Log24

Friday, January 15, 2016

Enter Raven

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:45 AM

Log24 post of February 3, 2010

Suggested by a passage at dazeddigital.com

"Visser remembers the night everything changed
as if it was yesterday. It was February 3, 2010,
and the band had been booked to play a show
in Johannesburg."

Sunday, October 21, 2012

Logos

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:01 PM

In memory of Leonard Shlain, author
of The Alphabet Versus the Goddess

Alphabet logo from the website
of a religious publishing company—

A logo for Charlize Theron, who played
a goddess figure in "Hancock"—

Click images for further details.

Friday, October 19, 2012

Torpedo… LOS!

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:00 PM

"Hitchcock made movies with many actresses
who had the aloof, Nordic beauty he admired."

— Alessandra Stanley in today's NY Times

Aloof, Nordic…

Freeze Frame

IMAGE- Charlize Theron as Ravenna with raven in poster for 'Snow White and the Huntsman'

Related material:

Fermata

Wednesday, February 3, 2010

Holly Day

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:00 AM

Today's word:

The musical notation 'fermata,' or 'birdseye'

fermata

"February made me shiver…."
American Pie

Thursday, July 2, 2009

Thursday July 2, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Hieron Grammaton, Part III*

The Old Man and the Light

In memory of
Ernest Hemingway,
who died on this date
in 1961, a story
in three parts:

 

I — Eye of Raven

The musical notation 'fermata,' or 'birdseye'

Fermata

 

II — Psyche and Symbol

Leonard Baskin, detail of cover of Jung's 'Psyche and Symbol'

Leonard Baskin, detail of
cover for Jung’s
Psyche and Symbol

 

III — Raven Steals the Light

The box of light from animated video of 'Raven Steals the Light'

Detail from the story
Raven Steals the Light

Midrash:

“To the earnestness of death belongs precisely that capacity for awakening, that resonance of a profound mockery which, detached from the thought of the eternal, is an empty and often brash jest, but together with the thought of the eternal is just what it should be….” —Kierkegaard

* For Hieron Grammaton, Parts I and II, see the five Log24 entries from 6:29 PM Tuesday, June 23, to 1:00 AM Sunday, June 28.

Wednesday, February 20, 2008

Wednesday February 20, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:48 AM
 About Five Years Ago:

M. V. Ramana on a famous quotation–
 
"Oppenheimer had learned Sanskrit at Berkeley so as to read the Gita in the original; he always kept a worn pink copy on the bookshelf closest to his desk. It is therefore likely that he may have actually thought of the original, Sanskrit, verse rather than the English translation. The closest that fits this meaning is in the 32nd verse from the 11th chapter of the Gita.

 kalosmi lokaksaya krt pravrddho

This literally means: I am kAla, the great destroyer of Worlds. What is intriguing about this verse, then, is the interpretation of kAla by Jungk and others to mean death. While death is technically one of the meanings of kAla, a more common one is time."

"KAla" (in the Harvard-Kyoto transliteration scheme) is more familiar to the West in the related form of Kali, a goddess sometimes depicted as a dancing girl; Kali is related to kAla, time, according to one website, as "the force which governs and stops time."  See also the novel The Fermata, by Nicholson Baker.

The fact that Oppenheimer thought of Chapter 11, verse 32, of the Gita may, as a mnemonic device, be associated with the use of the number 1132 in Finnegans Wake.

 See 1132 A. D. & Saint Brighid, and my weblog entries of January 5 (Twelfth Night and the whirligig of time), January 31 (St. Bridget's Eve), and February 1 (St. Bridget's Day), 2003

The custom-made asterisk
above may be regarded
as a version of
the "Spider" symbol
of Fritz Leiber.

Todo lo sé por el lucero puro
que brilla en la diadema de la Muerte
.

Rubén Darío

Related material:

The previous five entries
and the entries of
this date three years ago.

Time of this entry:

11:48:17 AM.

Tuesday, January 4, 2005

Tuesday January 4, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:00 AM
The Romantic School

Today’s New York Times:

“Mr. Denker was of the romantic school
of chess – always looking to attack.”

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050104-Chess.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Related material:

From Endgame:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050104-Endgame.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Black the knight upon that ocean,
Bright the sun upon the king.
Dark the queen that stands beside him,
White his castle, threatening.

In the shadows’ see a bishop
Guards his queen of love and hate.
Another move, the game will be up;
Take the queen, her knight will mate.

The knight said “Move, be done.  It’s over.”
“Love and resign,” the bishop cried.
“When it’s done you’ll stand forever
By the darkest beauty’s side.”

From Log24.net, Feb. 18, 2003:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050104-Kali.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Kali, a goddess sometimes depicted
as a dancing girl; Kali is related to kAla,
time, according to one website,  as
“the force which governs and stops time.”
See also the novel The Fermata,
by Nicholson Baker.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050104-Ferm.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

From an entry of Sunday, Jan. 2,
the day Denker died:

“Time had been canceled.”    
— Stephen King, The Shining

From Truth and Style, a tribute
to the late Amy Spindler, style editor
of the New York Times Magazine:

“I don’t believe in truth. I believe in style.”
— Hugh Grant in Vogue magazine, July 1995

From a related page,
The Crimson Passion:

“He takes us to the central activity
of mathematics—which is imagining….”

Harvard Magazine on
Harvard mathematician
and author Barry Mazur.

For related material on Mazur, see

A Mathematical Lie.

“The teenagers aren’t all bad.
I love ’em if nobody else does.
There ain’t nothing wrong
with young people.
Jus’ quit lyin’ to ’em.”

Jackie “Moms” Mabley

Tuesday, February 18, 2003

Tuesday February 18, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Fat Man and Dancing Girl

 

Dance of
Shiva and Kali

Paul Newman as
General Groves

 

Physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer, portrayed in the film "Fat Man and Little Boy," died on this date in 1967.

He is sometimes called the "father of the A-bomb."  He said that at the time of the first nuclear test he thought of a line from the Sanskrit holy book, the Bhagavad Gita: "I am become death, the destroyer of worlds."  The following gives more details.

The Bomb of the Blue God

M. V. Ramana

Center for Energy and Environmental Studies, Princeton University

Published in SAMAR: South Asian Magazine for Action and Reflection, Issue 13

Oppenheimer had learned Sanskrit at Berkeley so as to read the Gita in the original; he always kept a worn pink copy on the bookshelf closest to his desk. It is therefore likely that he may have actually thought of the original, Sanskrit, verse rather than the English translation. The closest that fits this meaning is in the 32nd verse from the 11th chapter of the Gita.

 kalosmi lokaksaya krt pravrddho

This literally means: I am kAla, the great destroyer of Worlds. What is intriguing about this verse, then, is the interpretation of kAla by Jungk and others to mean death. While death is technically one of the meanings of kAla, a more common one is time.  Indeed, the translations of the Gita by S. Radhakrishnan, A. C. Bhaktivedanta, Nataraja Guru and Eliot Deutsch say precisely that. One exception to this, however, is the 1929 translation by Arthur Ryder. And, indeed, in a 1933 letter to his brother, Robert Oppenheimer does mention that he has "been reading the Bhagavad Gita with Ryder and two other Sanskritists." The misinterpretation, therefore, may not have been the fault of Oppenheimer or Jungk. Nevertheless, the verse does not have anything to do with an apocalyptic or catastrophic destruction, as most people have interpreted it in connection with nuclear weapons. When kAla is understood as time, the meaning is drastically changed to being a reminder of our mortality and finite lifetimes ­ as also the lifetimes of everything else in this world (including plutonium and uranium, despite their long, long, half-lives!). It then becomes more akin to western notions of the "slow march of time" and thus having little to do with the immense destruction caused by a nuclear explosion. While the very first images that arose in the father of the atomic bomb are a somewhat wrong application of Hindu mythology, his recollection of the Bhagavad Gita may have been quite pertinent. As is well known, the Bhagavad Gita was supposedly intended to persuade Arjuna to participate in the Kurukshetra battle that resulted in the killing of thousands. Thus, Oppenheimer may well have been trying to rationalize his involvement in the development of a terrible weapon.

Source: Google cache of
http://www.geocities.com/CollegePark/5409/samar_bluegod.pdf

See also
http://www.samarmagazine.org/archive/article.php?id=36.
 
"KAla" (in the Harvard-Kyoto transliteration scheme) is more familiar to the West in the related form of Kali, a goddess sometimes depicted as a dancing girl; Kali is related to kAla, time, according to one website, as "the force which governs and stops time."  See also the novel The Fermata, by Nicholson Baker.

The fact that Oppenheimer thought of Chapter 11, verse 32, of the Gita may, as a mnemonic device, be associated with the use of the number 1132 in Finnegans Wake.

 See 1132 A. D. & Saint Brighid, and my weblog entries of January 5 (Twelfth Night and the whirligig of time), January 31 (St. Bridget's Eve), and February 1 (St. Bridget's Day), 2003.
 

Monday, February 17, 2003

Monday February 17, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:23 AM

Center of Time

Am I….

your fantasy girl
of puzzling parts?

Machine ballerina?

Suzanne Vega

Fermata

From the
Saint Matthew Passion
 (1729), by
 Johann Sebastian Bach

“The old man of ‘Sailing to Byzantium’ imagined the city’s power as being able to ‘gather’ him into ‘the artifice of eternity’— presumably into ‘monuments of unageing intellect,’ immortal and changeless structures representative of or embodying all knowledge, linked like a perfect machine at the center of time.”

— Karl Parker, Yeats’ Two Byzantiums 

“I wrote Fermata listening to Suzanne Vega, particularly her album ‘99.9° F.’  It affected my mood in just the right way. I found a kind of maniacal intensity in her music that helped me as I typed. So if Fermata is attacked, maybe I can say i’m not responsible because I was under the spell of Suzanne Vega.”

— Nicholson Baker, interview

For some real monuments of unageing intellect, see “Geometrie” in the weblog of Andrea for February 10, 2003.

Saturday, February 15, 2003

Saturday February 15, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:48 PM

The Recruit

From an obituary of Walt W. Rostow, advisor to presidents and Vietnam hardliner:

“During World War II, he served in the Office of Strategic Services, the predecessor agency to the Central Intelligence Agency.”

Rostow died on Thursday, February 13, 2003, the anniversary of the 1945 firebombing of Dresden.

Like von Neumann, Rostow exemplified the use of intellectuals by the state.  From a memoir by Rostow:

“…in mid-1941…. American military intelligence… was grossly inadequate….

…military leaders… learned that they needed intellectuals….

Thus the link was forged that yielded the CIA, RAND, the AEC, and all the other institutionalized links between intellectual life and national security that persist down to the present.”

— Walt W. Rostow, “Recollections of the Bombing,”
    University of Texas web page

“Look at that caveman go!”

— Remark in my entry of February 13, 2003

“So it goes.”

— Remark of Kurt Vonnegut in Slaughterhouse-Five

See also

Tralfamadorian Structure
in Slaughterhouse-Five
,

which includes the following passage:

“…the nonlinear characterization of Billy Pilgrim emphasizes that he is not simply an established identity who undergoes a series of changes but all the different things he is at different times.”

For a more recent nonlinear characterization, see the poem “Fermata” by Andrew Zawacki in The New Yorker magazine, issue dated Feb. 17 and 24, 2003, pp. 160-161.  Zawacki is thirty years younger than I, but we share the same small home town.

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