Log24

Thursday, March 29, 2018

Asymmetry: An Historical YA Fantasy

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:48 AM

Or:  The Discreet Charm of Stéphane

For Lisa Halliday

Supplementary images —

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

On Unfairly Excluding Asymmetry

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:28 AM

A comment on the the Diamond Theorem Facebook page



Those who enjoy asymmetry may consult the "Expert's Cube" —

For further details see the previous post.

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Compare and Contrast

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 4:28 PM

Weyl on symmetry, the eightfold cube, the Fano plane, and trigrams of the I Ching

Related material on automorphism groups —

The "Eightfold Cube" structure shown above with Weyl
competes rather directly with the "Eightfold Way" sculpture 
shown above with Bryant. The structure and the sculpture
each illustrate Klein's order-168 simple group.

Perhaps in part because of this competition, fans of the Mathematical
Sciences Research Institute (MSRI, pronounced "Misery') are less likely
to enjoy, and discuss, the eight-cube mathematical structure  above
than they are an eight-cube mechanical puzzle  like the one below.

Note also the earlier (2006) "Design Cube 2x2x2" webpage
illustrating graphic designs on the eightfold cube. This is visually,
if not mathematically, related to the (2010) "Expert's Cube."

Saturday, May 22, 2010

In the Details

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:31 AM

Today's New York Times

Byzantine

"…there were fresh questions about whether the intelligence overhaul that created the post of national intelligence director was fatally flawed, and whether Mr. Obama would move gradually to further weaken the authorities granted to the director and give additional power to individual spy agencies like the Central Intelligence Agency. Mr. Blair and each of his predecessors have lamented openly that the intelligence director does not have enough power to deliver the intended shock therapy to America’s byzantine spying apparatus."

Catch-22 in Doonesbury today—

Image-- Chaplain and doctor in Doonesbury

From Log24 on Jan. 5, 2010—
   Artifice of Eternity

A Medal

In memory of Byzantine scholar Ihor Sevcenko,
who died at 87 on St. Stephen's Day, 2009–

Image-- Cross-in-circle design based on figure in Weyl's 'Symmetry'

Thie above image results from a Byzantine
meditation based on a detail in the previous post

Image-- 'Lyche Gate' with asterisk, from Google Books, digitized April 24, 2008

 

Image-- The Case of the Lyche Gate Asterisk

"This might be a good time to
call it a day." –Today's Doonesbury

"TOMORROW ALWAYS BELONGS TO US"
Title of an exhibition by young Nordic artists
in Sweden during the summer of 2008.

The exhibition included, notably, Josefine Lyche.

Tuesday, January 5, 2010

Artifice of Eternity

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:59 AM

A Medal

In memory of Byzantine scholar Ihor Sevcenko,
who died at 87 on St. Stephen's Day, 2009–

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060915-Roots.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

William Grimes on Sevcenko in this morning's New York Times:

"Perhaps his most fascinating, if uncharacteristic, literary contribution came shortly after World War II, when he worked with Ukrainians stranded in camps in Germany for displaced persons.

In April 1946 he sent a letter to Orwell, asking his permission to translate 'Animal Farm' into Ukrainian for distribution in the camps. The idea instantly appealed to Orwell, who not only refused to accept any royalties but later agreed to write a preface for the edition. It remains his most detailed, searching discussion of the book."

See also a rather different medal discussed
here in the context of an Orwellian headline from
The New York Times on Christmas morning,
the day before Sevcenko died.
That headline, at the top of the online front page,
was "Arthur Koestler, Man of Darkness."

Leibniz, design for medallion showing binary numbers as an 'imago creationis'

The medal, offered as an example of brightness
to counteract the darkness of the Times, was designed
by Leibniz in honor of his discovery of binary arithmetic.
See Brightness at Noon and Brightness continued.

"By groping toward the light we are made to realize
how deep the darkness is around us."
— Arthur Koestler, The Call Girls: A Tragi-Comedy,
Random House, 1973, page 118

Monday, November 20, 2006

Monday November 20, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:20 PM

Triumphs

Yesterday's link to a Log24 entry for the Feast of the Triumph of the Cross led to the following figure:
 

Primitive roots modulo 17
(Based on Weyl's Symmetry)

Today, an entry in the The New Criterion's weblog tells of Hilton Kramer's new collection of essays on art, The Triumph of Modernism.

From a Booklist review:

Kramer "celebrates the revelations of modern art, defining modernism as nothing less than 'the discipline of truthfulness, the rigor of honesty.'"

Further background: Kramer opposes

"willed frivolity and politicized vulgarization as fashionable enemies of high culture as represented in the recent past by the integrity of modernism."

 

— "25 Years of The New Criterion"

Perhaps Kramer would agree that such integrity is exemplified by "Two Giants" of modernism described by Roberta Smith in The New York Times recently (Nov. 3– birthdate of A. B. Coble, an artist of a different kind). She is reviewing an exhibit, ''Albers and Moholy-Nagy: From the Bauhaus to the New World,'' that continues through Jan. 21 at the Whitney Museum of American Art,

945 Madison Avenue: '945' as an 'artist's signature'

 945
Madison Avenue.

This instance of the number 945 as an "artists' signature" is perhaps more impressive than the instances cited in yesterday's Log24 entry, Signature.
 

Thursday, September 14, 2006

Thursday September 14, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:11 PM
Today is the Feast of the
Triumph of the Cross

Primitive roots modulo 17
(Based on Weyl's Symmetry)

and the birthday of
an expert on primitive roots,
the late I. M. Vinogradov.

Elements of Number Theory, by Vinogradov

Happy birthday.

Click on pictures
for further details.
 

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