Log24

Saturday, May 18, 2019

Cave Shadows

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:22 PM

Brighton Rock: Emerging from Plato's Cave

Friday, June 14, 2013

Amy’s Shadow

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:18 PM

Why knows what evil lurks…? — The Shadow

Backstory: "Amy Adams" + Shadow in this journal.

Related material —

Amy Adams as Lois Lane:

In the new Amy Adams version, Superman's Smallville mom
is played by Diane  Lane.

Lane also played George Reeves's sugar mommy
in the 2006 film Hollywoodland .

Ben Affleck and Diane Lane at the 2006 Venice Film Festival
premiere of  Hollywoodland :

See, too, today's previous post, and Amy Adams as Lacey Yeager
in the yet-to-be-made film version of An Object of Beauty .

Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Shadow Play

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:06 PM

       http://www.log24.com/log/pix09A/091109-Nicole.jpg

Click images for some background.

Sunday, May 19, 2019

Poem

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:36 PM

"The technical aspects
Were carefully planned,
And the social aspect
Just happened."

Robert Fano

Monday, September 4, 2017

Perspective

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:12 AM

Cover design by Jarrod Taylor.
Book published on July 14, 2015.

For this journal on that date, see posts tagged Perspective.

Night at the Museum

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:35 AM

Sunday, September 3, 2017

Dead Poet

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 6:48 PM

The time is from
a screenshot 
of my RSS feed.

"All in good time."

(See this morning's
  Mosaic Logic.)

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Plato’s Cave (continued)

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

Brighton Rock: Emerging from Plato's Cave

Tombstone

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:44 PM

The black rectangle at the end of Example 1.4
is known as the "end-of-proof symbol," "Halmos,"
or "tombstone."

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

New Horizons

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:15 PM

"We have the answer to all your fears
It's short, it's simple, it's crystal clear"

See as well last night's Midnight Review.

Midnight Review

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 AM

The Space of Horizons

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Go Set a Structure

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 2:45 PM

Friday, January 25, 2013

Public/Private

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

"I decided that there was a public Elise
and a private Elise, and they're not necessarily
the same person." — Amy Adams interview
on the 2005 film "Standing Still"

A division between public and private, from
"Standing Still"—

IMAGE- The perception of doors in 'Standing Still'

User review at IMDb:

"This movie reminded me of The Big Chill
(which I also loved)…."

See, too, a different door and a different Elise
in a post from Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2013

Also from that post—

"By recalling the past and freezing the present
he could open the gates of time…."

— Mark Helprin, In Sunlight and in Shadow

Thursday, January 24, 2013

Under Covers

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:06 PM

For Amy Adams and Trudie Styler:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101027-LangerSymbolicLogic.jpg

Click each cover for some background. See also

Sunday, September 16, 2012

Master Class

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:00 AM

Wikipedia (links added)—

"Hubbard coined Dianetics  from the Greek stems dia ,
meaning through, and nous , meaning mind."

Log24 on August 30

"The snow kept falling on the world,
big white flakes like white gloves."

— Frederick Seidel, "House Master,"
poem in The New Yorker  of Sept. 3, 2012

Detail of Aug. 30 illustration, with added arrow—

IMAGE- Detail of large 'Search for the Lost Tesseract' image with Amy Adams, Richard Zanuck, 'snowflake' structure, and white gloves

  The part of the illustration at upper right is from a post of
  Friday, July 13th, 2012, on the death of producer Richard Zanuck.

  "Pay no attention to the shadow behind the curtain."

Monday, December 19, 2011

X Marks a Spot

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:30 AM

(Where Entertainment is God, continued)

IMAGE- LA Times on Korean transition and Galaxy Nexus

Related material— The Nexus (Jan. 8, 2010).

That post contains the following—

"A Nexus is a place equidistant from the five elements as explained in the TV series Charmed . Using this as a point of reference, it is quite possible that there could be several Nexus points of power scattered throughout the world, though rare."

Nexus (Charmed) in Wikipedia

Happy birthday, Alyssa Milano.

Bumped

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:22 AM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111219-Bumped-NYTobits1AM.jpg


Related material— Hitchens on Heaven—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111219-HitchensOnHeaven.jpg

Sunday, December 18, 2011

Dateline Seoul

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 PM

For those who prefer their news straight

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111218-SeoulNews.jpg

Happy birthday, Steven Spielberg.

Transition

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:25 PM

"Vaclav Havel oversaw a bumpy transition…." —New York Times  today

"Is it over— or is it just beginning?" —"All About Eve"

Vets Club

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:13 PM

Continued from August 16

http://www.log24.com/log11/saved/111218-NYTobits102PM-360w.jpg

Closure

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Christopher Hitchens on J. K. Rowling—

“We must not let in daylight upon magic,” as Walter Bagehot remarked in another connection, and the wish to have everything clarified is eventually self-defeating in its own terms. In her correct determination to bring down the curtain decisively, Rowling has gone further than she should, and given us not so much a happy ending as an ending which suggests that evil has actually been defeated (you should forgive the expression) for good.

Greater authors— Arthur Conan Doyle most notably— have been in the same dilemma when seeking closure. And, like Conan Doyle, Rowling has won imperishable renown for giving us an identifiable hero and a fine caricature of a villain, and for making a fictional bit of King’s Cross station as luminous as a certain address on nearby Baker Street. It is given to few authors to create a world apart, and to populate it as well as illustrate it in the mind.

"A fictional bit of King's Cross Station"—

Throughout the series, Harry has traveled to King's Cross Station, either to depart for Hogwarts or return to London on the Hogwarts Express. The station has always symbolized the crossroad between the Muggle world and the Wizarding realm and Harry's constant shuffling between, and his conflict with, the two extremes. As Harry now finds himself at a transition point between life and death, it is purely to be expected that he would see it within his own mind as a simulacrum of that station. And though Dumbledore assures Harry that he (Harry) is not actually dead, it seems Harry can choose that option if he so wishes. Harry has literally and figuratively been stripped bare, and must decide either to board a train that will transport him to the "other side", or return to the living world…. — Wikibooks.org

Saturday, December 17, 2011

Lining the Train

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:30 PM

IMAGE- Wilfred Owen, 'faces grimly gay' in 'The Send-Off'

See also Thursday morning's "As Is."

Friday, December 16, 2011

Take Your Pick

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:31 PM

Two recent quotes in this journal—

December 14

"Hoban once ruefully observed that death would be a good career move:
'People will say, "Yes, Hoban, he seems an interesting writer, let’s look at him again."'"

December 15

"This poem is concerned with language on a very plain level."

— "Paradoxes and Oxymorons" in Shadow Train

Michael Kinsley in The New York Times  on Sunday, May 13, 2007

Kinsley on the career of Christopher Hitchens—

Interesting! …. Interesting!! …. Interesting!!! …. Interesting!!!!

Where was this train heading?

Kinsley on a book in which Hitchens …

… pronounces the movie “It’s a Wonderful Life” “engaging but abysmal” (a typical Hitchens aside: cleverly paradoxical? witlessly oxymoronic? take your pick)….

Midnight in LA

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:00 AM

The Sherlock Holmes film "A Game of Shadows"
is apparently showing around midnight
(12:00 AM PST, 3:00 AM EST) tonight in LA
at the ArcLight Hollywood.

IMAGE- A Jesuit on words and shadows

This passage was quoted here on Sunday, November 27, this year.

For other words related to that date, see tonight's 11:02 post.

The serpent's eyes shine
As he wraps around the vine
In the Garden of Allah

— Don Henley

Friday

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:56 AM

"Just the facts." — Attributed to Joe Friday

A search in this journal in honor of the late
Christopher Hitchens yields links to two of his reviews—
a review of the author of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo  and
a review of a work by a rather different author—

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows .

Thursday, December 15, 2011

As Is

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:56 AM

What "As" Is —

Image- The Three-Point Line: A Finite Projective Geometry

"This poem is concerned with language on a very plain level."

Shadow Train

"You got to ride it like you find it."
Song lyric

Related entertainment —

IMAGE- Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows

Tuesday, July 6, 2010

What “As” Is

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 8:00 PM

or:  Combinatorics (Rota) as Philosophy (Heidegger) as Geometry (Me)

"Dasein’s full existential structure is constituted by
the 'as-structure' or 'well-joined structure' of the rift-design*…"

— Gary Williams, post of January 22, 2010

Background—

Gian-Carlo Rota on Heidegger…

"… The universal as  is given various names in Heidegger's writings….

The discovery of the universal as  is Heidegger's contribution to philosophy….

The universal 'as' is the surgence of sense in Man, the shepherd of Being.

The disclosure of the primordial as  is the end of a search that began with Plato….
This search comes to its conclusion with Heidegger."

— "Three Senses of 'A is B' in Heideggger," Ch. 17 in Indiscrete Thoughts

… and projective points as separating rifts

Image-- The Three-Point Line: A
 Finite Projective Space

    Click image for details.

* rift-design— Definition by Deborah Levitt

"Rift.  The stroke or rending by which a world worlds, opening both the 'old' world and the self-concealing earth to the possibility of a new world. As well as being this stroke, the rift is the site— the furrow or crack— created by the stroke. As the 'rift design' it is the particular characteristics or traits of this furrow."

— "Heidegger and the Theater of Truth," in Tympanum: A Journal of Comparative Literary Studies, Vol. 1, 1998

Thursday, September 24, 2009

Thursday September 24, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:01 AM

Who Knows
What Evil Lurks…

The brain-in-a-jar on the cover of the new Pearl Jam album “Backspacer” (previous two entries) is apparently there because of a song on the album, “Unthought Known“–

“All the thoughts you never see
You are always thinking
Brain is wide, the brain is deep
Oh, are you sinking?”

The song title is from a book, The Shadow of the Object (Columbia U. Press, 1987), by psychoanalyst Christopher Bollas.

The “unthought known” phrase has been quoted widely by second-rate psychologizers and by some not so second-rate. Their lucubrations suggest that sinking brain-worshippers should seek a…

Amy Adams and Meryl Streep ('Doubt') as Catholic psychoanalysts, with their couch

The couch is from a 2002 exhibit
at London’s White Cube gallery.

Monday, October 20, 2008

Monday October 20, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:06 AM
Me and My Shadow

Thoughts suggested by Saturday's entry–

"… with primitives the beginnings of art, science, and religion coalesce in the undifferentiated chaos of the magical mentality…."

— Carl G. Jung, "On the Relation of Analytical Psychology to Poetry," Collected Works, Vol. 15, The Spirit in Man, Art, and Literature, Princeton University Press, 1966, excerpted in Twentieth Century Theories of Art, edited by James M. Thompson.

For a video of such undifferentiated chaos, see the Four Tops' "Loco in Acapulco."

"Yes, you'll be goin' loco
  down in Acapulco,

  the magic down there
  is so strong."

This song is from the 1988 film "Buster."

(For a related religious use of that name– "Look, Buster, do you want to live?"– see Fritz Leiber's "Damnation Morning," quoted here on Sept. 28.)

Art, science, and religion are not apparent within the undifferentiated chaos of the Four Tops' Acapulco video, which appears to incorporate time travel in its cross-cutting of scenes that seem to be from the Mexican revolution with contemporary pool-party scenes. Art, science, and religion do, however, appear within my own memories of Acapulco. While staying at a small thatched-roof hostel on a beach at Acapulco in the early 1960's, I read a paperback edition of Three Philosophical Poets, a book by George Santayana on Lucretius, Dante, and Goethe. Here we may regard art as represented by Goethe, science by Lucretius, and religion by Dante. For a more recent and personal combination of these topics, see Juneteenth through Midsummer Night, 2007, which also has references to the "primitives" and "magical mentality" discussed by Jung.

"The major structures of the psyche for Jung include the ego, which is comprised of the persona and the shadow. The persona is the 'mask' which the person presents [to] the world, while the shadow holds the parts of the self which the person feels ashamed and guilty about."

— Brent Dean Robbins, Jung page at Mythos & Logos

As for shame and guilt, see Malcolm Lowry's classic Under the Volcano, a novel dealing not with Acapulco but with a part of Mexico where in my youth I spent much more time– Cuernavaca.

Lest Lowry's reflections prove too depressing, I recommend as background music the jazz piano of the late Dave McKenna… in particular, "Me and My Shadow."

McKenna died on Saturday, the date of the entry that included "Loco in Acapulco." Saturday was also the Feast of Saint Luke.
 

Thursday, May 1, 2008

Thursday May 1, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM
Back from
the Shadows

C. G. Jung on cover of 'Memories, Dreams, Reflections'

 

                        "I sat upon the shore  
Fishing, with the arid plain behind me"

The Waste Land, lines 423-424

Eliot's note on line 424 —

"V. Weston, From Ritual to Romance;
chapter on the Fisher King."

 

From Ritual to Romance,
by Jessie L. Weston,
Cambridge University Press, 1920,
 Chapter IX, "The Fisher King"–

"So far as the present state of our knowledge goes we can affirm with certainty that the Fish is a Life symbol of immemorial antiquity, and the title of Fisher has, from the earliest ages, been associated with Deities who were held to be specially connected with the origin and preservation of Life."

Weston quotes a writer she does not name* who says that "the Fish was sacred to those deities who were supposed to lead men back from the shadows of death to life."

* The Open Court, June and July 1911, p. 168

 

Today's Doonesbury
   (a flashback) —

Doonesbury of May 1, 2008: Flashback to Uncle Duke on the leader of Berzerkistan

"Some days it went so well that you could make the country so that you could walk into it through the timber to come out into the clearing and work up onto the high ground and see the hills beyond the arm of the lake."
 

— Ernest Hemingway,
 A Moveable Feast

Hemingway on the cover of LIFE magazine, 1961


Selah.
 

Monday, January 10, 2005

Monday January 10, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Realism

In memory of Humphrey Carpenter:

"Aslan's last words come at the end of The Last Battle: 'There was a real railway accident […] Your father and mother and all of you are–as you used to call it in the Shadow-Lands–dead. The term is over: the holidays have begun. The dream is ended: this is the morning.' The final paragraph of the novel, which follows these words, functions as a coda; it is full of the conventions which signal the wrapping up of a story. This direct speech is the true climax of the Chronicles. Aslan is given the last word in these quiet but emphatic lines. He is the ultimate arbiter of reality: 'There was a real railway accident.' Plato, in addition to the Christian tradition, lies behind the closing chapters of The Last Battle….

'It's all in Plato, all in Plato: bless me, what do they teach them at these schools!' "

Joy Alexander, Aslan's Speech

See also From Tate to Plato (Nov. 19, 2004), Habeas Corpus (Nov. 24, 2004), and the Log24 entries of last Friday through Sunday.




 
"There was a real railway accident."

Saturday, August 9, 2003

Saturday August 9, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:07 PM

Beware of…
Jews Peddling Stories:

An episode in the ongoing saga of the conflict between the "story theory of truth" and the "diamond theory of truth."

The following set of pictures summarizes some reflections on truth and reality suggested by the August 9, 2003, New York Times obituary of writer William Woolfolk, who died on July 20, 2003.

Woolfolk was the author of The Sex Goddess and was involved in the production of the comic book series The Spirit (see below).

The central strategy of the three Semitic religions — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — is to pretend that we are all characters in a story whose author is God.  This strategy suggests the following Trinity, based on the work of William Woolfolk (The Sex Goddess and The Spirit) and Steven Spielberg ("Catch Me If You Can").  Like other Semitic tales, the story of this Trinity should not be taken too seriously.

 

William Woolfolk
Woolfolk as
a Jewish God

The Sex Goddess
Woolfolk's Story

 

Martin Sheen in Catch Me If You Can
The Father as
a Lutheran God

 

Amy Adams in Catch Me If You Can
The Father's
Story

DiCaprio as a doctor
The Son

DiCaprio and Adams
The Son's Story

Amy Adams, star of Catch Me If You Can
The Holy
Spirit

The Spirit, 1942
The Holy
Spirit's Story

 

A Confession of Faith:

Theology Based On the Film
"Catch Me If You Can":

The Son to God the Lutheran Father:

"I'm nothing really, just a kid in love with your daughter."

This is taken from a review of "Catch Me If You Can" by Thomas S. Hibbs.

For some philosophical background to this confession, see Hibbs's book

Shows About Nothing:
Nihilism in Popular Culture
from The Exorcist to Seinfeld
.

By the way, today is the anniversary of the dropping on Nagasaki
of a made-in-USA Weapon of Mass Destruction, a plutonium bomb
affectionately named Fat Man.

Fat Man was a sequel to an earlier Jewish story,

Trinity.

Sunday, July 13, 2003

Sunday July 13, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 5:09 PM

ART WARS, 5:09

The Word in the Desert

For Harrison Ford in the desert.
(See previous entry.)

    Words strain,
Crack and sometimes break,
    under the burden,
Under the tension, slip, slide, perish,
Will not stay still. Shrieking voices
Scolding, mocking, or merely chattering,
Always assail them.
    The Word in the desert
Is most attacked by voices of temptation,
The crying shadow in the funeral dance,
The loud lament of
    the disconsolate chimera.

— T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets

The link to the word "devilish" in the last entry leads to one of my previous journal entries, "A Mass for Lucero," that deals with the devilishness of postmodern philosophy.  To hammer this point home, here is an attack on college English departments that begins as follows:

"William Faulkner's Snopes trilogy, which recounts the generation-long rise of the drily loathsome Flem Snopes from clerk in a country store to bank president in Jefferson, Mississippi, teems with analogies to what has happened to English departments over the past thirty years."

For more, see

The Word in the Desert,
by Glenn C. Arbery
.

See also the link on the word "contemptible," applied to Jacques Derrida, in my Logos and Logic page.

This leads to an National Review essay on Derrida,

The Philosopher as King,
by Mark Goldblatt

A reader's comment on my previous entry suggests the film "Scotland, PA" as viewing related to the Derrida/Macbeth link there.

I prefer the following notice of a 7-11 death, that of a powerful art museum curator who would have been well cast as Lady Macbeth:

Die Fahne Hoch,
Frank Stella,
1959


Dorothy Miller,
MOMA curator,

died at 99 on
July 11, 2003
.

From the Whitney Museum site:

"Max Anderson: When artist Frank Stella first showed this painting at The Museum of Modern Art in 1959, people were baffled by its austerity. Stella responded, 'What you see is what you see. Painting to me is a brush in a bucket and you put it on a surface. There is no other reality for me than that.' He wanted to create work that was methodical, intellectual, and passionless. To some, it seemed to be nothing more than a repudiation of everything that had come before—a rational system devoid of pleasure and personality. But other viewers saw that the black paintings generated an aura of mystery and solemnity.

The title of this work, Die Fahne Hoch, literally means 'The banner raised.'  It comes from the marching anthem of the Nazi youth organization. Stella pointed out that the proportions of this canvas are much the same as the large flags displayed by the Nazis.

But the content of the work makes no reference to anything outside of the painting itself. The pattern was deduced from the shape of the canvas—the width of the black bands is determined by the width of the stretcher bars. The white lines that separate the broad bands of black are created by the narrow areas of unpainted canvas. Stella's black paintings greatly influenced the development of Minimalism in the 1960s."

From Play It As It Lays:

   She took his hand and held it.  "Why are you here."
   "Because you and I, we know something.  Because we've been out there where nothing is.  Because I wanted—you know why."
   "Lie down here," she said after a while.  "Just go to sleep."
   When he lay down beside her the Seconal capsules rolled on the sheet.  In the bar across the road somebody punched King of the Road on the jukebox again, and there was an argument outside, and the sound of a bottle breaking.  Maria held onto BZ's hand.
   "Listen to that," he said.  "Try to think about having enough left to break a bottle over it."
   "It would be very pretty," Maria said.  "Go to sleep."

I smoke old stogies I have found…    

Cigar Aficionado on artist Frank Stella:

" 'Frank actually makes the moment. He captures it and helps to define it.'

This was certainly true of Stella's 1958 New York debut. Fresh out of Princeton, he came to New York and rented a former jeweler's shop on Eldridge Street on the Lower East Side. He began using ordinary house paint to paint symmetrical black stripes on canvas. Called the Black Paintings, they are credited with paving the way for the minimal art movement of the 1960s. By the fall of 1959, Dorothy Miller of The Museum of Modern Art had chosen four of the austere pictures for inclusion in a show called Sixteen Americans."

For an even more austere picture, see

Geometry for Jews:

For more on art, Derrida, and devilishness, see Deborah Solomon's essay in the New York Times Magazine of Sunday, June 27, 1999:

 How to Succeed in Art.

"Blame Derrida and
his fellow French theorists…."

See, too, my site

Art Wars: Geometry as Conceptual Art

For those who prefer a more traditional meditation, I recommend

Ecce Lignum Crucis

("Behold the Wood of the Cross")

THE WORD IN THE DESERT

For more on the word "road" in the desert, see my "Dead Poet" entry of Epiphany 2003 (Tao means road) as well as the following scholarly bibliography of road-related cultural artifacts (a surprising number of which involve Harrison Ford):

A Bibliography of Road Materials

Wednesday, April 9, 2003

Wednesday April 9, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:25 AM

Hearts of Darkness

Today's birthdays:

Charles Baudelaire, poet, b. 1821

Leopold II, King of Belgium, b. 1835

Tom Lehrer, mathematician, b. 1928

In view of these birthdays and of yesterday's entry quoting Eliot on "the Shadow," the following trilogy of links seems appropriate:

The Lamont Cranston:

Part I   Part II   Part III

Nota bene:

Today is also the birthday of
Paul Robeson and J. William Fulbright,
shadows to respect.

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