Log24

Sunday, March 28, 2021

Gap Dance

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:40 PM

“Plato and Hegel always recognized the importance of the  gap:
they invoke the gap (the opening, the separation, the division)
and they put it to work. The inescapable gaps that cannot  be bridged,
that cannot  be filled, play a central role in Derrida’s thought and in
our response to his death. The gaps in Derrida’s work resist the  gap;
they swerve, deviate and wander (écarter ) – gaps move . When someone
or something takes pre-cedence  (goes first, goes before, goes on ahead
and gives up its place ) a gap is opened. There (are) only gaps, the gaps
that Jacques Derrida has left behind him and  in front of him: the
pre-cedence of gaps. This tracing of gaps (écarts ) is a preface to an
impossible  mourning, a mourning that one must at once avoid and
affirm. It keeps returning to Derrida’s Dissemination  (1972)….”

— Page vii of The Impossible Mourning of Jacques Derrida ,
by Sean Gaston (Continuum Books, London/New York, 2006)

Later in the same book —

Friday, August 21, 2020

Gap Dance

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:22 AM

Continues.

“What would the pavement of the universe be
if there were gaps between the paving stones,
inaccessible and filled with nothing?”

— “Concerning Time,” by Iannis Xenakis and
Roberta Brown, on page 85, Perspectives of New Music ,
Vol. 27, No. 1 (Winter, 1989, pp. 84-92).

This post was suggested by the Aug. 19 remarks of
Karmela Padavic-Callaghan in Scientific American .

'Time's Arrow Flies through 500 Years of Classical Music'

Music for The Bowler and Casanova Frankenstein

Image from the website of the Scientific American  author.

Monday, February 10, 2020

Gap Dance

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:26 AM

But more, much more than that

… She did it  side ways.

In some earlier news from Development Hell

See as well this  journal's report of a death on that date.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Gap Dance

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 12:09 AM

From Wallace Stevens, "The Man with the Blue Guitar":

IX

And the color, the overcast blue
Of the air, in which the blue guitar
Is a form, described but difficult,
And I am merely a shadow hunched
Above the arrowy, still strings,
The maker of a thing yet to be made . . . .

"Arrowy, still strings" from the diamond theorem

Friday, December 9, 2016

Snow Dance

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 AM

See Ballet Blanc  in this journal.

For a darker perspective, click on the image below.

IMAGE- Detail of large 'Search for the Lost Tesseract' image with Amy Adams, Richard Zanuck, 'snowflake' structure, and white gloves

See also Cartier in The Hexagon of Opposition.

Happy birthday to Kirk Douglas.

Kirk Douglas in 'Diamonds'

Monday, March 29, 2021

Graduate School

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 5:37 PM

Also on 18 November 2010 —

Sunday, March 28, 2021

Logocentric Citation

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:29 PM

From the RSS feed of The Chronicle of Higher Education ‘s site
Arts & Letters Daily  this evening —

“Despite the wide scope of his bibliography and reception,
Derrida was a specialist in a subfield of his own design,
more or less: the philosophy of writing, which upends
the privileging of speech over writing that has dominated
Western metaphysics since Plato. This ‘phonocentrism’
(which Derrida yarns into ‘logocentrism,’ and eventually,
‘phallocentrism’) starts from a false premise, that the
moment of utterance in Aristotle’s view is somehow more
rhetorically ‘present’ than the kairos of writing….”

Andrew Marzoni,  March 10, 2021:
“Outside the Text: Jacques Derrida resists
easy canonization in a new hagiography for the Left.”
https://thebaffler.com/latest/outside-the-text-marzoni

A related image from this  journal
on that same date, March 10, 2021:

Wednesday, September 2, 2020

Little Metal Letters

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:00 PM

From a report of another August 14 death —

“… on Dec. 7, 1941, ‘it seemed as though everyone at Harvard
came to the Crimson building that night, and anxiously
hung over the ticker tape [i.e., teletype ] machine to watch the
little metal letters hammer out the words that told the story.'”

— Dan Huntington Fenn Jr., quoted in his Boston Globe obituary.

“Simplicity, clarity, showing the text” — The late Howell Binkley.

“To expand the words and music and dance” . . .

See Coconut Dance.

Thursday, August 20, 2020

Night at the Museum

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:58 AM

The Coconut Dance

Monday, February 10, 2020

Carney Art

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:56 PM

"Address the ball." — Art Carney in
"The Honeymooners," 1955.

See as well "Nightmare Alley."

Sunday, February 9, 2020

Hors d’Oeuvre

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , , — m759 @ 1:29 PM

From the May Day 2016 link above, in “Sunday Appetizer from 1984”

The 2015 German edition of Beautiful Mathematics ,
a 2011 Mathematical Association of America (MAA) book,
was retitled Mathematische Appetithäppchen —
Mathematical Appetizers . The German edition mentions
the author’s source, omitted in the original American edition,
for his section 5.17, “A Group of Operations” (in German,
5.17, “Eine Gruppe von Operationen”) —

Mathematische Appetithäppchen:
Faszinierende Bilder. Packende Formeln. Reizvolle Sätze

Autor: Erickson, Martin —

“Weitere Informationen zu diesem Themenkreis finden sich unter

http://​www.​encyclopediaofma​th.​org/
​index.​php/​Cullinane_​diamond_​theorem

und

http://​finitegeometry.​org/​sc/​gen/​coord.​html .”

That source was a document that has been on the Web
since 2002. The document was submitted to the MAA
in 1984 but was rejected. The German edition omits the
document’s title, and describes it as merely a source for
“further information on this subject area.”

From the Gap Dance link above, in “Reading for Devil’s Night” —

Das Nichts nichtet.” — Martin Heidegger.

And “Appropriation Appropriates.”

Thursday, January 23, 2020

The Demarcation of Nothing

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , , — m759 @ 3:50 PM

" nothing could be demarcated as 'hors d'oeuvre'…"

Geoffrey Hartman in his Haskins Lecture for 2000
(quoted here on Columbus Day, 2004).

See also May Day 2016 and Gap Dance.

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Decorated

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:00 AM

For those who prefer more elaborate decorations —

1.  A Facebook image from last August … 

2.  The Facebook glider suggests a tune from "The Thomas Crown Affair"
     (1968) that appeared in a Dec. 16, 2018 post on Christianity and
     "interlocking names"—

'The Eddington Song'

The revised lyrics describe a square space.

3.  An even more  elaborate square space:
     the Dance of the Snowflakes from
     Balanchine's version of The Nutcracker —

Friday, December 9, 2016

Still Point or Hole in the Data?

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:21 PM

Sacred Space (continued)

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

See Plan 9 in this journal.

 The 3x3 square 

Optimism

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:29 AM

As opposed to —

A Nov. 9 panel from the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard

Thursday, December 8, 2016

Space News

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:56 PM

"Bad news on the doorstep…." — American Pie


Update of 5:24 PM ET — A requiem chord

Tom Stoppard, Jumpers —

“Heaven, how can I believe in Heaven?” 
she sings at the finale.

“Just a lying rhyme for seven!”

Perhaps.

Monday, October 31, 2016

A Much-Needed Gap

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:00 PM

University of Chicago Press:

Sunday, October 30, 2016

Reading for Devil’s Night

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:00 PM

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

A Riddle for Davos

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 PM

Hexagonale Unwesen

Einstein and Thomas Mann, Princeton, 1938


IMAGE- Redefining the cube's symmetry planes: 13 planes, not 9.


See also the life of Diogenes Allen, a professor at Princeton
Theological Seminary, a life that reportedly ended on the date—
January 13, 2013— of the above Log24 post.

January 13 was also the dies natalis  of St. James Joyce.

Some related reflections —

"Praeterit figura huius mundi  " — I Corinthians 7:31 —

Conclusion of of "The Dead," by James Joyce—

The air of the room chilled his shoulders. He stretched himself cautiously along under the sheets and lay down beside his wife. One by one, they were all becoming shades. Better pass boldly into that other world, in the full glory of some passion, than fade and wither dismally with age. He thought of how she who lay beside him had locked in her heart for so many years that image of her lover's eyes when he had told her that he did not wish to live.

Generous tears filled Gabriel's eyes. He had never felt like that himself towards any woman, but he knew that such a feeling must be love. The tears gathered more thickly in his eyes and in the partial darkness he imagined he saw the form of a young man standing under a dripping tree. Other forms were near. His soul had approached that region where dwell the vast hosts of the dead. He was conscious of, but could not apprehend, their wayward and flickering existence. His own identity was fading out into a grey impalpable world: the solid world itself, which these dead had one time reared and lived in, was dissolving and dwindling.

A few light taps upon the pane made him turn to the window. It had begun to snow again. He watched sleepily the flakes, silver and dark, falling obliquely against the lamplight. The time had come for him to set out on his journey westward. Yes, the newspapers were right: snow was general all over Ireland. It was falling on every part of the dark central plain, on the treeless hills, falling softly upon the Bog of Allen and, farther westward, softly falling into the dark mutinous Shannon waves. It was falling, too, upon every part of the lonely churchyard on the hill where Michael Furey lay buried. It lay thickly drifted on the crooked crosses and headstones, on the spears of the little gate, on the barren thorns. His soul swooned slowly as he heard the snow falling faintly through the universe and faintly falling, like the descent of their last end, upon all the living and the dead.

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Well, she was just 17…*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:48 AM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110323-TaylorNYT.jpg

* For the title, see The Dance.

Friday, May 25, 2007

Friday May 25, 2007

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 7:11 AM
Dance and the Soul

From Log24 on
this date last year:

"May there be an ennui
of the first idea?
What else,
prodigious scholar,
should there be?"

— Wallace Stevens,
"Notes Toward a
Supreme Fiction"

The Associated Press,
May 25, 2007–

Thought for Today:
"I hate quotations.
 Tell me what you know."
— Ralph Waldo Emerson

[Journals, on May 3, 1849]

The First Idea:

The Line, by S. H. Cullinane

Four Elements:
 

Four Elements (Diamond)

Square Dance:

Square Dance (Diamond Theorem)

This "telling of what
I know" will of course
mean little to those
who, like Emerson,
have refused to learn
through quotations.

For those less obdurate
than Emerson —Harold Bloom
on Wallace Stevens

and Paul Valery's
   "Dance and the Soul"–

"Stevens may be playful, yet seriously so, in describing desire, at winter's end, observing not only the emergence of the blue woman of early spring, but seeing also the myosotis, whose other name is 'forget-me-not.' Desire, hearing the calendar hymn, repudiates the negativity of the mind of winter, unable to bear what Valery's Eryximachus had called 'this cold, exact, reasonable, and moderate consideration of human life as it is.' The final form of this realization in Stevens comes in 1950, in The Course of a Particular, in the great monosyllabic line 'One feels the life of that which gives life as it is.' But even Stevens cannot bear that feeling for long. As Eryximachus goes on to say in Dance and the Soul:

A cold and perfect clarity is a poison impossible to combat. The real, in its pure state, stops the heart instantaneously….[…] To a handful of ashes is the past reduced, and the future to a tiny icicle. The soul appears to itself as an empty and measurable form. –Here, then, things as they are come together, limit one another, and are thus chained together in the most rigorous and mortal* fashion…. O Socrates, the universe cannot for one instant endure to be only what it is.

Valery's formula for reimagining the First Idea is, 'The idea introduces into what is, the leaven of what is not.' This 'murderous lucidity' can be cured only by what Valery's Socrates calls 'the intoxication due to act,' particularly Nietzschean or Dionysiac dance, for this will rescue us from the state of the Snow Man, 'the motionless and lucid observer.'" —Wallace Stevens: The Poems of Our Climate

* "la sorte… la plus mortelle":
    mortal in the sense
   "deadly, lethal"

Other quotations

(from March 28,
the birthday of
Reba McEntire):

Logical Songs

Reba McEntire, Saturday Evening Post, Mar/Apr 1995

Logical Song I
(Supertramp)

"When I was young, it seemed that
Life was so wonderful, a miracle,
Oh it was beautiful, magical
And all the birds in the trees,
Well they'd be singing so happily,
Joyfully, playfully watching me"

Logical Song II
(Sinatra)

"You make me feel so young,
You make me feel like
Spring has sprung
And every time I see you grin
I'm such a happy in-
dividual….

You and I are
Just like a couple of tots
Running across the meadow
Picking up lots
Of forget-me-nots"

Sunday, July 17, 2005

Sunday July 17, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:59 PM

Dance

Yesterday’s AP “Thought for Today”–

“In some sort of crude sense which no vulgarity, no humor, no overstatement can quite extinguish, the physicists have known sin; and this is a knowledge which they cannot lose.” – J. Robert Oppenheimer, American physicist (1904-1967).

From Log24 on Dec. 17, 2002:

The Dancing Wu Li Masters,
by Gary Zukav, Harvard ’64:

“The Wu Li Masters know that physicists are doing more than ‘discovering the endless diversity of nature.’ They are dancing with Kali [or Durga], the Divine Mother of Hindu mythology.”

“Eastern religions have nothing to say about physics, but they have a great deal to say about human experience. In Hindu mythology, Kali, the Divine Mother, is the symbol for the infinite diversity of experience. Kali represents the entire physical plane. She is the drama, tragedy, humor, and sorrow of life. She is the brother, father, sister, mother, lover, and friend. She is the fiend, monster, beast, and brute. She is the sun and the ocean. She is the grass and the dew. She is our sense of accomplishment and our sense of doing worthwhile. Our thrill of discovery is a pendant on her bracelet. Our gratification is a spot of color on her cheek. Our sense of importance is the bell on her toe.

This full and seductive, terrible and wonderful earth mother always has something to offer. Hindus know the impossibility of seducing her or conquering her and the futility of loving her or hating her; so they do the only thing that they can do. They simply honor her.”

How could I dance with another….?

— John Lennon and Paul McCartney, 1962-1963  

See also yesterday‘s entry.
 

Friday, December 17, 2004

Friday December 17, 2004

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM
Christmas Dance at Taos

One grows used to the weather,
The landscape and that;
And the sublime comes down
To the spirit itself,

The spirit and space,
The empty spirit
In vacant space.

— Wallace Stevens,
"The American Sublime"

The Times Online on the artist Agnes Martin,
who died Dec. 16 in Taos, New Mexico:

"At a glance, or from a distance, her work looks like nothing at all. Square canvases are so palely touched with colour they might almost be blank. Considered slowly and carefully and close-up, however, the whole surface comes alive."

"The restraint and formal regularity of Martin’s work has led her often to be grouped with the Minimalists. She shares something of their self-effacing rigour and their concern with the material qualities of art, but she herself preferred to be seen in the context of the Abstract Expressionist painters who were her own contemporaries and early artistic models. Like them she may have seen abstract art as the means to a distinctively American sublime…."

"Taos had been a magnet for artists since the last years of the 19th century. D. H. Lawrence famously spent time there in the 1920s. 'Never shall I forget the Christmas dances at Taos,' he wrote, 'twilight, snow, the darkness coming over the great wintry mountains and the lonely pueblo.'"

Related material:

Pictures of Nothing,

Balanchine's Birthday.

Friday December 17, 2004

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:05 PM

Song in Red and Gray

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041217-WaterFlower2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.   The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041217-Agnes.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

From today's New York Times:

Agnes Martin, Abstract Painter, Dies at 92

Background: entry of 7 PM Wednesday.

Thursday, December 16, 2004

Thursday December 16, 2004

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:00 AM

Nothing Nothings
(Again)

Background: recent Log24 entries (beginning with Chorus from the Rock on Dec. 5, 2004) and Is Nothing Sacred? (quotations compiled on March 9, 2000).

From an obituary of Paul Edwards, a writer on philosophy, in this morning's New York Times:

"Heidegger's Confusions, a collection of Professor Edwards's scholarly articles, was published last month by Prometheus."

Edwards, born in Vienna in 1923 to Jewish parents, died on December 9.

Some sites I visited earlier this evening, before reading of Edwards's death:

  • " 'Nothingness itself nothings' — with these words, uttered by Martin Heidegger in the early 1930s, the incipient (and now-familiar) split between analytic and continental philosophy began tearing open. For Rudolf Carnap, a leader of the Vienna Circle [Wiener Kreis] of logical empiricists and a strident advocate of a new, scientific approach to philosophy, this Heideggerian proposition exemplified 'a metaphysical pseudo-sentence,' meaningless and unable to withstand any logical analysis. Heidegger countered that Carnap’s misplaced obsession with logic missed the point entirely."
    Review of A Parting of the Ways: Carnap, Cassirer, and Heidegger
  • "Death and Metaphysics," by Peter Kraus, pp. 98-111 in Death and Philosophy, ed. by Jeff Malpas and Robert Solomon.  Heidegger's famous phrase (misquoted by Quine in Gray Particular in Hartford) "Das Nichts selbst nichtet" is discussed on page 102.

Tuesday, December 17, 2002

Tuesday December 17, 2002

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 AM

ART WARS:


Just Seventeen

Durga

Today's site music*
is in honor of
a memorable date.

1963
Northern Songs.
Quiet may be restored by using
the midi control box at the top right
of this page.  Please let me know
if your browser is not showing
this control box.

 

Veronica  

From a June/July 1997
Hadassah Magazine article:

"Plato is obviously Jewish."

— Rebecca Goldstein

Readings on the Dark Lady  

From a July 27, 1997
New York Times article
by Holland Cotter:

"The single most important and sustained model for Khmer culture was India, from which Cambodia inherited two religions, Buddhism and Hinduism, and an immensely sophisticated art. This influence announces itself early in this exhibition in a spectacular seventh-century figure of the Hindu goddess Durga, whose hip-slung pose and voluptuous torso, as plush and taut as ripe fruit, combine the naturalism and idealism of the very finest Indian work."

From The Dancing Wu Li Masters,
by Gary Zukav, Harvard '64:

"The Wu Li Masters know that physicists are doing more than 'discovering the endless diversity of nature.' They are dancing with Kali [or Durga], the Divine Mother of Hindu mythology."

"Eastern religions have nothing to say about physics, but they have a great deal to say about human experience. In Hindu mythology, Kali, the Divine Mother, is the symbol for the infinite diversity of experience. Kali represents the entire physical plane. She is the drama, tragedy, humor, and sorrow of life. She is the brother, father, sister, mother, lover, and friend. She is the fiend, monster, beast, and brute. She is the sun and the ocean. She is the grass and the dew. She is our sense of accomplishment and our sense of doing worthwhile. Our thrill of discovery is a pendant on her bracelet. Our gratification is a spot of color on her cheek. Our sense of importance is the bell on her toe.

This full and seductive, terrible and wonderful earth mother always has something to offer. Hindus know the impossibility of seducing her or conquering her and the futility of loving her or hating her; so they do the only thing that they can do. They simply honor her."

How could I dance with another….?

— John Lennon and Paul McCartney, 1962-1963  

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