Log24

Thursday, January 17, 2019

The Dreaming Jewels’ Nightmares

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 PM

Some Log24 posts related to Theodore Sturgeon's 1950 tale
of The Dreaming Jewels  have been tagged with that title.

For a purely mathematical approach to Sturgeon's concept see . . .

July 6, 2014, Amsterdam master's thesis on geometric models of the Golay code and Mathieu group

For some related nightmares, see July 2014 in this journal.

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

The Jewel in the Lotus

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 PM

Meets the Kernel in the Nutshell.

This post was suggested by the title of Natalie Wolchover's
article in Quanta Magazine today,
"A Fight for the Soul of Science."

The post continues a meditation on the number 6
as the kernel in the nutshell of 15.

For an illustration of the 6 in the 15,
see nocciolo  in this journal.

For an illustration of the jewel in the lotus,
see that  phrase in this journal.

Friday, March 29, 2013

The Dreaming Jewels (continued)

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:00 AM

In Memoriam

"In the late ’60s, Williams became a friend and confidant
of science fiction writer Philip K. Dick and wrote about
the iconoclastic author in Rolling Stone  in 1974.
Williams eventually completed a biography on Dick
and became his literary executor after the writer’s death
in 1982. He also edited The Complete Stories of
Theodore Sturgeon, Vol. I-XII 
."

— Yesterday in the Hollywood Reporter —
Pioneering Rock Journalist Paul S. Williams Dies at 64
4:06 PM PDT 3/28/2013 by Mitch Myers

See also Crawdaddy Story and The Dreaming Jewels
in this journal.

Related reading: Yesterday's noon post and Puzzles.

Update of 8:20 AM Good Friday, 2013:

IMAGE- Daily Princetonian, Good Friday, 2013: James Diamond, rabbi and retired director of Princeton's University's Center for Jewish Life. Diamond was killed in a Princeton auto accident Thursday morning at about 9:42 AM ET.

Friday, June 8, 2012

For Ravenna

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:59 PM

Click to enlarge:

IMAGE- NY Times June 8, 2012, on Bertrand Russell (Jim Holt discusses physicists' churlishness) and on Queen Ravenna (A.O. Scott, 'The Darker Side of the Story')

… And why is  a raven like a writing desk?

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

The Lotus Gate*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Image-- The Jewel in Venn's Lotus (Zen in Cuernavaca)
The Jewel
in Venn's Lotus

See also a prequel to
  Ramanujan's Flowering Tree

Flowering Judas.

* “Every city has its gates, which need not be of stone. Nor need soldiers be upon them or watchers before them. At first, when cities were jewels in a dark and mysterious world, they tended to be round and they had protective walls. To enter, one had to pass through gates, the reward for which was shelter from the overwhelming forests and seas, the merciless and taxing expanse of greens, whites, and blues–wild and free–that stopped at the city walls.

In time the ramparts became higher and the gates more massive, until they simply disappeared and were replaced by barriers, subtler than stone, that girded every city like a crown and held in its spirit.”

Mark Helprin, Winter’s Tale

Sunday, July 21, 2019

Space Speaks, Time Listens

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:17 AM

'The Power Of The Center: A Study of Composition in the Visual Arts,' by Rudolf Arnheim

Also on April 17, 2012 — A Wikimedia image upload —

See as well a Log24 search for "Space Itself."

Saturday, July 20, 2019

404 Found!

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:14 PM

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Permutahedron Dream

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 3:21 PM

The geometric object of the title appears in a post mentioning Bourgain 
in this journal.  Bourgain appears also in today's online New York Times —

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/16/
obituaries/jean-bourgain-dead.html
 .

Bourgain reportedly died on December 22.

An image from this journal on that date

Related poetic meditations —

IMAGE- Herbert John Ryser, 'Combinatorial Mathematics' (1963), page 1

The Dreaming Polyhedron

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 5:32 AM

"Here is a recipe for preparing a copy of the Mathieu group M24.
The main ingredient is a genus-3 regular polyhedron X
with 56 triangular faces, 84 edges, and 24 vertices.
The most delicate part of this recipe is to hold the polyhedron
by the 24 vertices and immerse the rest of it in 3-dimensional space."

— "How to Make the Mathieu Group M24 ," undated webpage
by David A. Richter, Western Michigan University

Illustration from that page —

Illustration from a webpage by David A. Richter, Western Michigan University

"Another model of the (universal cover of the) polyhedron X"

Related fiction —

Cover of a 1971 British paperback edition of The Dreaming Jewels,  
a story by Theodore Sturgeon (first version published in 1950):

Discuss Richter's model and the Sturgeon tale 
in the context of posts tagged Aitchison.

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Archimedes at Hiroshima

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 7:35 PM

Two examples from the Wikipedia article  "Archimedean solid" —

Iain Aitchison said in a talk last year at Hiroshima that
the Mathieu group M24  can be represented as permuting
naturally the 24 edges  of the cuboctahedron.

The 24 vertices  of the truncated  octahedron are labeled 
naturally by the 24 elements of S4  in a permutahedron

Can M24  be represented as permuting naturally
the 24 vertices  of the truncated octahedron?

 
 

Sunday, January 6, 2019

For Broom Bridge*

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

GL(2,3) is not unrelated to GL(3,2).

See Quaternion Automorphisms 
and Spinning in Infinity.

* See Wikipedia.

Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Transition

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:16 PM

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Soul Notes

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:02 PM

See pages 36 and 37 of Suzanne Gieser's The Innermost Kernel 
as well as PyrE in The Stars My Destination  and Old St. Patrick's*
in "Gangs of New York."

For some related aesthetic remarks, see a New Yorker  essay
published onlne today and this  journal's previous post.

* The older  version of the "Old St. Patrick's"
    of The Stars My Destination . (Update of 4/21/16.)

Monday, December 7, 2015

Neon Joe, Werewolf Hunter

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 10:48 PM

For the title, see The New York Times  and the oeuvre  of Joseph Kosuth.

From The Dreaming Jewels , by Theodore Sturgeon:

"Oh. And the crystals make things — even complete things — like Tin Pan Alley makes songs."

"Something like it." Zena smiled. It was the first smile in a long while. "Sit down, honey; I'll bring the toast. Now — this is my guess — when two crystals mate, something different happens. They make a whole thing. But they don't make it from just anything the way the single crystals do. First they seem to die together. For weeks they lie like that. After that they begin a together-dream. They find something near them that's alive, and they make it over. They replace it, cell by cell. You can't see the change going on in the thing they're replacing. It might be a dog; the dog will keep on eating and running around; it will howl at the moon and chase cats. But one day — I don't know how long it takes — it will be completely replaced, every bit of it."

"Then what?"

"Then it can change itself — if it ever thinks of changing itself. It can be almost anything if it wants to be."

Bunny stopped chewing, thought, swallowed, and asked, "Change how?"

"Oh, it could get bigger or smaller. Grow more limbs. Go into a funny shape — thin and flat, or round like a ball. If it's hurt it can grow new limbs. And it could do things with thought that we can't even imagine. Bunny, did you ever read about werewolves?"

"Those nasty things that change from wolves to men and back again?"

Zena sipped coffee. "Mmm. Well, those are mostly legends, but they could have started when someone saw a change like that."

See as well The Dreaming Jewels 
and "Steven Universe" in this journal.

You can't make this stuff up.

Wittgenstein Illustrated

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 1:17 PM

From "AMNESIA: VARIOUS, LUMINOUS, FIXED,"
An exhibition by Joseph Kosuth at
Sprüth Magers Gallery London,
NOVEMBER 26 2014 – FEBRUARY 14 2015 —

This journal, NOVEMBER 26 2014 –

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Mathematics and Narrative

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:00 PM 

Mathematics:  Galois-Plane Models.

Narrative: "The Dreaming Jewels."

This journal, FEBRUARY 14 2015 —

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Sacramental Geometry:

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

The Dreaming Jewels  continued

" the icosahedron and dodecahedron have the same properties
of symmetry. For the centres of the twenty faces of an icosahedron
may be joined to form a regular dodecahedron, and conversely, the
twelve vertices of an icosahedron can be placed at the centres
of the faces of a suitable dodecahedron. Thus the icosahedral and
dodecahedral groups are identical
 , and either solid may be used to
examine the nature of the group elements."

— Walter Ledermann, Introduction to the Theory
of Finite Groups
  (Oliver and Boyd, 1949, p. 93)

Salvador Dali, The Sacrament of the Last Supper

Omar Sharif and Gregory Peck in Behold a Pale Horse

Above: soccer-ball geometry.
              See also

             See as well
"In Sunlight and in Shadow."

Monday, December 29, 2014

Dodecahedron Model of PG(2,5)

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 2:28 PM

Recent posts tagged Sagan Dodecahedron 
mention an association between that Platonic
solid and the 5×5 grid. That grid, when extended
by the six points on a "line at infinity," yields
the 31 points of the finite projective plane of
order five.  

For details of how the dodecahedron serves as
a model of this projective plane (PG(2,5)), see
Polster's A Geometrical Picture Book , p. 120:

For associations of the grid with magic rather than
with Plato, see a search for 5×5 in this journal.

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Mathematics and Narrative

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 10:00 PM

Mathematics:  Galois-Plane Models.

Narrative: "The Dreaming Jewels."

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Christmas Ornaments

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:25 AM

Continued from December 25

IMAGE- Count rotational symmetries by rotating facets. Illustrated with 'Plato's Dice.'

A link from Sunday afternoon to Nov. 26, 2012,
suggests a review of one of the above structures.

The Dreaming Jewels  cover at left is taken from a review
by Jo Walton at Tor.com—

"This is a book that it’s clearly been difficult
for publishers to market. The covers have been
generally pretty awful, and also very different.
I own a 1975 Corgi SF Collectors Library
paperback that I bought new for 40p in the later
seventies. It’s purple, and it has a slightly grainy
cover, and it matches my editions of The Menace
From Earth
  and A Canticle for Leibowitz .
(Dear old Corgi SF Collectors Editions with their
very seventies fonts! How I imprinted on them at
an early age!) I mention this, however, because
the (uncredited) illustration actually represents and
illustrates the book much better than any of the other
cover pictures I’ve seen. It shows a hexagon with an
attempt at facets, a man, a woman, hands, a snake,
and stars, all in shades of green. It isn’t attractive,
but it wouldn’t put off people who’d enjoy what’s inside
either."

The "hexagon with an attempt at facets" is actually
an icosahedron, as the above diagram shows.
(The geometric part of the diagram is from a Euclid webpage.)

For Plato's dream about these jewels, see his Timaeus.

Saturday, March 30, 2013

Blackboard Jungle

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:30 AM

(Continued)

Harrowing of Hell (Catholic Encyclopedia )

"This is the Old English and Middle English term
for the triumphant descent of Christ into hell (or Hades)
between the time of His Crucifixion and His Resurrection,
when, according to Christian belief, He brought salvation
to the souls held captive there since the beginning of the world."

Through the Blackboard (Feb. 25, 2010)—

Physicist accelerated against his blackboard in 'A Serious Man'

See also The Dreaming Jewels and Colorful Tale.

Monday, November 26, 2012

“The Eight”…

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:18 PM

Meets "The Master"—

IMAGE- Joaquin Phoenix, corridor scene in 'The Master'

Today's midday NY Lottery: 333 and 5885.

"Continue a search for thirty-three and three." — The Eight  (1988)

"Make me young." — Kilgore Trout in
Breakfast of Champions . Trout was modeled after
author Theodore Sturgeon who died on 5/8/85.

(An example of Sturgeon's work: The Dreaming Jewels  (1950).)

Related illustrations from the eighth day of 2012—

See also "I'm sorry to be catechizing you like this."

Saturday, June 9, 2012

Misquoting Nietzsche

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:01 AM

Jim Holt in tomorrow’s New York Times

“Allow me to quote Nietzsche
(although I know that will be considered
by some to be in bad taste):

‘As the circle of science grows larger,
it touches paradox at more places.'”

A possible source for this misquotation—
Harvard University Press

IMAGE- Hilary Putnam misquoting Nietzsche on 'the circle of science'

A more accurate quotation—

Anyone who has ever experienced the pleasure of Socratic insight and felt how, spreading in ever-widening circles, it seeks to embrace the whole world of appearances, will never again find any stimulus toward existence more violent than the craving to complete this conquest and to weave the net impenetrably tight. To one who feels that way, the Platonic Socrates will appear as the teacher of an altogether new form of “Greek cheerfulness” and blissful affirmation of existence that seeks to discharge itself in actions— most often in maieutic and educational influences on noble youths, with a view to eventually producing a genius.

But science, spurred by its powerful illusion, speeds irresistibly towards its limits where its optimism, concealed in the essence of logic, suffers shipwreck. For the periphery of the circle of science has an infinite number of points; and while there is no telling how this circle could ever be surveyed completely, noble and gifted men nevertheless reach, e’er half their time and inevitably, such boundary points on the periphery from which one gazes into what defies illumination. When they see to their horror how logic coils up at these boundaries and finally bites its own tail— suddenly the new form of insight breaks through, tragic insight  which, merely to be endured, needs art as a protection and remedy.

— Friedrich Nietzsche, The Birth of Tragedy , translated by Walter Kaufmann (Modern Library)

Thursday, June 7, 2012

Trinity Riddle

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:00 PM

IMAGE- Raven's Progressive Matrices problem, Bertrand Russell, the Mad Hatter, and the Hatter's riddle

Click image for some background.

Thursday, May 31, 2012

Matrix Problem

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:20 PM

IMAGE- Charlize Theron as Ravenna with raven in poster for 'Snow White and the Huntsman'

Poster from Walpurgisnacht 2012

Raven’s Progressive Matrices problem:

IMAGE- Raven's Progressive Matrices problem based on triangular quarter- and half-diamonds

Click the problem for a related story.

For some related geometry, see Elements Diamond.
See also a post (Dream Time, May 3, 2010)
about geometry and an earlier Walpurgisnacht.

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Digital Theology

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:20 AM

See also remarks on Digital Space and Digital Time in this journal.

Such remarks can, of course, easily verge on crackpot territory.

For some related  pure  mathematics, see Symmetry of Walsh Functions.

Monday, November 21, 2011

Transition

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:00 PM

A search for images related to Joseph T. Clark, Society of Jesus,
(author* of a quote in today's noon entry) yields—

The Jewel in Venn's Lotus

(Click to enlarge.)

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111121-ClarkSearch-500w.jpg

"Heaven, I'm in heaven" — First words of "Purple Rose of Cairo"

* Very likely the same Joseph T. Clark, S. J. (1911-1989) who taught at Canisius College.

Monday, May 3, 2010

Dream Time

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 AM

“Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world”

William Butler Yeats

From a document linked to here on April 30, Walpurgisnacht–

“…the Golden Age, or Dream Time, is remote only from the rational mind. It is not accessible to euclidean reason….”

“The utopia of the Grand Inquisitor ‘is the product of “the euclidean mind” (a phrase Dostoyevsky often used)….'”

“The purer, the more euclidean the reason that builds a utopia, the greater is its self-destructive capacity. I submit that our lack of faith in the benevolence of reason as the controlling power is well founded. We must test and trust our reason, but to have faith  in it is to elevate it to godhead.”

“Utopia has been euclidean, it has been European, and it has been masculine. I am trying to suggest, in an evasive, distrustful, untrustworthy fashion, and as obscurely as I can, that our final loss of faith in that radiant sandcastle may enable our eyes to adjust to a dimmer light and in it perceive another kind of utopia.”

“You will recall that the quality of static perfection is an essential element of the non-inhabitability of the euclidean utopia….”

“The euclidean utopia is mapped; it is geometrically organized, with the parts labeled….”

— Ursula K. Le Guin, “A Non-Euclidean View of California as a Cold Place to Be”

San Francisco Chronicle  today

“A May Day rally in Santa Cruz erupted into chaos Saturday night….”

“Had Goodman Brown fallen asleep in the forest,
and only dreamed a wild dream of a witch-meeting?”

Nathaniel Hawthorne

Friday, February 19, 2010

Requiem for a Wizard*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:20 AM

In memory of
Susanna Kaysen's father,
who died on February 8–

Images from March 3, 2004:


The Jewel
in Venn's Lotus

and

El Pato-lógico and a

Dream of Heaven

* The title of the 2004 post containing these images is "Deep Play." For some notion of the depth of the play "The Life of Carl Kaysen," see "The Kaysen Memos," pp. 271-278 in James Carroll's House of War  (1st ed. May 16, 2006).

Friday, February 5, 2010

The Great Brown

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 PM

Today's New York Times on a current theatrical presentation of The Great Gatsby

"Throughout the show, the relationship between what is read and its context keeps shifting, with the real world finally giving way entirely to the fictive one."

Owl Eyes in The Great Gatsby

"This fella's a regular Belasco."

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10/100204-DavidBrownSm.jpg

David Brown, producer. Brown died on Monday.

From The Diamond as Big as the Monster in this journal on Dec. 21, 2005–

"At the still point, there the dance is.” –T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets

Eliot was quoted in the epigraph to the chapter on automorphism groups in Parallelisms of Complete Designs, by Peter J. Cameron, published when Cameron was at Merton College, Oxford.

“As Gatsby closed the door of ‘the Merton College Library’ I could have sworn I heard the owl-eyed man break into ghostly laughter.” –F. Scott Fitzgerald

Related material: Yesterday's posts and the jewel in Venn's lotus.

Thursday, January 28, 2010

The Door into Summertime

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:29 AM

This journal on Aug. 17, 2008:

TIME photo of preacher Rick Warren embracing the Republican candidate (on his right) and the Democratic candidate (on his left)

That post linked to an earlier post illustrating
the triangle formed by Harvard, by the
Mystic River at Somerville, and
by Bunker Hill Community College–

Triangulation illustrated by Harvard, by Mystic River, and by Bunker Hill Community College

That post also linked to the Wikipedia article
Triangulation, which now states that
"Some members of the U.S. Democratic
Party, in particular the left, insist that
triangulation is 'dead.'"

Perhaps. Click the image below
for some background.

The Mystic Eye of Somerville, with the late Howard Zinn and the late Louis Auchincloss-- 'The eye you see him with is the same eye with which he sees you'-- Father Egan

For a view of Somerville from Harvard for Zinn,
see May 31, 2006. For a view of Summertime
for Auchincloss, see the NY Times obituary
of a political figure who died on Sunday.

On that day, this journal pictured a different
 metaphor from Robert Stone's Father Egan
the jewel in the lotus

The Jewel in Venn's Lotus (photo by Gerry Gantt)

Euclid's classic construction
of the equilateral triangle
offers a different view of
the jewel in Venn's lotus

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070701-Ratio.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

For a more poetic approach to
this metaphor, see Log24 on
another Sunday– July 1, 2007.

Happy birthday, Rick Warren.

Sunday, January 24, 2010

Today’s Sermon

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:00 AM

More Than Matter

Wheel in Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, 1913

(f) Poetry

The burden or refrain of a song.

⇒ "This meaning has a low degree of authority, but is supposed from the context in the few cases where the word is found." Nares.

You must sing a-down a-down, An you call him a-down-a. O, how the wheel becomes it! Shak.

"In one or other of G. F. H. Shadbold's two published notebooks, Beyond Narcissus and Reticences of Thersites, a short entry appears as to the likelihood of Ophelia's enigmatic cry: 'Oh, how the wheel becomes it!' referring to the chorus or burden 'a-down, a-down' in the ballad quoted by her a moment before, the aptness she sees in the refrain."

— First words of Anthony Powell's novel "O, How the Wheel Becomes It!" (See Library Thing.)

Anthony Powell's 'O, How the Wheel Becomes It!' along with Laertes' comment 'This nothing's more than matter.'

Related material:

Photo uploaded on January 14, 2009
with caption "This nothing's more than matter"

and the following nothings from this journal
on the same date– Jan. 14, 2009

The Fritz Leiber 'Spider' symbol in a square

A Singer 7-cycle in the Galois field with eight elements

The Eightfold (2x2x2) Cube

The Jewel in Venn's Lotus (photo by Gerry Gantt)

 

Thursday, July 16, 2009

Thursday July 16, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:00 PM
 
Mother of Beauty
continued from
April 7, 2004

In memory of Julius Shulman,
architectural photographer,
who died last night:

"And the lotos rose, quietly, quietly,
  The surface glittered out of heart of light…"

Four Quartets, quoted here
November 22, 2004

Photo by Gerry Gantt, and the Jewel in Venn's Lotus

"… as in the hearth and heart of light." 

Delmore Schwartz   

(See previous entry.)

Wednesday, January 14, 2009

Wednesday January 14, 2009

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:45 AM
Eight is a Gate

'The Eight,' by Katherine Neville

Customer reviews of Neville's 'The Eight'

From the most highly
rated negative review:

“I never did figure out
what ‘The Eight’ was.”

Various approaches
to this concept
(click images for details):

The Fritz Leiber 'Spider' symbol in a square

A Singer 7-cycle in the Galois field with eight elements

The Eightfold (2x2x2) Cube

The Jewel in Venn's Lotus (photo by Gerry Gantt)

Tom O'Horgan in his loft. O'Horgan died Sunday, Jan. 11, 2009.

Bach, Canon 14, BWV 1087

Wednesday, March 3, 2004

Wednesday March 3, 2004

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:00 PM

Deep Play

In the previous entry, there was a reference to Carl Kaysen, former director of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton and father of Susanna Kaysen, author of Girl, Interrupted.

A search for further information on Carl Kaysen led to

Mark Turner, Cognitive Dimensions of Social Science: The Way We Think About Politics, Economics, Law, and Society, Oxford University Press, 2001.  For a draft of this work, click here.

Turner's book describes thought and culture in terms of what he calls "blends."  It includes a meditation on

Clifford Geertz, "Deep Play: Notes on the Balinese Cockfight," in Dædalus, Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, issue entitled, "Myth, Symbol, and Culture," Winter 1972, volume 101, number 1

That Turner bases weighty ruminations of what he is pleased to call "social science" on the properties of cockfights suggests that the academic world is, in some respects, even more bizarre than the mental hospital described by Kaysen's daughter.

Still, Turner's concept of "blends" is not without interest.

Here is a blend based on a diagram of the fields in which Turner and Kaysen père labor:

"politics, economics,
law, and society" (Turner)

and "economics, sociology,
politics and law" (Kaysen).

In the previous entry we abstracted from the nature of these academic pursuits, representing them simply as sets in a Venn diagram.  This led to the following religious icon, an example of a Turner "blend" —


The Jewel
in Venn's Lotus.

Here is another "blend," related both to the religious material in the previous entry and to Geertz's influential essay.

From my entry for
St. Patrick's Day, 2003
:

Summa Theologica

How can you tell there's an Irishman
present at a cockfight?
He enters a duck.
How can you tell a Pole is present?
He bets on the duck.
How can you tell an Italian is present?
The duck wins.

(Source: Blanche Knott,
Truly Tasteless Jokes)

Illustration for the entries
of Oct. 27, 2003:

El Pato-lógico and a

"dream of heaven."

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