Log24

Tuesday, July 28, 2020

Burying the Lede

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:52 PM

The New York Times   reports  a July 14 death —

“… Dr, Lauersen … was once married to the heiress
and dance patron Rebekah West Harkness ….” [Links added.]

Saturday, July 27, 2019

Tonality

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:19 PM
 

https://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=22045

. . . the ancient Chinese made music the pinnacle of wisdom.

There was a Classic of Music (Yuè jīng 樂經), but it was lost already by the Han Dynasty (206 BC-220 AD).  Yet we know the esteem in which music was held by the ancient Chinese from passages in the classics like the following:

The Master heard the Shao in Qi and for three months did not notice the taste of the meat he ate. He said, 'I never dreamt the joys of music could reach such heights.'(D.C. Lau)

Analects  7.14

Shao is the music of the mythical emperor, Shun 舜.

Qi one of the Warring States.

Extensive commentary here.

Another instance of the sublimity of music in ancient China is the description of the performance of the Yellow Emperor's "The Pond of Totality" in chapter 14 of the Zhuang Zi  (see Victor H. Mair, tr., Wandering on the Way  [Bantam, 1994; University of Hawaii Press, 1998], pp. 132-136, available here).

Conversely, language studies in traditional China were referred to as "minor learning" (xiǎoxué 小學).

November 5, 2015 @ 4:05 pm · Filed by Victor Mair under Language and musicLanguage and philosophy

See also Ervin Wilson in Wikipedia, and a Log24 post from
the date of his death — December 8, 2016.

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

Gate of Heavenly Peace

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:29 AM

Wikipedia — 

"The Tian'anmen (also Tiananmen or Tienanmen)
([tʰjɛ́n.án.mə̌n]), or the Gate of Heavenly Peace, is
a monumental gate in the centre of Beijing, widely
used as a national symbol of China. First built during
the Ming dynasty in 1420, Tiananmen was the entrance
to the Imperial City . . . ."

A related article on Chinese history, The Critical Moment,
suggests an associated (if only by title) webpage —

See as well The Painted Word .

Sunday, July 1, 2018

The Perpetual Motion of T. S. Eliot

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:28 AM

IMAGE- Cube for study of I Ching group actions, with Jackie Chan and Nicole Kidman

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

Brightness at Noon (continued)

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Wikipedia:

The Chinese name of the gate, Tiānānmén 天安門 …
is made up of the Chinese characters for "heaven,"
"peace" and "gate" respectively, which is why the
name is conventionally translated as "The Gate of
Heavenly Peace". However, this translation is
somewhat misleading, since the Chinese name is
derived from the much longer phrase "receiving the
mandate from heaven, and stabilizing the dynasty."

Another anniversary today:

IMAGE- 'Royals celebrate 60th anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II's coronation'

See also some related philosophy and mathematics.

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

For Black Widow

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:56 PM

I need a photo opportunity
I want a shot at redemption
Don't want to end up a cartoon
In a cartoon graveyard

— Paul Simon

See also the name Romanova
and the name Anastasia.

Wednesday, January 5, 2011

True Grid Example

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 PM

See today's earlier posts Ode and True Grid (continued) and, in the latter's
context of tic-tac-toe war games —  Balance, from Halloween 2005 —

IMAGE- The ninefold square

“An asymmetrical balance is sought since it possesses more movement.
This is achieved by the imaginary plotting of the character
upon a nine-fold square, invented by some ingenious writer of the Tang dynasty.
If the square were divided in half or in four, the result would be symmetrical,
but the nine-fold square permits balanced asymmetry."

Paraphrase of a passage in Chiang Yee's Chinese Calligraphy

Thursday, January 7, 2010

Lesson No. One

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:01 AM

 

“Zhu Xi maintained that all things are brought into being by the union of two universal aspects of reality: qi, sometimes translated as vital (or physical, material) force; and li, sometimes translated as rational principle (or law).” —Wikipedia

 

“Drop off the key, Lee” — Paul Simon

The 3x3 Grid

Reference frame (Click for details.)

According to Chu Hsi [Zhu Xi],

The word 'Li'

“Li” is “the principle or coherence or order or pattern underlying the cosmos.”

– Smith, Bol, Adler, and Wyatt, Sung Dynasty Uses of the I Ching,
Princeton University Press, 1990

Related material:

Dynasty and

Lesson Number One.

Monday, October 31, 2005

Monday October 31, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 2:00 AM
Balance

The image “http://log24.com/log/pix03/030109-gridsmall.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

"An asymmetrical balance is sought since it possesses more movement. This is achieved by the imaginary plotting of the character upon a nine-fold square, invented by some ingenious writer of the Tang dynasty. If the square were divided in half or in four, the result would be symmetrical, but the nine-fold square permits balanced asymmetry."

— Chiang Yee, Chinese Calligraphy,
   
quoted in Aspen no. 10, item 8

"'Burnt Norton' opens as a meditation on time. Many comparable and contrasting views are introduced. The lines are drenched with reminiscences of Heraclitus' fragments on flux and movement….  the chief contrast around which Eliot constructs this poem is that between the view of time as a mere continuum, and the difficult paradoxical Christian view of how man lives both 'in and out of time,' how he is immersed in the flux and yet can penetrate to the eternal by apprehending timeless existence within time and above it. But even for the Christian the moments of release from the pressures of the flux are rare, though they alone redeem the sad wastage of otherwise unillumined existence. Eliot recalls one such moment of peculiar poignance, a childhood moment in the rose-garden– a symbol he has previously used, in many variants, for the birth of desire. Its implications are intricate and even ambiguous, since they raise the whole problem of how to discriminate between supernatural vision and mere illusion. Other variations here on the theme of how time is conquered are more directly apprehensible. In dwelling on the extension of time into movement, Eliot takes up an image he had used in 'Triumphal March': 'at the still point of the turning world.' This notion of 'a mathematically pure point' (as Philip Wheelwright has called it) seems to be Eliot's poetic equivalent in our cosmology for Dante's 'unmoved Mover,' another way of symbolising a timeless release from the 'outer compulsions' of the world. Still another variation is the passage on the Chinese jar in the final section. Here Eliot, in a conception comparable to Wallace Stevens' 'Anecdote of the Jar,' has suggested how art conquers time:

       Only by the form, the pattern,
Can words or music reach
The stillness, as a Chinese jar still
Moves perpetually in its stillness."

— F. O. Matthiessen,
   The Achievement of T.S. Eliot,
   Oxford University Press, 1958,
   as quoted in On "Burnt Norton"

Thursday, November 6, 2003

Thursday November 6, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 2:00 PM

Legacy Codes:

The Most Violent Poem

Lore of the Manhattan Project:

From The Trinity Site

“I imagined Oppenheimer saying aloud,
‘Batter my heart, three person’d God,”
unexpectedly recalling John Donne’s ‘Holy Sonnet [14],’
and then he knew, ‘ “Trinity” will do.’
Memory has its reasons.

‘Batter my heart’ — I remember these words.
I first heard them on a fall day at Duke University in 1963.
Inside a classroom twelve of us were
seated around a long seminar table
listening to Reynolds Price recite this holy sonnet….

I remember Reynolds saying, slowly, carefully,
‘This is the most violent poem in the English language.’ ”

Related Entertainment

Today’s birthday:
director Mike Nichols

From a dead Righteous Brother:

“If you believe in forever
Then life is just a one-night stand.”

Bobby Hatfield, found dead
in his hotel room at
7 PM EST Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2003,
before a concert scheduled at
Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo
.

From a review of The Matrix Revolutions:

“You’d have to be totally blind at the end
to miss the Christian symbolism….
Trinity gets a glimpse of heaven…. And in the end…
God Put A Rainbow In The Clouds.”

Moral of the
Entertainment:

According to Chu Hsi [Zhu Xi],

“Li” is
“the principle or coherence
or order or pattern
underlying the cosmos.”

— Smith, Bol, Adler, and Wyatt,
Sung Dynasty Uses of the I Ching,
Princeton University Press, 1990

Related Non-Entertainment

Symmetry and a Trinity
(for the dotting-the-eye symbol above)

Introduction to Harmonic Analysis
(for musical and historical background)

Mathematical Proofs
(for the spirit of Western Michigan
University, Kalamazoo)

Moral of the
Non-Entertainment:

“Many kinds of entity
become easier to handle
by decomposing them into
components belonging to spaces
invariant under specified symmetries.”

The importance of
mathematical conceptualisation

by David Corfield,
Department of History and
Philosophy of Science,
University of Cambridge

See, too,
Symmetry of Walsh Functions and
Geometry of the I Ching.

Wednesday, December 18, 2002

Wednesday December 18, 2002

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 AM

For the Dark Lady

On this midnight in the garden of good and evil, our new site music is “Nica’s Dream.”

From a website on composer Horace Silver:

“Horace Silver apparently composed Nica’s Dream (1956) for Baroness Pannonica de Koenigswarter-Rothschild, an English aristocrat and a very dear friend of his. She was known to the New York press as the Jazz Baroness and to the black musicians for whom she was something of a patron, simply as Nica. Her apartment in the fashionable Hotel Stanhope on Fifth Avenue became a ‘hospitality suite for some of the greatest jazz players of the day, whom she treated generously.’ (Jack Chambers, Milestones: The Music and Times of Miles Davis, University of Toronto Press, 1985, 1:248)

This music is not unrelated to the work of Thomas Pynchon.  From an essay by Charles Hollander:  

“There are some notable parallels between Nica and the woman Stencil knows as V., who started her career with ‘…a young crude Mata Hari act.’ (V.; 386)….  Not that V. is Nica in any roman a clef sense: she is not. But the resonances are powerful at the level of the subtext. Nica is a Rothschild whose life reflects the issues Pynchon wants us to attend in V.: disinheritance, old dynasty vs. new dynasty, secret agents and couriers, plots and counter-plots, ‘The Big One, the century’s master cabal,’ and ‘the ultimate Plot Which Has No Name’ (V.; 226)….” 

See also my journal entry for the December 16-17 midnight, “Just Seventeen.”

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