Log24

Friday, November 4, 2016

Crimson Tales

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:16 PM

This post was suggested by

A death last Sunday and a Harvard Crimson  story today.

Related images —

From last Sunday

From an author who reportedly died on Oct. 31 (Halloween)

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Rosenhain and Göpel Revisited

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:23 AM

The authors Taormina and Wendland in the previous post
discussed some mathematics they apparently did not know was
related to a classic 1905 book by R. W. H. T. Hudson, Kummer's
Quartic Surface
.

"This famous book is a prototype for the possibility
of explaining and exploring a many-faceted topic of
research, without focussing on general definitions,
formal techniques, or even fancy machinery. In this
regard, the book still stands as a highly recommendable,
unparalleled introduction to Kummer surfaces, as a
permanent source of inspiration and, last but not least, 
as an everlasting symbol of mathematical culture."

— Werner Kleinert, Mathematical Reviews ,
     as quoted at Amazon.com

Some 4×4 diagrams from that book are highly relevant to the
discussion by Taormina and Wendland of the 4×4 squares within
the 1974 Miracle Octad Generator of R. T. Curtis that were later,
in 1987, described by Curtis as pictures of the vector 4-space over
the two-element Galois field GF(2).

Hudson did not think of his 4×4 diagrams as illustrating a vector space,
but he did use them to picture certain subsets of the 16 cells in each
diagram that he called Rosenhain and Göpel tetrads .

Some related work of my own (click images for related posts)—

Rosenhain tetrads as 20 of the 35 projective lines in PG(3,2)

IMAGE- Desargues's theorem in light of Galois geometry

Göpel tetrads as 15 of the 35 projective lines in PG(3,2)

Anticommuting Dirac matrices as spreads of projective lines

Related terminology describing the Göpel tetrads above

Ron Shaw on symplectic geometry and a linear complex in PG(3,2)

Sunday, May 15, 2016

Quarter to Three

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:45 PM
 

Hilary Swank in 'Million Dollar Baby'

O.C.D.          

The "O.C.D." does not refer to obsessive-
compulsive disorder, but to "Our Class, Dear."

Saturday, March 15, 2014

Language Game

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:00 PM

Cullinane = Cullinan + e

Greene = Green + e

Tuesday, January 8, 2013

Necessary Angel

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 9:29 AM

Old Stone-Cutter

His gravestones are his everlasting children.
He loves to get his cramped left hand around
the solid faithful feeling of his chisel
and dig the names of those below the ground

or the family names of provident ones above
who cross their fingers and defy the fates
and acknowledge death their enemy and master
by ordering headstones with their birthing dates.

He carves his holy head, a solemn cherub
with granite wings and childish eyes cast down.
Those who prefer a willowed urn, disliking
angels, can go and die in another town.

FRANCES FROST

(From The North American Review , Vol. 248, No. 2,
1939, page 301)

Solemn cherub by Albrecht Dürer in 1514

Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Mate

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 AM

(Midnight in the Garden, continued)

E is for Ending 

Cullinane = Cullinan + E

And for Everlast.

(The Cullinan link above is to a woman
who apparently is the wife of writer
Alan Cowell. See The Revisiting, Dec. 3rd.)

Monday, September 3, 2012

Hashtag E

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 5:48 AM

For Kristen

Hilary Swank in 'Million Dollar Baby'

O.C.D.          

Saturday, September 17, 2011

Themes

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 AM

"'Ain’t No Grave' is Johnny’s final studio recording. The album and its title track
deal heavily with themes of mortality, resurrection, and everlasting life.
The Johnny Cash Project pays tribute to these themes."

And  sells products!

IMAGE- Banner ad with thejohnnycashproject.com run all day Sept. 16, 2011, at NY Times

Click image to enlarge.

I prefer "And I heard, as it were, the noise of thunder."

Wednesday, May 4, 2011

To Coin a Phrase

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:00 PM

For a father figure, a post suggested by tonight's obituary of Jackie Cooper

Image thanks to Conrad H. Roth's "The E at Delphi"—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110504-TheDelphicE.PNG

Link thanks to Clint Eastwood—

E is for Everlast.

Wednesday, January 5, 2011

Roll Credits

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 PM

IMAGE- Robert Mitchum sings 'Everlasting Arms'

"What a fellowship…"

Happy birthday, Iris.

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Preforming

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Photo caption in NY Times  today— a pianist "preforming" in 1967. (See today's previous post.)

The pianist's life story seems in part to echo that of Juliette Binoche in the film "Bleu." Binoche appeared in this journal yesterday, before I had seen the pianist in today's Times  obituaries. The Binoche appearance was related to the blue diamond in the film "Duelle " (Tuesday morning's post) and the saying of Heraclitus "immortals mortal, mortals immortal" (Tuesday afternoon's post).

This somewhat uncanny echo brings to mind Nabokov

Life Everlasting—based on a misprint!
I mused as I drove homeward: take the hint,
And stop investigating my abyss?
But all at once it dawned on me that this
Was the real point, the contrapuntal theme;
Just this: not text, but texture; not the dream
But topsy-turvical coincidence,
Not flimsy nonsense, but a web of sense.

Whether sense or nonsense, the following quotation seems relevant—

"Archetypes function as living dispositions, ideas in the Platonic sense, that preform and continually influence our thoughts and feelings and actions." –C.G. Jung in Four Archetypes: Mother, Rebirth, Spirit, Trickster, the section titled "On the Concept of the Archetype."

That section is notable for its likening of Jungian archetypes to Platonic ideas and to axial systems of crystals. See also "Cubist Tune," March 18 —

 

Blue tesseract cover<br /><br />
art, blue crystals in 'Bleu,' lines from 'Blue Guitar'

Friday, February 12, 2010

Capital E

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:30 AM

Where Entertainment is God, continued

The following paragraphs are from a review by Piotr Siemion of Infinite Jest, a novel by David Foster Wallace. Illustrations have been added.

"Wallace was somehow able to twist together three yarns…. …there's a J.D Salinger for those who like J.D. Salinger. There's William Burroughs for those hardy souls who like some kick in their prose. And there's a dash of Kurt Vonnegut too. All three voices, though, are amplified in Infinite Jest beyond mere distortion and then projected onto Wallace's peculiar own three-ring circus….

Venn diagram of three sets

… there's entertainment. Make it a capital E.

Hilary Swank in 'Million Dollar Baby'

Illustration by Clint Eastwood
from Log24 post "E is for Everlast"

Infinite Jest revolves, among its many gyrations, around the story of the Entertainment, a film-like creation going by the title of 'Infinite Jest' and created shortly before his suicidal death by the young tennis star's father. The Entertainment's copies are now being disseminated clandestinely all over Wallace's funny America. Problem is, of course, that the film is too good. Anybody who gets to watch it becomes hooked instantly and craves only to watch it again, and again, and again, until the audience drops dead of exhaustion and hunger. Why eat when you're entertained by such a good movie? Wallace's premise brings you back to that apocryphal lab experiment in which rats were treated to a similar choice. When the rat pushed one button, marked FOOD, it would get a food pellet. The other button, marked FUN, would fire up an electrode rigged right into the orgasm center somewhere in the rat's cortex. Needless to add, one rat after another would drop dead from hunger, still twitching luridly and trying to finesse one last push of the button. Same thing in Wallace's story, especially that even those characters who have not seen the Entertainment yet, keep on entertaining themselves by different means."

The title of the Entertainment, "Infinite Jest," might also be applied to a BBC program featuring mathematician Peter J. Cameron. The program's actual title was "To Infinity and Beyond." It was broadcast the night of Feb. 10 (the date of this journal's previous post).

Few, however, are likely to find the Infinity program addictive. For closer approaches to Wallace's ideal Entertainment, see instead Dante (in the context of this journal's Feb. 4 posts on Cameron and the afterlife) and the BBC News.

Monday, January 19, 2009

Monday January 19, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 8:48 AM
The Return of
The Purloined Letter

“The letter acts like a signifier precisely to the extent that its function in the story does not require that its meaning be revealed.”

— Barbara Johnson, “The Frame of Reference,” an essay on a story by Poe

Sarge in Beetle Bailey 1/19/09: 'They say a picture is worth a thousand words.'


E is for Everlast:

Hilary Swank in 'Million Dollar Baby'

As for Johnson’s title,
“The Frame of Reference,”
see the window above,
Epiphany 2007, and
Church of the
Forbidden Planet.

Happy birthday,
Edgar Allan Poe.

Friday, August 3, 2007

Friday August 3, 2007

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 8:09 AM
Every Picture
Tells a Story

Tommy Makem and Ingmar Bergman in the New York Times obituaries

New York Times
online, August 3, 2007

As does Kevin Cullen

 
 "Tommy Makem was
   an Irish soul singer,
    and souls don't die."
 
— Kevin Cullen of
the Boston Globe,
 August 2, 2007     

Cullen's statement
in picture form:

 E is for Everlast
 
  Million Dollar Baby training scene

Scene from "Million Dollar Baby"

Log24 on July 30, 2005

Tuesday, November 29, 2005

Tuesday November 29, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:25 AM
The Way of the Pilgrim,
Part III:
 
For the Birthday
of C. S. Lewis

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051129-Tao.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

The Tao, Chapter I

“The Chinese… speak of a great thing (the greatest thing) called the Tao. It is the reality beyond all predicates, the abyss that was before the Creator Himself. It is Nature, it is the Way, the Road. It is the Way in which the universe goes on, the Way in which things everlastingly emerge, stilly and tranquilly, into space and time. It is also the Way which every man should tread in imitation of that cosmic and supercosmic progression, conforming all activities to that great exemplar.”

— C. S. Lewis in The Abolition of Man

“In his preface to That Hideous Strength, Lewis says the novel has a serious point that he has tried to make in this little book, The Abolition of Man.  The novel is a work of fantasy or science fiction, while Abolition is a short philosophical work about moral education, but as we shall see the two go together; we will understand either book better by having read and thought about the other.”

— Dale Nelson, Notes on The Abolition of Man

“In Epiphany Term, 1942, C.S. Lewis delivered the Riddell Memorial Lectures… in….  the University of Durham….  He delivered three lectures entitled ‘Men without Chests,’ ‘The Way,’ and ‘The Abolition of Man.’  In them he set out to attack and confute what he saw as the errors of his age. He started by quoting some fashionable lunacy from an educationalists’ textbook, from which he developed a general attack on moral subjectivism.  In his second lecture he argued against various contemporary isms, which purported to replace traditional objective morality.  His final lecture, ‘The Abolition of Man,’ which also provided the title of the book published the following year, was a sustained attack on hard-line scientific anti-humanism. The intervening fifty years have largely vindicated Lewis.”

— J. R. Lucas, The Restoration of Man

Saturday, July 30, 2005

Saturday July 30, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 10:18 AM

Born today: Hilary Swank

  E is for Everlast

  The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05A/050730-Everlast2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

"The grid is a staircase to the Universal."
— Rosalind Krauss

"To live is to defend a form."
— attributed to Hölderlin
 

Sunday, July 3, 2005

Sunday July 3, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:00 AM

Requiem

Some links for Grete Sultan, 1906-2005, a pianist who died at 99 on Sunday morning a week ago– June 26, 2005:

Album with sound clips
— The Legacy, Vol. 1

Album with Tantum Ergo
— The Legacy, Vol. 2

Tantum ergo
 sacramentum
Veneremur cernui;
Et antiquum
  documentum
Novo cedat ritui;
Praestet fides
 supplementum
Sensuum defectui.

Genitori genitoque
Laus et jubilatio,
Salus, honor,
 virtus quoque,
Sit et benedictio;
Procedenti ab
  utroque
Compar sit laudatio.

Amen.

— St. Thomas Aquinas

Faith for all
  defects supplying,
Down in adoration falling,
Lo! The Sacred Host
  we hail;
Lo! o’er ancient forms
  departing,
Newer rites of Grace prevail:
Where the feeble senses fail.
 
To The Everlasting Father
And The Son Who reigns
  on high,
With The Spirit blessed
  proceeding
Forth, from Each eternally,
Be salvation, honor, blessing,
Might and endless majesty.

Amen.

The musical version of Tantum Ergo on the second Sultan album is by composer

Tui St. George Tucker,

1924-2004.  Her Requiem apparently premiered

at Appalachian State University on April 30, 2005.

For other material on theology and Appalachian State University, see

that day’s Log24 entries

and also the April 25 entry,

Mathematical Style.

For more on music, theology, and Appalachia, see

the entries of Sunday, July 25, 2004.

Thursday, April 7, 2005

Thursday April 7, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 AM
ART WARS Toys

From Maureen Dowd’s New York Times column of June 9, 2002:

“The shape of the government is not as important as the policy of the government. If he makes the policy aggressive and pre-emptive, the president can conduct the war on terror from the National Gallery of Art.”

Last year’s suggested ART WARS toy:

     Wednesday, April 07, 2004

As a Little Child

Today’s birthdays:

Francis Ford Coppola and
Russell Crowe.

From MindfulGroup.com:

Welcome to our imaginative and inspiring toy catalog!

Today is Wednesday 7-April 2004. On this day in 30 Jesus crucified by Roman troops in Jerusalem (scholars’ estimate)

What you will discover in this site is what we have been able to find in our everlasting search for the most original, innovative, amusing and mind bending toys from around the world.

Have Fun.    

Coliseum Tell me more
Coliseum The Coliseum Builder Block System can be used to recreate the Roman Coliseum. Reenact ancient Gladiator matches and bring Ancient Rome into your home.


This year’s suggested ART WARS toy:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050407-MusicBox.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

To order, see the
Amazing Music Box & Gifts Company.

Wednesday, September 15, 2004

Wednesday September 15, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:00 PM

Shakespeare
for Rosh Hashanah

From “Walter Benjamin,
1892-1940,”
by Hannah Arendt
(Introduction to
Benjamin’s Illuminations.):

THE PEARL DIVER

Full fathom five thy father lies,
Of his bones are coral made,
Those are pearls that were his eyes.
Nothing of him that doth fade
But doth suffer a sea-change
Into something rich and strange.
THE TEMPEST, I, 2

“… we are dealing here with something which may not be unique but is certainly extremely rare: the gift of thinking poetically.

And this thinking, fed by the present, works with the ‘thought fragments’ it can wrest from the past and gather about itself.  Like a pearl diver who descends to the bottom of the sea, not to excavate the bottom and bring it to light but to pry loose the rich and the strange, the pearls and the coral in the depths, and to carry them to the surface, this thinking delves into the depths of the past– but not in order to resuscitate it the way it was and to contribute to the renewal of extinct ages. What guides this thinking is the conviction that although the living is subject to the ruin of the time, the process of decay is at the same time a process of crystallization, that in the depth of the sea, into which sinks and is dissolved what once was alive, some things ‘suffer a sea-change’ and survive in new crystallized forms and shapes that remain immune to the elements, as though they waited only for the pearl diver who one day will come down to them and bring them up into the world of the living– as ‘thought fragments,’ as something ‘rich and strange,’ and perhaps even as everlasting Urphänomene.”

For examples of everlasting Urphänomene, see Translation Plane for Rosh Hashanah and The Square Wheel; recall that on this date

“In 1935, the Nuremberg Laws deprived German Jews of their citizenship and made the swastika the official symbol of Nazi Germany.”

Today in History, the Miami Herald

(For some further reflections on square wheels, see Triumph of the Cross.)

Friday, April 9, 2004

Friday April 9, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:44 PM

We Call This Friday Good

— T. S. Eliot

Welcome to our imaginative and inspiring toy catalog!
Today is Friday 9-April 2004.
On this day in 1914
1st full color film shown
“The World, The Flesh & the Devil”
(London)
What you will discover in this site is what we have been able to find in our everlasting search for the most original, innovative, amusing and mind bending toys from around the world.

Have Fun.  

Wednesday, April 7, 2004

Wednesday April 7, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:00 PM

As a Little Child

Today’s birthdays:

Francis Ford Coppola and
Russell Crowe.

From MindfulGroup.com:

Welcome to our imaginative and inspiring toy catalog!

Today is Wednesday 7-April 2004. On this day in 30 Jesus crucified by Roman troops in Jerusalem (scholars’ estimate)

What you will discover in this site is what we have been able to find in our everlasting search for the most original, innovative, amusing and mind bending toys from around the world.

Have Fun.    

Coliseum Tell me more
Coliseum The Coliseum Builder Block System can be used to recreate the Roman Coliseum. Reenact ancient Gladiator matches and bring Ancient Rome into your home.

Monday, January 6, 2003

Monday January 6, 2003

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Dead Poet in
the
City of Angels

Lyricist Eddy Marnay died Friday, Jan. 3, 2003.
Relevant Log24.net entries:

Certain themes recur in these entries.  To describe such recurrent themes, in art and in life, those enamoured of metaphors from physics may ponder the phrase
implicate order.”

For an illustration of at least part of the
implicate order,
click here.

Another name for the implicate order is, of course, the Tao:

“The Chinese also speak of a great thing (the greatest thing) called the Tao. It is the reality beyond all predicates, the abyss that was before the Creator Himself. It is Nature, it is the Way, the Road. It is the Way in which the universe goes on, the Way in which things everlastingly emerge, stilly and tranquilly, into space and time.”

— C. S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man

Friday, September 6, 2002

Friday September 6, 2002

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 5:11 AM

Santa’s Wit

Edmund Gwenn, actor, died on September 6, 1959.

When asked if he thought dying was tough, Gwenn reportedly said,

“Yes, it’s tough, but not as tough as doing comedy.”

This may or may not be true; if it is, Gwenn may be the true source of a quotation variously attributed to Edmund Kean, Edwin Booth, David GarrickDonald WolfitWilliam Holden, and Groucho Marx, Marcel Marceau, Noel Coward, and Oscar Wilde:  

“Dying is easy. Comedy is hard.”

A very dubious version of the Gwenn story attributes the “comedy is hard” part to Jack Lemmon:

The lesson is best illustrated in a story involving Jack Lemmon, whose best work was in comedy. He visited the British actor Edmund Gwenn, suffering in a hospital. Gwenn is said to have lifted the flap on the oxygen tent and said, ”It’s really tough to die.” And Lemmon responded, ”It’s not as tough as doing comedy.”
— Elvis Mitchell in The New York Times Week in Review, Sunday, August 25, 2002

David Bruce, an English instructor at Ohio University, supplies another version of the Gwenn story, from Movie Anecdotes, by Peter Hay. New York: Oxford University Press, 1990:

Edmund Gwenn won an Oscar playing Santa Claus in the movie Miracle on 34 Street. As he lay dying, Jack Lemmon visited him and asked if dying was dead. [sic]  Gwenn replied, “Oh, it’s hard, very hard indeed. But not as hard as doing comedy.”

Santa might appreciate the above misprint, as would Vladimir Nabokov

“Life Everlasting–based on a misprint!”
Pale Fire 

and John Donne

“And death shall be no more, Death, thou shalt die.”
Holy Sonnets

Powered by WordPress