which is 
"the finding of a satisfaction," or a script for a theater– whatever 
"will suffice" for the "insatiable actor" of the third culture, even the 
script of "cuisine bourgeoise," where we may "feast on human 
heads" (240, 227).
[15] Stevens, "Men Made out of Words," 355; and "Thinking of a 
Relation between the Images of Metaphors," 356-57.
[16] Stevens, "Notes toward a Supreme Fiction," 380-81, 403.

Saturday, November 24, 2012

Reappearing All Over Again

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:02 PM

For the title, see the phrase "reappearing number" in this journal.

Some related mathematics—

the Greek labyrinth of Borges, as well as…

IMAGE- Robert Wilson on the projective line with 24 points and its image in the MOG.

Note that "0" here stands for "23," while corresponds to today's date.

Friday, March 16, 2012

For the Clueless

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:11 AM

"And she provided him besides with a ball of thread,
bidding him to fasten the end of it to the entrance
of the Labyrinth, and unwind it as he went in, that
it might serve him as a clue to find his way out again."

— "Theseus and Ariadne," by Charles Morris

From "Ariadne's Clue," a post of March 1 last year—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110301-DeathlyHallows759.jpg

The Watson here is not Emma, but Victor—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix12/120316-Watson7detail.jpg

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

The Infinity Point

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:20 PM

From Labyrinth of the Line (March 2, 2011)—

"… construct the Golay code by taking the 24 points
to be the points of the projective line F23 ∪ {}…."

— Robert A. Wilson

A simpler projective line— a Galois geometry
model of the line F2 ∪ {}—

Image- The Three-Point Line: A Finite Projective Geometry

Here we may consider  to be modeled*
by the third square above— the Galois window .

* Update of about 1 AM Jan. 25, 2012—
  This infinity-modeling is of course a poetic conceit,
  not to be taken too seriously. For a serious 
  discussion of points at infinity and finite fields,
  see (for instance) Daniel Bump's "The Group GL(2)."

Friday, January 20, 2012

Cock Tale

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:00 PM

(Continued from November 12, 2005 and June 7, 2011)

IMAGE- 1970 photo used in New Yorker of Jan. 23, 2012, with added photo credit information from a Philippe Sollers website

Related material— "Labyrinth," a fiction
by the late Roberto Bolaño
in the current New Yorker 

"There's no photo credit."

Friday, March 11, 2011

Now Lens

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:00 AM

A Story in Pictures

Errol Morris in The New York Times  on March 9

"If everything is incommensurable, then everything is seen through the lens of the present, the lens of now ."

"Borges concluded by quoting Chesterton, 'there is nothing more frightening than a labyrinth that has no center.' [72]"

Now Lens

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110311-NowLens.jpg

Uncertified Copy

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110311-UncertifiedCopy.jpg

Del Toro

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110311-delToro.jpg

Plato's Diamond

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110311-LychePlatosDiamond256w.jpg

Portrait of an Artist

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110311-JosefineLyche.jpg

Meanwhile, back at the Times

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110311-CertifiedCopy.jpg

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Tale

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 8:00 PM

A reviewer says Steve Martin finds in his new novel An Object of Beauty  "a sardonic morality tale."

From this journal on the day The Cube  was published (see today's Art Object ) —

Monday February 20, 2006

m759 @ 12:00 AM

The Past Revisited

From Log24 a year ago on this date, a quote from Many Dimensions  (1931), by Charles Williams:

“Lord Arglay had a suspicion that the Stone would be purely logical.  Yes, he thought, but what, in that sense, were the rules of its pure logic?”

For the rest of the story, see the downloadable version at Project Gutenberg of Australia.

See also a post on Mathematics and Narrative from Nov. 14, 2009.

That post compares characters in Many Dimensions  to those in Logicomix

Whitehead and Russell, 'Logicomix' page 181

Art Object

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

There is more than one way
to look at a cube.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101123-plain_cube_200x227.gif

 From Cambridge U. Press on Feb. 20, 2006 —

IMAGE- 'Cambridge Tracts in Mathematics 168: The Cube'

and from this journal on June 30, 2010 —

In memory of Wu Guanzhong, Chinese artist
who died in Beijing on June 25, 2010

Image-- The Dream of the Expanded Field

See also this journal on Feb. 20, 2006
(the day The Cube  was published).

Back to the Saddle

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 5:30 AM

Recent posts (Church Logic and Church Narrative) have discussed finite  geometry as a type of non-Euclidean geometry.

For those who prefer non-finite geometry, here are some observations.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101123-CoxeterPilate.jpg

"A characteristic property of hyperbolic geometry
is that the angles of a triangle add to less
than a straight angle (half circle)." — Wikipedia

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101123-Saddle.jpg

From To Ride Pegasus, by Anne McCaffrey, 1973: 

“Mary-Molly luv, it’s going to be accomplished in steps, this establishment of the Talented in the scheme of things. Not society, mind you, for we’re the original nonconformists…. and Society will never permit us to integrate.  That’s okay!”  He consigned Society to insignificance with a flick of his fingers.  “The Talented form their own society and that’s as it should be: birds of a feather.  No, not birds.  Winged horses!  Ha!  Yes, indeed. Pegasus… the poetic winged horse of flights of fancy.  A bloody good symbol for us.  You’d see a lot from the back of a winged horse…”

“Yes, an airplane has blind spots.  Where would you put a saddle?”  Molly had her practical side.

On the practical side:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101123-CandelaSpire.jpg

The above chapel is from a Princeton Weekly Bulletin  story of October 6th, 2008.

Related material: This journal on that date.

Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Plato’s Ghost

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:07 AM

Jeremy Gray, Plato's Ghost: The Modernist Transformation of Mathematics, Princeton, 2008–

"Here, modernism is defined as an autonomous body of ideas, having little or no outward reference, placing considerable emphasis on formal aspects of the work and maintaining a complicated— indeed, anxious— rather than a naïve relationship with the day-to-day world, which is the de facto view of a coherent group of people, such as a professional or discipline-based group that has a high sense of the seriousness and value of what it is trying to achieve. This brisk definition…."

Brisk? Consider Caesar's "The die is cast," Gray in "Solomon's Cube," and yesterday's post

Group of 8 cube-face permutations generated by reflections in midplanes parallel to faces

This is the group of "8 rigid motions
generated by reflections in midplanes"
of Solomon's Cube.

Related material:

"… the action of G168 in its alternative guise as SL(3; Z/2Z) is also now apparent. This version of G168 was presented by Weber in [1896, p. 539],* where he attributed it to Kronecker."

— Jeremy Gray, "From the History of a Simple Group," in The Eightfold Way, MSRI Publications, 1998

Here MSRI, an acronym for Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, is pronounced "Misery." See Stephen King, K.C. Cole, and Heinrich Weber.

*H. Weber, Lehrbuch der Algebra, Vieweg, Braunschweig, 1896. Reprinted by Chelsea, New York, 1961.

Friday, December 4, 2009

And continued…

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Glory Road postgraduate curriculum–

"Learning has always been a major part of Catholic tradition."

Related material:

The Labyrinth of Solitude
entry in this journal,
The Harvard Crimson on the
Harvard FML Video Contest,
and the winning video

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09A/091204-HUTV.jpg

Another view of Harvard–

St. Paul's RC Church and the Harvard Lampoon building, photo from MSPdude at Flickr

Photo from MSPdude at Flickr

"Let Noon Be Fair."
— Novel title, Willard Motley.

See also Soul at Harvard.

Tuesday, May 27, 2008

Tuesday May 27, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:02 PM
For Sydney Pollack
(See last night’s entry.)

“Now, gentlemen,
I give you
our latest acquisition
from the enemy.”

Paths of Glory   

Final scene from 'Paths of Glory'

Note the number, 701,
on the colonel’s collar.

Adapted from Log24,
February 19-22, 2008:

“‘This is the last call for Jaunt-701,’
 the pleasant female voice echoed
 through the Blue Concourse
of 
New York’s
     Port Authority Terminal….

Images of time and eternity in memory of Michelangelo
See 2/22/08,
 4/19/08,
and 5/22/08.

….’What happened?’
one of the scientists shouted….

‘It’s eternity in there,’ he said,
and dropped dead….”


— Stephen King, “The Jaunt

Die Liebe nahm kein Ende mehr.

Thursday, May 22, 2008

Thursday May 22, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM
The Undertaking:
An Exercise in
Conceptual Art

I Ching hexagram 54: The Marrying Maiden

Hexagram 54:
THE JUDGMENT

Undertakings bring misfortune.
Nothing that would further.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix08/080522-Irelandslide1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Brian O’Doherty, an Irish-born artist,
before the [Tuesday, May 20] wake
of his alter ego* ‘Patrick Ireland’
on the grounds of the
Irish Museum of Modern Art.”
New York Times, May 22, 2008    

THE IMAGE

Thus the superior man
understands the transitory
in the light of
the eternity of the end.

Another version of
the image:

Images of time and eternity in memory of Michelangelo
See 2/22/08
and  4/19/08.


Related material:

Michael Kimmelman in today’s New York Times

“An essay from the ’70s by Mr. O’Doherty, ‘Inside the White Cube,’ became famous in art circles for describing how modern art interacted with the gallery spaces in which it was shown.”

Brian O’Doherty, “Inside the White Cube,” 1976 Artforum essays on the gallery space and 20th-century art:

“The history of modernism is intimately framed by that space. Or rather the history of modern art can be correlated with changes in that space and in the way we see it. We have now reached a point where we see not the art but the space first…. An image comes to mind of a white, ideal space that, more than any single picture, may be the archetypal image of 20th-century art.”

An archetypal image

THE SPACE:

The Eightfold Cube: The Beauty of Klein's Simple Group

A non-archetypal image

THE ART:

Jack in the Box, by Natasha Wescoat

Natasha Wescoat, 2004
See also Epiphany 2008:

How the eightfold cube works

“Nothing that would further.”
— Hexagram 54

Lear’s fool:

 …. Now thou art an 0
without a figure. I am better
than thou art, now. I am a fool;
thou art nothing….

“…. in the last mystery of all the single figure of what is called the World goes joyously dancing in a state beyond moon and sun, and the number of the Trumps is done.  Save only for that which has no number and is called the Fool, because mankind finds it folly till it is known.  It is sovereign or it is nothing, and if it is nothing then man was born dead.”

The Greater Trumps,
by Charles Williams, Ch. 14

* For a different, Jungian, alter ego, see Irish Fourplay (Jan. 31, 2003) and “Outside the Box,” a New York Times review of O’Doherty’s art (featuring a St. Bridget’s Cross) by Bridget L. Goodbody dated April 25, 2007. See also Log24 on that date.

Sunday, February 24, 2008

Sunday February 24, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM
Labyrinth of Solitude

http://www.log24.com/log/pix08/080224-Chapel.jpg

Chapel, Cuernavaca, Mexico

“A labyrinthine man never seeks
the truth, but always, only, his Ariadne….
Who besides myself knows what Ariadne is?”

Nietzsche,
epigraph to Ariadne’s Lives,
by Nina daVinci Nichols
(See yesterday’s entry.)

Related material:

Entries of Feb. 13
and Feb. 19 at Log24
and the entry of Feb. 13 at

Ariachne’s Broken Woof

Troilus and Cressida in Act 5, Scene 2:

“And yet the spacious breadth of this division
Admits no orifex for a point as subtle
As Ariachne’s broken woof to enter.
Instance, O instance! strong as Pluto’s gates;
Cressid is mine, tied with the bonds of heaven:
Instance, O instance! strong as heaven itself;
The bonds of heaven are slipp’d, dissolved, and loosed….”

See also Slipstream: “We’ve lost the plot!

Friday, February 8, 2008

Friday February 8, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:06 AM

Prizes and Rewards

"… like the victors in the games   
collecting their prizes,
    we receive our reward…."
— Conclusion of
Plato's Republic

From The Harvard Crimson
front page on
Mardi Gras, 2008:

Harvard senior Matthew Di Pasquale
plans a new campus magazine called
"Diamond"–

New magazine 'Diamond' planned at Harvard
Click to enlarge
.

Related material:

The Crimson Passion:
 Drama at Mardi Gras

Friday, April 20, 2007

Friday April 20, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:31 PM
Speech

In Grand Rapids today

"… Bush spoke and answered audience questions for nearly 90 minutes inside East Grand Rapids High School in suburban Grand Rapids….

After leaving the school, Bush's motorcade stopped at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum in downtown Grand Rapids, where he stood silently for a few moments after placing a bouquet of white roses at Ford's burial site on the museum grounds. The 38th president, who grew up in Grand Rapids, died Dec. 26 at age 93."

Multispeech

Mich. Lottery Apr. 20, 2007: Day 019, Night 001

 

For the meaning of the lottery icons
above, see this morning's entry and
an entry that it links to —
Time's Labyrinth continued
of March 8, 2007.

For the meaning of multispeech,
see the entries of
All Hallows' Eve, 2005:

Tesseract on the cover of The Gameplayers of Zan
 
"There is such a thing
as a tesseract."
A Wrinkle in Time 
 

Friday April 20, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:07 AM
Icons

Part I

The Library of Congress
Today in History, April 20:

“American sculptor Daniel Chester French was born in Exeter, New Hampshire on April 20, 1850. His colossal seated figure of Abraham Lincoln presides over the Lincoln Memorial.

Reared in Cambridge and Concord, Massachusetts, he was embraced by members of the Transcendentalist community including Ralph Waldo Emerson. Author and fellow Concord resident Louisa May Alcott encouraged young French to pursue a career as an artist. Louisa’s sister, artist May Alcott, was his early teacher.

French studied in Boston and New York prior to receiving his first commission for the 1875 statue The Minute Man. Standing near the North Bridge in Concord, in the Minute Man National Historical Park, this work commemorates events at the North Bridge, the site of ‘the shot heard ’round the world.’ An American icon, images derivative of The Minute Man statue appeared on defense bonds, stamps, and posters during World War II.”

Part II:

Entertainment Weekly,

November 7, 2003

Keanu Reeves, Entertainment Weekly, Nov. 7, 2003

Part III:

Log24 on the anniversary of
Lincoln’s assassination —

Saturday, April 14, 2007  4:30 AM

The Sun Also Sets, or…

This Way to
the Egress

Continued from April 12:

“I have only come here 
seeking knowledge,
 Things they would not   
       teach me of in college….”
 
— Synchronicity
lyrics

Quoted in Log24,
Time’s Labyrinth continued:

“The sacred axe was used to kill the King. The ritual had been the same since the beginning of time. The game of chess was merely a reenactment. Why hadn’t I recognized it before?”

— Katherine Neville,
The Eight,

Ballantine reprint, 1990,


“Know the one about
the Demiurge and the
Abridgment of Hope?”

— Robert Stone,
A Flag for Sunrise,
Knopf, 1981,
the final page

Part IV:

Log24 entry of

November 7, 2003

Nixon's the One button

— and a
student play from
Virginia Tech:

Play by Virginia Tech student

Part V:


Symmetry
for Beavis and Butt-Head

and
The Rhetoric of Scientism:

It’s a very ancient saying,
But a true and honest thought,
That if you become a teacher,
By your pupils you’ll be taught.

— Oscar Hammerstein,
“Getting to Know You”

Thursday, March 8, 2007

Thursday March 8, 2007

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 AM
Dia de la
Mujer Trabajadora

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070308-Aldecoa.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

“Yo es que nací un 8 de marzo,
Día de la Mujer Trabajadora,
y no he hecho más que
trabajar toda mi vida.”

Josefina Aldecoa

For background on Aldecoa,
see a paper (pdf) by
Sara Brenneis:

“Josefina Aldecoa intertwines
history, collective memory
and individual testimony in her
historical memory trilogy…”

HISTORICAL MEMORY–

History:

The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire in New York City on March 25, 1911, was the largest industrial disaster in the history of the city of New York, causing the death of 146 garment workers who either died in the fire or jumped to their deaths.

Propaganda, March 1977:

“On March 8, 1908, after the death of 128 women trapped in a fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in New York City, 15,000 women workers from the garment and textile industry marched echoing the demands of their sisters 50 years earlier…”

Propaganda, March 2006:

“First of all, on March 8th, 1857, a large number of factory workers in the United States took to the streets to demand their economic and political rights. The owners called the police who arrived immediately and opened fire, engaging in blind repression… Later on, in 1908, the same date of March 8th was once again a memorable date of struggle. On this day, capitalist bosses in Chicago set fire to a textile factory where over a thousand women worked. A very large number was terribly burnt. 120 died!”

Propaganda disguised as news, March 2007:

From today’s top story in 24 HoursTM, a commuter daily in Vancouver published by Sun Media Corporation:

Fight still on for equality

By Robyn Stubbs and Carly Krug

“International Women’s Day commemorates a march by female garment workers protesting low wages, 12-hour workdays and bad working conditions in New York City on March 8, 1857.

Then in 1908, after 128 women were trapped and killed in a fire at a New York City garment and textile factory, 15,000 women workers again took their protests to the street.”

Related historical fiction:

A version of the
I Ching’s Hexagram 19:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051202-Hex19.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Log24 12/3/05:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051202-Axe.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Katherine Neville, The Eight

    “What does this have to do with why we’re here?”
    “I saw it in a chess book Mordecai showed me.  The most ancient chess service ever discovered was found at the palace of King Minos on Crete– the place where the famous Labyrinth was built, named after this sacred axe.  The chess service dates to 2000 B.C.  It was made of gold and silver and jewels…. And in the center was carved a labrys.”
… “But I thought chess wasn’t even invented until six or seven hundred A.D.,” I added.  “They always say it came from Persia or India.  How could this Minoan chess service be so old?”
    “Mordecai’s written a lot himself on the history of chess,” said Lily…. “He thinks that chess set in Crete was designed by the same guy who built the Labyrinth– the sculptor Daedalus….”
    Now things were beginning to click into place….
    “Why was this axe carved on the chessboard?” I asked Lily, knowing the answer in my heart before she spoke.  “What did Mordecai say was the connection?”….
    “That’s what it’s all about,” she said quietly.  “To kill the King.”
 
     The sacred axe was used to kill the King.  The ritual had been the same since the beginning of time. The game of chess was merely a reenactment.  Why hadn’t I recognized it before?

Perhaps at the center of
Aldecoa’s labyrinth lurk the
  capitalist bosses from Chicago
who, some say, set fire
to a textile factory
on this date in 1908.

For a Freudian perspective
on the above passage,
see yesterday’s entry
In the Labyrinth of Time,
with its link to
John Irwin‘s essay

The False Artaxerxes:
Borges and the
Dream of Chess
.”

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070307-Symbols.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Symbols
S. H. Cullinane
March 7, 2007

Today, by the way, is the
feast of a chess saint.

Wednesday, March 7, 2007

Wednesday March 7, 2007

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 8:24 AM
In the Labyrinth
of Time:


8:24:48
AM EST


Related material–


Symbols:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070307-Symbols.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

and

The False Artaxerxes:
Borges and the
Dream of Chess

This entry was inspired by
Xanga footprints yesterday
from Virginia:

 
1. Virginia
Weblog
ART WARS:
Time and the Grid
3/6/2007
9:48 AM
2. Virginia
Weblog
Sequel
3/6/2007
11:38 AM
3. Virginia
Weblog
Games and Truth
3/6/2007
1:25 PM
4. Virginia
/item.aspx?user=m759&ta…
The Transcendent Signified
3/6/2007
5:15 PM
5. Virginia
/item.aspx?user=m759&ta…
Zen and Language Games
3/6/2007
5:16 PM
6. Virginia
/item.aspx?user=m759&ta…
Balanchine’s Birthday
3/6/2007
6:12 PM
7. Virginia
/item.aspx?user=m759&ta…
The Agony and the Ya-Ya
3/6/2007
6:12 PM
8. Virginia
/item.aspx?user=m759&ta…
Directions Out
3/6/2007
6:13 PM
9. Virginia
/item.aspx?user=m759&ta…
The Four Last Things
3/6/2007
6:13 PM

Wednesday, January 3, 2007

Wednesday January 3, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:32 AM
The Wanderer:
 
11:32:56

“What on earth is
a concrete universal?”
Robert M. Pirsig  

Hexagram 56

“James Joyce meant Finnegans Wake to become a universal book. His universe was primarily Dublin, but Joyce believed that the universal can be found in the particular. ‘I always write about Dublin,’ he said to Arthur Power, ‘because if I can get to the heart of Dublin I can get to the heart of all the cities of the world’ (Ellmann 505). He achieved that goal in Ulysses by making Bloom a universal wanderer, the everyman trying to find his way in the labyrinth of the world.” —The Joyce of Science

Related material:

From A Shot at Redemption

The Past as Prologue:
Grand Rapids Revisited

Constantine (cartoon) and Donald Knuth

John Constantine,
cartoon character, and
Donald E. Knuth,
Lutheran mathematician

“…. recent books testify
further to Calvin College’s
unparalleled leadership
in the field of
Christian historiography….”

“I need a photo opportunity,
I want a shot at redemption.
Don’t want to end up a cartoon
In a cartoon graveyard.”

A photo opportunity —

Photo op for Gerald Ford

and a recent cartoon:

Cartoon of Gerald Ford with halo

History, said Stephen….

From Calvin College,
today’s meditation:

Monday, May 22, 2006

Monday May 22, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:04 AM
A Labyrinth
for Penelope

Wednesday, December 7, 2005

Wednesday December 7, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:00 PM
Magical Thinking
 
(continued)

1:00:19 EST

The Lion, the Witch
and the Wardrobe

premieres tonight at
 the Royal Albert Hall.

Log24 Dec. 2:

Hexagram 19 in the
Cullinane series:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051202-Hex19.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Log24 Dec. 3:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051202-Axe.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Katherine Neville, The Eight

    “What does this have to do with why we’re here?”
    “I saw it in a chess book Mordecai showed me.  The most ancient chess service ever discovered was found at the palace of King Minos on Crete– the place where the famous Labyrinth was built, named after this sacred axe.  The chess service dates to 2000 B.C.  It was made of gold and silver and jewels…. And in the center was carved a labrys.”
… “But I thought chess wasn’t even invented until six or seven hundred A.D.,” I added.  “They always say it came from Persia or India.  How could this Minoan chess service be so old?”
    “Mordecai’s written a lot himself on the history of chess,” said Lily…. “He thinks that chess set in Crete was designed by the same guy who built the Labyrinth– the sculptor Daedalus….”
    Now things were beginning to click into place….
    “Why was this axe carved on the chessboard?” I asked Lily, knowing the answer in my heart before she spoke.  “What did Mordecai say was the connection?”….
    “That’s what it’s all about,” she said quietly.  “To kill the King.”
 
     The sacred axe was used to kill the King.  The ritual had been the same since the beginning of time. The game of chess was merely a reenactment.  Why hadn’t I recognized it before?


“But what does it all mean?” asked Susan when they were somewhat calmer.

“It means,” said Aslan, “that though the Witch knew the Deep Magic, there is a magic deeper still which she did not know. Her knowledge goes back only to the dawn of Time. But if she could have looked a little further back, into the stillness and the darkness before Time dawned, she would have read there a different incantation. She would have known that when a willing victim who had committed no treachery was killed in a traitor’s stead, the Table would crack and Death itself would start working backward.”

 

Sunday, May 22, 2005

Sunday May 22, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:09 PM

The Diamond in the Labyrinth

From the labyrinth of Solitude:

  1. An Invariant Feast
  2. Columbia News obituary of Robert D. Cumming
  3. Solitude

    (Phenomenology and Deconstruction, Vol 4
    by Robert Denoon Cumming)

    On page 13 of Solitude —

    From Heidegger’s “Letter on Humanism” —
    “… so long as philosophy merely busies itself with continually obstructing the possibility of admission to the subject of thinking– that is, the truth of being– it escapes the danger of ever being broken against the hardness of that subject.  Thus ‘philosophizing’ about the shattering is separated by an abyss from a thinking that is shattered.”

    This suggests a search for
    “Heidegger” + “diamond,” which yields —

  4. The Diamond at the End of Time,
    which leads to
  5. Orson Welles Interviews Jilly Dybka,
    which leads to
  6. Poetry Hut Blog,
    which leads to

  7. Fair Territory, by Jilly Dybka,
    which contains the following —
  8. The Quickening

    I hold my breath, the plane’s
       wheels under me
    still suspended in the minutes after
    takeoff, when the planet’s brute gravity
    statistically can cause a disaster.
    We are flying low enough that I scan
    civilization in miniature.
    Blue pill swimming pools, and
       roadways that fan
    out like ribbons in the wind. On the sure
    crust, too, a baseball diamond.
       Young boys race
    across the tilted surface, mute and small,
    kicking up red dust. First base, Second base,
    Third Base, Home. We ascend into nightfall
    and beneath the broken stars one kid bunts.
    I remember I was a rookie once.

  9. From yesterday’s online New York Times:

    The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050521-ConeyIslandCrash.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Nine is a Vine.

Sunday May 22, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:25 PM
The Shining
of Friday the 13th

From Margalit Fox in today’s New York Times:

“Eddie Barclay, who for three decades after World War II was arguably the most powerful music mogul in Europe and inarguably the most flamboyant, died on [Friday] May 13 in Paris. He was 84….

… Mr. Barclay was best known for three things: popularizing American jazz in France in the postwar years; keeping the traditional French chanson alive into the age of rock ‘n’ roll; and presiding over parties so lavish that they were considered just the tiniest bit excessive even by the standards of the French Riviera….

Among the guests at some of his glittering parties… Jack Nicholson….”

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050522-Jack.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Related material:

“Joyce’s confidant in Zurich in 1918, Frank Budgen, luckily for us described the process of writing Ulysses…. ‘Not Bloom, not Stephen is here the principal personage, but Dublin itself… All towns are labyrinths…’  While working… Joyce bought a game called Labyrinth, which he played every evening for a time with his daughter, Lucia. From this game he cataloged the six main errors of judgment into which one might fall in seeking a way out of a maze.”

quoted by Bruce Graham from The Creators by Daniel Boorstin

“We’ll always have Paris.”

An Invariant Feast, Log24, Sept. 6, 2004

Thursday, April 7, 2005

Thursday April 7, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM
Nine is a Vine

“Heaven is a state,
a sort of metaphysical state.”
— John O’Hara, Hope of Heaven, 1938

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/HopeOfHeaven1938.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

 “Mathematical realism holds that mathematical entities exist independently of the human mind.  Thus humans do not invent mathematics, but rather discover it, and any other intelligent beings in the universe would presumably do the same. The term Platonism is used because such a view is seen to parallel Plato’s belief in a “heaven of ideas”, an unchanging ultimate reality that the everyday world can only imperfectly approximate. Plato’s view probably derives from Pythagoras, and his followers the Pythagoreans, who believed that the world was, quite literally, built up by the numbers. This idea may have even older origins that are unknown to us.” — Wikipedia

Amen.

Related material:

In memory of Jesus of Nazareth,
the “true vine,”
who, some historians believe,
died on this date:

The Crucifixion of John O’Hara.

In memory of the Anti-Vine:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/DayOfTheLocust.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

See Dogma and
Heaven, Hell,
and Hollywood.
 
Related material:

The Usual Suspects

and

Thursday, December 26, 2002:

Holly for Miss Quinn 

Tonight’s site music is for Stephen Dedalus
and Miss Quinn, courtesy of Eithne Ní Bhraonáin. 

Miss Quinn

Holly

Eithne

Monday, September 6, 2004

Monday September 6, 2004

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:29 PM

An Invariant Feast

In memory of philosopher Robert D. Cumming, who took part in the liberation of Paris on the Feast of St. Louis, 1944, and who died on that same feast day, August 25, in 2004:

"We'll always have Paris."
 

Monday, August 30, 2004

Monday August 30, 2004

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:01 PM

Agon

for Penelope Doob,
Radcliffe '64:

"How much story do you want?"
— George Balanchine

Wednesday, January 8, 2003

Wednesday January 8, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:17 PM

In the Labyrinth of Memory

Taking a cue from Danny in the labyrinth of Kubrick’s film “The Shining,” today I retraced my steps.

My Jan. 6 entry, “Dead Poet in the City of Angels,” links to a set of five December 21, 2002, entries.  In the last of these, “Irish Lament,” is a link to a site appropriate for Maud Gonne’s birthday — a discussion of Yeats’s “Among School Children.”

Those who recall a young woman named Patricia Collinge (Radcliffe ’64) might agree that her image is aptly described by Yeats:

Hollow of cheek as though it drank the wind
And took a mess of shadows for its meat

This meditation leads in turn to a Sept. 20, 2002, entry, “Music for Patricias,” and a tune familiar to James Joyce, “Finnegan’s Wake,” the lyrics of which lead back to images in my entries of Dec. 20, 2002, “Last-Minute Shopping,” and of Dec. 28, 2002, “Solace from Hell’s Kitchen.”  The latter entry is in memory of George Roy Hill, director of “The Sting,” who died Dec. 27, 2002.

The Dec. 28 image from “The Sting” leads us back to more recent events — in particular, to the death of a cinematographer who won an Oscar for picturing Newman and Redford in another film — Conrad L. Hall, who died Saturday, Jan. 4, 2003. 

For a 3-minute documentary on Hall’s career, click here.

Hall won Oscars for “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” and “American Beauty,” and may win a posthumous Oscar for “Road to Perdition,” last year’s Irish-American mob saga:

“Tom Hanks plays Angel of Death Michael Sullivan. An orphan ‘adopted’ by crime boss John Rooney (Paul Newman), Sullivan worships Rooney above his own family. Rooney gave Sullivan a home when he had none. Rooney is the father Sullivan never knew. Too bad Rooney is the

Rock Island
branch of Capone’s mob.”

In keeping with this Irish connection, here is a set of images.

American Beauty
© Suzanne Harle 1997

Conrad L. Hall

 

A Game of Chess

I need a photo-opportunity.
I want a shot at redemption.
Don’t want to end up a cartoon
In a cartoon graveyard.
— Paul Simon

“Like a chess player, he knows that to win a tournament, it is sometimes wise to offer a draw in a game even when you think you can win it.”

Roger Ebert on Robert Duvall’s character in “A Civil Action”

Director Steven Zaillian will take part in a tribute to Conrad L. Hall at the Palm Springs International Film Festival awards ceremony on Jan 11.  Hall was the cinematographer for Zaillian’s films “A Civil Action” and “Searching for Bobby Fischer.” 

“A Civil Action” was cast by the Boston firm Collinge/Pickman Casting, named in part for that same Patricia Collinge (“hollow of cheek”) mentioned above.

See also “Conrad Hall looks back and forward to a Work in Progress.”  (“Work in Progress” was for a time the title of Joyce’s Finnegans Wake.)

What is the moral of all this remembrance?

An 8-page (paper) journal note I compiled on November 14, 1995 (feast day of St. Lawrence O’Toole, patron saint of Dublin, allegedly born in 1132) supplies an answer in the Catholic tradition that might have satisfied Joyce (to whom 1132 was a rather significant number): 

How can you tell there’s an Irishman present
at a cockfight?
     He enters a duck.
How can you tell a Pole is present?
     He bets on the duck.
How can you tell an Italian is present?
     The duck wins.

Every picture tells a story.

Hall wins Oscar for “American Beauty”

 

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