Log24

Friday, May 19, 2017

Heptapod Fluency at Yale

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:34 PM

". . . riverrun, past Eve and Adam's . . . ."

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Yale Architectural Figure

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:48 PM

Edwin Schlossberg, 'Still Changes Through Structure' text piece

See also Log24 posts related to "Go Set a Structure"
as well as "New Haven" + Grid.

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Y* is for Yale

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM

See "Sapir" in this journal as well as a Yale University page on Whorf:

* For a different view of "Y," see the previous post.

Sunday, February 21, 2016

The Masonic Mandorla

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:45 PM

A post for Tom Hanks and Dan Brown

Fictional Harvard professor of symbology Robert Langdon, as portrayed by Tom Hanks

Yahoo! President and CEO Marissa Mayer delivers a keynote
during the Yahoo Mobile Developers Conference on February 18,
2016, at Nob Hill Masonic Center in San Francisco, California.
Credit: Stephen Lam

Thursday, July 14, 2011

ART WARS continued:

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:01 AM

The Bauhaus Dance

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110714-BauhausRoof.jpg

See also The Ya Ya Mandorla

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110714-VesicaXOR.jpg

 

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110714-Michelangelo.jpg

Sunday, October 29, 2017

Sunday in the Park

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:18 PM

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-29/
mexico-city-day-of-dead-parade-honours-quake-rescuers/
9097134

Scholium —

Related material —  Sunday in the Park  in this  journal.

Damnation… Or Not?

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM

Related material —

Faust Vivifies Death with Wit and Humor
by April H. N. Yee, Harvard Crimson , Feb. 7, 2008.

See as well all posts now tagged Willow and Mandorla.

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Core

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 4:01 PM

From the New York Times Wire  last night —

"Mr. Hefner styled himself as an emblem
of the sexual revolution."

From a Log24 post on September 23 —

A different emblem related to other remarks in the above Sept. 23 post

On the wall— A Galois-geometry 'inscape'

(On the wall — a Galois-geometry inscape .)

The Last Word

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 6:00 AM

Remarks suggested by the previous post

From Jeremy Biles, "Introduction: The Sacred Monster," in
Ecce Monstrum: Georges Bataille and the Sacrifice of Form

(Fordham University Press, 2007, page 3) —

Bataille’s insistent conjunction of the monstrous and the sacred is the subject of this book. Regarded by many as one of the most important thinkers of our time, and acknowledged as an important influence by such intellectuals as Michel Foucault, Julia Kristeva, Maurice Blanchot, and Jacques Derrida, Bataille produced a corpus of wide-ranging writings bearing the monstrous marks of the affective and intellectual contradictions he also sought to produce in his readers. In the following chapters, I will specify some of the ways in which Bataille evokes monstrosity to elicit in himself and his audience an experience of simultaneous anguish and joy—an experience that he calls sacred. In particular, Bataille is fascinated with the ‘‘left-hand’’ sacred. In contradistinction to its lucent and form-conferring ‘‘right-hand’’ counterpart, the left-hand sacred is obscure and formless—not transcendent, pure, and beneficent, but dangerous, filthy, and morbid. This sinister, deadly aspect of the sacred is at once embodied in, and communicated by, the monster. As we will see, it is in beholding the monster that one might experience the combination of ecstasy and horror that characterizes Bataille ’s notion of the sacred.

The dual etymology of ‘‘monster’’ reveals that aspect of the sacred that enticed Bataille. According to one vein of etymological study, the Latin monstrum  derives from monstrare  (to show or display). The monster is that which appears before our eyes as a sign of sorts; it is a demonstration. But another tradition emphasizes a more ominous point. Deriving from monere  (to warn), the monster is a divine omen, a portent; it heralds something that yet remains unexpected, unforeseeable—as a sudden reversal of fortune. In the writings of Bataille, the monster functions as a monstrance, putting on display the sinister aspect of the sacred that Bataille sees as the key to a ‘‘sovereign’’ existence. But in doing so the monster presents us with a portent of something that we cannot precisely foresee, but something that, Bataille claims, can be paradoxically experienced in moments of simultaneous anguish and ecstasy: death.

See as well

(Order of news items transposed for aesthetic effect.)

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Badreads

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 6:11 AM

    See also a related Log24 post.

Saturday, September 23, 2017

The Turn of the Frame

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:19 AM

"With respect to the story's content, the frame thus acts
both as an inclusion of the exterior and as an exclusion
of the interior: it is a perturbation of the outside at the
very core of the story's inside, and as such, it is a blurring
of the very difference between inside and outside."

— Shoshana Felman on a Henry James story, p. 123 in
"Turning the Screw of Interpretation,"
Yale French Studies  No. 55/56 (1977), pp. 94-207.
Published by Yale University Press.

See also the previous post and The Galois Tesseract.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

The Zero Monstrance

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 6:00 AM

From "The Metaphysics of Entities," a post of Sept. 20, 2014 —

Anthony Lane in The New Yorker  on a 2013 film —

"The hero of 'The Zero Theorem' is a computer genius
called Qohen Leth (Christoph Waltz)…. He is the sole
resident of a derelict church, where, on a crucifix in front
of the altar, the head of Christ has been replaced by a
security camera. No prayers are ever said, and none are
answered."

Related dialogue from a 2008 film

Another view of the Zero Theorem derelict church —

Friday, May 19, 2017

Cover Girl

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:02 PM

See also the previous post.

In the Service of Narrative

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:40 PM

Quoted here on St. Stephen's Day, 2008

“Wayne C. Booth’s lifelong
 study of the art of rhetoric
 illuminated the means
 by which authors seduce,
 cajole and lie to their readers
 in the service of narrative.”

— New York Times, Oct. 11, 2005

Booth was a native of American Fork, Utah.

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Putting the Y in Vanity

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Amy Adams on the cover of the 
Vanity Fair  Hollywood issue, 2017

Line spoken to Adams's
character in Arrival

You approach language
like a mathematician.

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Shema, Faust

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM

"The quotes create the illusion
that the dead are still speaking
to the reader. Faust writes about
the efforts of spiritualists to believe
in an afterlife for their slain kin, but
she’s the one summoning spirits."

April Yee, Harvard Crimson
     staff writer, February 7, 2008

"0! = 1" 

Quine's Shema

See also yesterday's Into the Woods 
and posts now tagged Willow and Mandorla.

Monday, August 29, 2016

Into the Woods

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:19 AM

This just in:

Headline- 'Clown tries to lure kids into woods'

See also Cinderella in yesterday's post "As" —

The James Lapine version —

Thursday, March 3, 2016

Metaphors

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:19 PM

A rose on a Harvard University Press book cover (2014) —

A Log24 post's "lotus" (2004) —

A business mandorla (2016) —

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

The Eye/Mind Conflict

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 10:25 AM

Harold Rosenberg, "Art and Words," 
The New Yorker , March 29, 1969. From page 110:

"An advanced painting of this century inevitably gives rise
in the spectator to a conflict between his eye and his mind; 
as Thomas Hess has pointed out, the fable of the emperor's 
new clothes is echoed at the birth of every modemist art 
movement. If work in a new mode is to be accepted, the 
eye/mind conflict must be resolved in favor of the mind; 
that is, of the language absorbed into the work. Of itself, 
the eye is incapable of breaking into the intellectual system 
that today distinguishes between objects that are art and 
those that are not. Given its primitive function of 
discriminating among things in shopping centers and on 
highways, the eye will recognize a Noland as a fabric
design, a Judd as a stack of metal bins— until the eye's 
outrageous philistinism has been subdued by the drone of 
formulas concerning breakthroughs in color, space, and 
even optical perception (this, too, unseen by the eye, of 
course). It is scarcely an exaggeration to say that paintings 
are today apprehended with the ears. Miss Barbara Rose, 
once a promoter of striped canvases and aluminum boxes, 
confesses that words are essential to the art she favored 
when she writes, 'Although the logic of minimal art gained 
critical respect, if not admiration, its reductiveness allowed
for a relatively limited art experience.' Recent art criticism 
has reversed earlier procedures: instead of deriving principles 
from what it sees, it teaches the eye to 'see' principles; the 
writings of one of America's influential critics often pivot on 
the drama of how he failed to respond to a painting or 
sculpture the first few times he saw it but, returning to the 
work, penetrated the concept that made it significant and
was then able to appreciate it. To qualify as a member of the 
art public, an individual must be tuned to the appropriate 
verbal reverberations of objects in art galleries, and his 
receptive mechanism must be constantly adjusted to oscillate 
to new vocabularies."

New vocabulary illustrated:

Graphic Design and a Symplectic Polarity —

Background: The diamond theorem
and a zero system .

Saturday, February 1, 2014

ART WARS (continued)

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 PM

A sequel to Friday afternoon's Diamond Star

Diamond Star —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110905-StellaOctangulaView.jpg

Log24 on January 7, 2012 —

A doodle from this year's [2012’s]  Feast of the Epiphany

http://www.log24.com/log/pix12/120106-CathyHull-Hillman-Detail.jpg

A doodle based on today's previous post and on
a post for Twelfth Night, 2003

IMAGE- Quilt blocks- Devil's Claws and Yankee Puzzle

IMAGE- 'Yankee Doodle went to London' with musical notes

Context — All posts tagged "Eden."

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

A Girl’s Best Friend?*

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:25 AM

Continued from September 3rd, 2013.

On that date, there were two posts in this journal:

"The Stone" today suggests…"* and
"An End in Itself."

The former dealt with some philosophy and 
mathematics related to graphic design.

The latter dealt with death and finality.

The New York Times  today has an obituary
that, revisiting Sept. 3rd, unites the topics of
death and design.

Alvin Eisenman,
Graphic Design Educator,
Dies at 92

By DANIEL E. SLOTNIK
Published: September 10, 2013

Alvin Eisenman, a graphic designer who in 1951 became the first director of Yale’s graduate program for graphic design, the first offered by a major American university, died on Sept. 3 at his home, which he also designed, on Martha’s Vineyard. He was 92.  More>>

For greater depth, see the American Institute of Graphic Arts.

* This post's title and "The Stone" above refer to the New York Times
  philosophy column "The Stone"— In particular, to its Sept. 2nd post 
 "Women in Philosophy? Do the Math."

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Woman at the Well

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

For some images related to this rather biblical topic,

see Hillman + Dream in this journal.

“She was dazzled by light and shade, by the confusing
duplication of reflections and of frames. All coming from
too many directions for the mind to take account of.
The various images bounced against each other
until she felt a desperate vertigo….”

Cold Mountain

Summary image:

IMAGE- Quilt blocks- Devil's Claws and Yankee Puzzle

“… Margaret Murry, wrapped in an old patchwork quilt, sat on the foot of her bed….”

A Wrinkle in Time

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

Logo

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:18 PM

IMAGE- 'Yankee Puzzle' quilt block pattern on cover of Northrop Frye's 'Anatomy of Criticism'

On Universals and
A Passage to India
 :
 
"The universe, then, is less intimation
than cipher: a mask rather than a revelation
in the romantic sense. Does love meet with love?
Do we receive but what we give? The answer is
surely a paradox, the paradox that there are
Platonic universals beyond, but that the glass
is too dark to see them. Is there a light beyond
the glass, or is it a mirror only to the self?
The Platonic cave is even darker than Plato
made it, for it introduces the echo, and so
leaves us back in the world of men, which does
not carry total meaning, is just a story of events."
 
– Betty Jay, reader's guide to A Passage to India

http://www.log24.com/log/pix08/080413-Marabar.jpg

Judy Davis in the Marabar Caves

The above image is from this journal on Sunday, April 13, 2008.

The preceding cover of a book by Northrop Frye was suggested
by material in this journal from February 2003.

See also Yankee Puzzle and Doodle Dandy.

Saturday, January 7, 2012

Doodles

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:14 PM

Today's Google Doodle for the 100th birthday of Charles Addams—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix12/120107-GoogleDoodle-AddamsFamily.jpg

A doodle from this year's Feast of the Epiphany

http://www.log24.com/log/pix12/120106-CathyHull-Hillman-Detail.jpg

A doodle based on today's previous post and on a post for Twelfth Night, 2003

IMAGE- Quilt blocks- Devil's Claws and Yankee Puzzle

IMAGE- 'I'm a Yankee Doodle Dandy' musical notes

Thursday, February 12, 2009

Thursday February 12, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:11 AM
Headliners

Today, many observe
the 200th anniversary
of the birth of two
noted philosophers
of death:
Charles Darwin and
Abraham Lincoln.

A fitting headline:

FAUST VIVIFIES DEATH
(Harvard Crimson ,
February 7, 2008)

Happy birthday,
Cotton Mather.

Robert Stone,
A Flag for Sunrise :

Willow on tombstone from Lachlan Cranswick's homepage in Melbourne, Australia

"Our secret culture is as frivolous as a willow on a tombstone. It's a wonderful thing– or it was. It was strong and dreadful, it was majestic and ruthless. It was a stranger to pity. And it's not for sale, ladies and gentlemen."

Friday, September 5, 2008

Friday September 5, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:45 AM

For Mike Hammer

Block That Metaphor

“Michael Hammer, an engineer and author on management who helped popularize the ‘re-engineering’ movement in the 1990s, died Thursday [Sept. 4, 2008].

A spokesman for Mr. Hammer’s consulting firm, Hammer and Co., said Mr. Hammer died from cranial bleeding that began Aug. 22 while he was vacationing in Massachusetts. He was 60 years old.

Mr. Hammer was the co-author of the bestselling management book Reengineering the Corporation and founder and president of Hammer and Co., Cambridge, Mass.”

The Wall Street Journal

“An engineer by training, Hammer focused on the operational nuts and bolts of business.

Hammer’s relentless pursuit of ‘why?’ drove his entire career. ‘My modus operandi is simple,’ he once wrote, ‘though not always easy to carry out. I take nothing at face value. I approach all business issues and practices with the same skepticism: Why?’

A funeral will be held at 9:30 a.m. Friday, Sept. 5 in Stanetsky Memorial Chapel, 1668 Beacon St., Brookline. Interment will follow at the Shaarei Tefillah Section of the Chevra Shaas Cemetery at Baker Street Jewish Cemeteries in West Roxbury.”

web.mit.edu

Related material:

From Feb. 12:

Shoe: 'Mort's Mortuary,' Sunday, Feb. 10, 2008

From today:Outside the Box

The late Michael Hammer, engineer: 'Outside the Box'

“I need a photo opportunity,
I want a shot at redemption.
Don’t want to end up a cartoon
In a cartoon graveyard…”

Paul Simon

Bill Melendez, Peanuts animator, in NYT obituaries Friday, Sept. 5, 2008

Friday, April 25, 2008

Friday April 25, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 AM
Destabilizing
the Locus

 
"It is the intention
 of this piece
 to destabilize the locus
  of that authorial act…."

Yale art student
    Aliza Shvarts,
quoted today in
The Harvard Crimson

From Log24 on
March 14:



Rite of Spring

From the online 
Harvard Crimson

Anatomy exhibit at the Harvard Women's Center

Related material:

A figure from  
Monday's entry

Mandorla from center of ovato tondo

— and  
June 30, 2007's
Annals of Theology,
with a link to a film:
The Center of the World.

The center referred
to in that film is the
same generic "center"
displayed at Harvard
and in the above
mandorla: not the
Harvard Women's
Center, but rather
the women's center.

See also Yeats —
"the centre cannot hold,"

Stevens —
"the center of resemblance,"

and Zelazny —
"center loosens,
forms again elsewhere
."

Related material
from Google:

JSTOR: Killing Time
with Mark Twain's Autobiographies

frame "writing" within his own writing in order to destabilize the locus of his authorial voice and to promote a textual confusion that doubly displaces
links.jstor.org/…Similar pages

Other ways
of killing time:

From Log24 on April 21, the date of Mark Twain's death–

Psychoshop, by Alfred Bester and Roger Zelazny:

His manner was all charm and grace; pure cafe society….

He purred a chuckle. "My place. If you want to come, I'll show you."

"Love to. The Luogo Nero? The Black Place?"

"That's what the locals call it. It's really Buoco Nero, the Black Hole."

"Like the Black Hole of Calcutta?"

"No. Black Hole as in astronomy. Corpse of a dead star, but also channel between this universe and its next-door neighbor."

The Pennsylvania Lottery
yesterday, April 24, 2008:

Mid-day 923, Evening 765….

and hence Log24, 9/23 (2007), and page 765 of From Here to Eternity (Delta paperback, 1998):

He stayed that way for eight days, never what you could really call drunk, but certainly never anywhere near sober, and always with a bottle of Georgette's expensive scotch in one hand and a glass in the other. He did not talk at all except to say "Yes" or "No," mostly "No," when confronted with a direct question, and he never ate anything when they were there. It was like living in the same house with a dead person.

 

Monday, February 25, 2008

Monday February 25, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:00 PM
A System of Symbols

A book from
Yale University Press
discussed in Log24
four years ago today:

Inside Modernism: Relativity Theory, Cubism, Narrative

Click on image for details.

The book is titled
Inside Modernism:
Relativity Theory,
 Cubism, Narrative
.

For a narrative about relativity
and cubes, see Knight Moves.

Related material:

Geek chic in
this week's New Yorker

"… it takes a system of symbols  
to make numbers precise–
      to 'crystallize' them…."

— and a mnemonic for three
 days in October 2006
following a memorial to
 the Amish schoolchildren
slain that month:

Seven is Heaven,
Eight is a Gate,
Nine is a Vine.

Tuesday, February 12, 2008

Tuesday February 12, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:01 PM

Centerpiece

“Kirk Browning… television director of ‘Live* From Lincoln Center,’ died on Sunday [Feb. 10, 2008] in Manhattan. He was 86.

The cause was a heart attack, his son, David, said.
Kirk Browning, TV director of 'Live from Lincoln Center'

… In addition to his ‘Live From Lincoln Center’ programs, 10 of which won Emmy Awards, Mr. Browning… directed, among other productions… the first TV show with Frank Sinatra as host (1957); and ‘Hallmark Hall of Fame’ music and drama specials (1951 to 1958).”

The New York Times

In Memoriam:

Shoe: 'Mort's Mortuary,' Sunday, Feb. 10, 2008

* The timestamp of this entry is, however, not live. The entry was actually produced at about 5:55 AM on Feb. 13.  The timestamp of the entry, 5:01 PM on Lincoln’s Birthday, is a veiled reference to Cemetery Ridge, to the meadow in “Readings for Candlemas” (see also the previous two entries) and to a Gettysburg address.

Thursday, February 7, 2008

Thursday February 7, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:59 AM
The Football
Mandorla

New York Lottery, 2008:

NY Lottery Feb. 6, 2008: Mid-day 064, Evening 701

The Mandorla as Football

7/01 

"He pointed at the football
  on his desk. 'There it is.'"
Glory Road   

 

  "The Rock" — 

Goodspeed:
"I'll do my best."

Mason:

"Your best. Losers
always whine about
their best. Winners
go home and …."

 

"The
Wu  Li
Masters know
that physicists are
doing  more  than
'discovering  the endless
 diversity of nature.' They
 are  dancing with Kali,
 the Divine Mother of
 Hindu  mythology."
 — Gary Zukav,
 Harvard
 '64
 

Sunday, July 1, 2007

Sunday July 1, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:31 PM
Object Lesson
continued…

"Three times the concentred
     self takes hold, three times
The thrice concentred self,
     having possessed
The object, grips it
     in savage scrutiny,
Once to make captive,
     once to subjugate
Or yield to subjugation,
     once to proclaim
The meaning of the capture,
     this hard prize,
Fully made, fully apparent,
     fully found."

— "Credences of Summer," VII,
    by Wallace Stevens, from
    Transport to Summer (1947)

 

Mathematics of the football mandorla (vesica piscis)

For a religious
interpretation
of 265, see
Sept. 30, 2004.

For a religious
interpretation
of 153, see
Fish Story.
 
A quotation from
the Eater of Souls:

"That's how it is, Easy," my Coach went on, his voice more in sorrow than in anger. "Yardage is all very well but you don't make a nickel unless you cross that old goal line with the egg tucked underneath your arm." He pointed at the football on his desk. "There it is. I had it gilded and lettered clear back at the beginning of the season, you looked so good and I had so much confidence in you– it was meant to be yours at the end of the season, at a victory banquet."

Glory Road,
by Robert A. Heinlein
 

Friday, May 18, 2007

Friday May 18, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:29 AM
Devil in the Details

Today’s Harvard Crimson:

“Paul B. Davis ’07-’08, who contributed to a collection of student essays written in 2005 on the purpose and structure of a Harvard education, said that ‘the devil is in the details’….”

From the weblog of Peter Woit
:

The New Yorker keeps its physics theme going this week with cover art that includes a blackboard full of basic equations from quantum mechanics.”

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070518-Cover2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
May 21, 2007
New Yorker cover

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070518-CoverDetail.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
 
Detail

The detail suggests
the following
religious images from
Twelfth Night 2003:

Devil’s Claws, or
Hourglass Var. 3

Yankee Puzzle, or
Hourglass Var. 5

 
“Mercilessly tasteful”
 
— Andrew Mueller,
review of Suzanne Vega’s
Songs in Red and Gray

Friday, May 4, 2007

Friday May 4, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 5:01 PM

May '68 Revisited

"At his final Paris campaign rally… Mr. Sarkozy declared himself the candidate of the 'silent majority,' tired of a 'moral crisis in France not seen since the time of Joan of Arc.'

'I want to turn the page on May 1968,' he said of the student protests cum social revolution that rocked France almost four decades ago.

'The heirs of May '68 have imposed the idea that everything has the same worth, that there is no difference between good and evil, no difference between the true and the false, between the beautiful and the ugly and that the victim counts for less than the delinquent.'

Denouncing the eradication of 'values and hierarchy,' Mr. Sarkozy accused the Left of being the true heirs and perpetuators of the ideology of 1968."

— Emma-Kate Symons, Paris, May 1, 2007, in The Australian

Related material:

From the translator's introduction to Dissemination, by Jacques Derrida, translated by Barbara Johnson, University of Chicago Press, 1981, page xxxi —

"Both Numbers and 'Dissemination' are attempts to enact rather than simply state the theoretical upheavals produced in the course of a radical reevaluation of the nature and function of writing undertaken by Derrida, Sollers, Roland Barthes, Julia Kristeva and other contributors to the journal Tel Quel in the late 1960s. Ideological and political as well as literary and critical, the Tel Quel program attempted to push to their utmost limits the theoretical revolutions wrought by Marx, Freud, Nietzsche, Mallarme, Levi-Strauss, Saussure, and Heidegger."

This is the same Barbara Johnson who has served as the Frederic Wertham Professor of Law and Psychiatry in Society at Harvard.

Johnson has attacked "the very essence of Logic"–

"… the logic of binary opposition, the principle of non-contradiction, often thought of as the very essence of Logic as such….

Now, my understanding of what is most radical in deconstruction is precisely that it questions this basic logic of binary opposition….

Instead of a simple 'either/or' structure, deconstruction attempts to elaborate a discourse that says neither 'either/or', nor 'both/and' nor even 'neither/nor', while at the same time not totally abandoning these logics either."

— "Nothing Fails Like Success," SCE Reports 8, 1980

Such contempt for logic has resulted, for instance, in the following passage, quoted approvingly on page 342 of Johnson's  translation of Dissemination, from Philippe Sollers's Nombres (1966):

"The minimum number of rows– lines or columns– that contain all the zeros in a matrix is equal to the maximum number of zeros located in any individual line or column."

For a correction of Sollers's  Johnson's damned nonsense, click here.

Update of May 29, 2014:

The error, as noted above, was not Sollers's, but Johnson's.
See also the post of May 29, 2014 titled 'Lost in Translation.'

Thursday, March 8, 2007

Thursday March 8, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:13 PM
Introduction to Logic
for International Women's Day

"The logic behind such utterances is the logic
of binary opposition, the principle of non-contra-
diction, often thought of as the very essence of
Logic as such….

Now, my understanding of what is most radical
in deconstruction is precisely that it questions
this basic logic of binary opposition….

Instead of a simple 'either/or' structure,
deconstruction attempts to elaborate a discourse
that says neither "either/or", nor "both/and"
nor even "neither/nor", while at the same time
not totally abandoning these logics either."

Harvard professor Barbara Johnson
in "Nothing Fails Like Success."
(See the previous entry, Day Without Logic.)

The 16 Binary Connectives, with Venn Diagrams

Click to enlarge.

Those who value literary theory
more than they value truth
may prefer, on this
International Women's Day,
the "mandorla" interpretation
of the above diagrams.

For this interpretation, see
Death and the Spirit III,
Burning Bright,
and
The Agony and the Ya-Ya.

Saturday, July 30, 2005

Saturday July 30, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:21 AM

Born today: Laurence Fishburne

Matrix

"The nine-fold square has centre, periphery, axes and diagonals. But all are present only in their bare essentials. It is also a sequence of eight triads. Four pass through the centre and four do not. This is the garden of Apollo, the field of Reason, sheltered by the Gate from the turmoil of the Delta, with its endless cycles of erasure and reinscription. This is the Temple of Solomon, as inscribed, for example, by a nine-fold compartmentation to provide the ground plan of Yale…."

— Architects John Outram Associates
    on work at Rice University

Yale Daily News, Jan. 11, 2001:  

    "When New Haven was founded, the city was laid out into a grid of nine squares surrounded by a great wilderness.
    Last year History of Art Professor Emeritus Vincent Scully said the original town plan reflected a feeling that the new city should be sacred.
    Scully said the colony's founders thought of their new Puritan settlement as a 'nine-square paradise on Earth, heaven on earth, New Haven, New Jerusalem.'"

"Real and unreal are two in one:
    New Haven
 Before and after one arrives…."

 — Wallace Stevens,
    "An Ordinary Evening in New Haven,' XXVIII
 

Related material:
 Log24 entries on
St. Peter's Day, 2004

Thursday, July 29, 2004

Thursday July 29, 2004

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:09 AM

In loving memory of
Fred “Bubba” LaRue,
architect of Nixon’s
   “southern strategy” —

Part of a Log24 entry
for Saturday, July 24,
LaRue’s apparent
date of death —

Southern
Strategy
Galore:

The Agony
and the Ecstasy

and

a mandorla,
symbol of the Episcopal
Diocese of South Carolina.

The New York Times quotes
LaRue’s son as saying,
“His heart failed while he was
reading a book.”
The title is unknown.

Saturday, July 24, 2004

Saturday July 24, 2004

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:09 AM

Is Nothing Sacred
(3/09
), continued…

“With a holy host of others
     standing ’round me
Still I’m on the dark side
     of the moon
And it seems like it goes on
     like this forever
You must forgive me
If I’m up and gone to
     Carolina in my mind.”

— James Taylor

“The town of Mount Pleasant
is known for its excellent
public schools, some of the best
in the Charleston School District
and in the State.”

The Agent-Owned Realty Co.

Assignments from
a Mount Pleasant high school
summer honors course
….

  1. READ the first two chapters
    of The Source
    by James Michener.
     (1-111)….
  2. WATCH one of the
    following movies:
    The Agony and the Ecstasy,
    A Man for All Seasons,
    Ben Hur,
    Spartacus,
    or
    The Lion in Winter.

The Agony
and the Ecstasy

and

mandorla,
symbol of the Episcopal
Diocese of South Carolina,
from Log24 entries,
Oct. 4-7, 2002

Sunday, January 5, 2003

Sunday January 5, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:12 AM

Whirligig

Thus the whirligig of time brings in his revenges.
Twelfth Night. Act v. Sc. 1.

Twelfth night is the night of January 5-6.

Tonight is twelfth night in Australia; 4 AM Jan. 5
in New York City is 8 PM Jan. 5 in Sydney.


An October 6 entry:

Twenty-first Century Fox

On Sunday, October 6, 1889, the Moulin Rouge music hall opened in Paris, an event that to some extent foreshadowed the opening of Fox Studios Australia in Sydney on November 7, 1999.  The Fox ceremonies included, notably, Kylie Minogue singing "Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friend." 

 

Red Windmill

Kylie Minogue

For the mathematical properties of the red windmill (moulin rouge) figure at left, see Diamond Theory.

An October 5 entry:

The Message from Vega

"Mercilessly tasteful"
 — Andrew Mueller,
review of Suzanne Vega's
"Songs in Red and Gray"


In accordance with the twelfth-night
"whirligig of time" theme,
here are two enigmatic quilt blocks:

Devil's Claws, or
Hourglass Var. 3

Yankee Puzzle, or
Hourglass Var. 5

 
One can approach these symbols in either a literary or a mathematical fashion. For a purely mathematical discussion of the differences in the two symbols' structure, see Diamond Theory. Those who prefer literary discussions may make up their own stories.
 
"Plato is wary of all forms of rapture other than reason's. He is most deeply leery of, because himself so susceptible to, the literary imagination. He speaks of it as a kind of holy madness or intoxication and goes on to link it to Eros, another derangement that joins us, but very dangerously, with the gods."
 
Rebecca Goldstein in The New York Times,
    December 16, 2002 
 
"It's all in Plato, all in Plato; bless me,
what do they teach them at these schools?"
 
— C. S. Lewis in the Narnia Chronicles 

Friday, October 4, 2002

Friday October 4, 2002

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:17 AM

ART WARS:
The Agony and the Ya-Ya

Today’s birthdays:

  • Charlton Heston
  • Anne Rice
  • Patti LaBelle

To honor the birth of these three noted spiritual leaders, I make the following suggestion: Use the mandorla as the New Orleans Mardi Gras symbol.  Rice lives in New Orleans and LaBelle’s classic “Lady Marmalade” deals with life in that colorful city.

What, you may well ask, is the mandorla? This striking visual symbol was most recently displayed prominently at a meeting of U.S. cardinals in the Pope’s private library on Shakespeare’s birthday.  The symbol appears in the upper half of a painting above the Pope.

From Church Anatomy:

The illustration below shows how Barbara G. Walker in her excellent book “The Woman’s Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets” describes the mandorla.

 

The Agony
and the Ecstasy

Based on a novel by Irving Stone, this 1965 movie focuses on the relationship between Michelangelo (Charlton Heston) and Pope Julius II (Rex Harrison), who commissioned the artist to paint the Sistine Chapel ceiling.

Vesica piscis

Mandorla, “almond,” the pointed-oval sign of the yoni, is used in oriental art to signify the divine female genital; also called vesica piscis, the Vessel of the Fish. Almonds were holy symbols because of their female, yonic connotations.

Christian art similarly used the mandorla as a frame for figures of God, Jesus, and saints, because the artists forgot what it formerly meant. I. Frazer, G.B., 403

 
For further details on the mandorla (also known as the “ya-ya”) see my June 12, 2002, note The Ya-Ya Monologues.
 
A somewhat less lurid use of the mandorla in religious art — the emblem of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina, taken from the website of St. Michael’s Church in Charleston — is shown below.
 

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