Log24

Monday, October 18, 2010

For St. Luke’s Day —

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 6:00 PM
 

The Turning

"To everything, turn, turn, turn…

Quaternion Rotations in a Finite Geometry

… there is a season, turn, turn, turn…"

For less turning and more seasons, see a search in this journal for

fullness + multitude + "cold mountain."

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Tuesday September 30, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:14 AM
Hole in the Wall

Loren Eiseley,
Notes of an Alchemist:

I never found
the hole in the wall;
I never found
Pancho Villa country
where you see the enemy first.

— “The Invisible Horseman”

This quotation is the result of
the following meditation:

Part I:

The Feast of St. Michael
and All Angels

On Michaelmas 2008 (yesterday):

The mailman brought next Sunday’s New York Times Book Review. On the last page was an essay by Steven Millhauser, “The Ambition of the Short Story.” It said that…

“The short story concentrates on its grain of sand, in the fierce belief that there– right there, in the palm of its hand– lies the universe. It seeks to know that grain of sand the way a lover seeks to know the face of the beloved.”

Part II:
An Actor’s Lesson

A search for the “grain of sand” phrase in this journal yielded a quotation from actor Will Smith:

“Smith has just finished reading The Alchemist, by the Brazilian writer Paulo Coelho: ‘It says the entire world is contained in one grain of sand, and you can learn everything you need to learn about the entire universe from that one grain of sand. That is the kind of concept I’m teaching my kids.'”

The quotation’s source is The Independent of July 9, 2004.

Part III:
A date with Reba

The date of The Independent‘s story turns out to contain, in this journal, a meditation on white-trash food and Reba McEntire.

(Recall her classic lyric
“I might have been born
just plain white trash,
but Fancy was my name.”)


It also contains the Notes of an Alchemist quotation above.


“Let, then, winged Fancy find
Thee a mistress to thy mind”

— John Keats, “Fancy

A passage closely related to Keats’s poem:

FullnessMultitude.”

These are the missing last words of Inman in Cold Mountain, added here on the Feast of St. Luke, 2004.  For the meaning of these words, click on Luke.

Thursday, December 27, 2007

Thursday December 27, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:22 AM
Chronicles

FullnessMultitude.”

— The missing last words
of Inman in Cold Mountain,
added here on the
Feast of St. Luke, 2004

II Chronicles 1:

7: In that night did God appear unto Solomon, and said unto him, Ask what I shall give thee.
8: And Solomon said unto God, Thou hast shewed great mercy unto David my father, and hast made me to reign in his stead.
9: Now, O LORD God, let thy promise unto David my father be established: for thou hast made me king over a people like the dust of the earth in multitude.
10: Give me now wisdom and knowledge, that I may go out and come in before this people: for who can judge this thy people, that is so great?

On Kirk Varnedoe

“At 42– a professor with no museum experience– he was named curator of painting and sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art. It was, and is, the most influential job in the fluid, insular, fiercely contentious world of modern art. Just two decades past his last Amherst game, the lineman from Savannah was sitting in the chair where the most critical decisions in his profession are made– ‘the conscientious, continuous, resolute distinction of quality from mediocrity,’ according to his Olympian predecessor Alfred Barr. The Modern and its chief curator serve the American art establishment as a kind of aesthetic Supreme Court, and most of their rulings are beyond appeal.”

Hal Crowther

On Quality

Varnedoe, in his final
Mellon lecture at
the National Gallery,
quoted “Blade Runner”–
“I’ve seen things
you people wouldn’t believe….”Frank Rich of The New York Times
on the United States of America:”A country where
entertainment is god.”

Rich’s description may or may not
be true of the United States, but
it certainly seems true of
The New York Times:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix07A/071227-NYTobitsSm.jpg

Click on image to enlarge.

Related material:

Art Wars

Monday, October 18, 2004

Monday October 18, 2004

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:33 PM

Counting Crows
on the Feast of St. Luke

"In the fullness of time,
educated people will believe
there is no soul
independent of the body,
and hence no life after death."

Francis Crick, who was awarded
a Nobel Prize on this date in 1962

"She went to the men on the ground and looked at them and then she found Inman apart from them. She sat and held him in her lap. He tried to talk, but she hushed him. He drifted in and out and dreamed a bright dream of a home. It had a coldwater spring rising out of a rock, black dirt fields, old trees. In his dream, the year seemed to be happening all at one time, all the seasons blending together.  Apple trees hanging heavy with fruit but yet unaccountably blossoming, ice rimming the spring, okra plants blooming yellow and maroon, maple leaves red as October, corn crops tasseling, a stuffed chair pulled up to the glowing parlor hearth, pumpkins shining in the fields, laurels blooming on the hillsides, ditch banks full of orange jewelweed, white blossoms on dogwood, purple on redbud.  Everything coming around at once.  And there were white oaks, and a great number of crows, or at least the spirits of crows, dancing and singing in the upper limbs.  There was something he wanted to say."

— Charles Frazier, Cold Mountain

"FullnessMultitude."
 

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