Log24

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Gnostic Effects

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:41 AM

"OCT 14, 2019  •  8:00 PM"

"Culturally, code exists in a nether zone.
We can feel  its gnostic effects  [link added]
on our everyday reality, but we rarely see it,
and it’s quite inscrutable to non-initiates.
(The folks in Silicon Valley like it that way;
it helps them self-mythologize as wizards.)
We construct top-10 lists for movies, games, TV—
pieces of work that shape our souls.
But we don’t sit around compiling lists of the world’s
most consequential bits of code, even though they
arguably inform the zeitgeist just as much."

— https://slate.com/technology/2019/10/
consequential-computer-code-software-history.html

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Für Elise

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

Elise in "The Adjustment Bureau" (release date: March 4, 2011)—

IMAGE- The perception of doors in 'The Adjustment Bureau'

A quote for this unlikely pair:

"Harry decides his chief peacetime duty is to use his
gift for gab to further his 'overriding purpose,' namely:
'By recalling the past and freezing the present he could
open the gates of time and through them see all
allegedly sequential things as a single masterwork
with neither boundaries nor divisions.' Once he opens
these gates, Harry will flood his audience with his
redemptive epiphanic impression that 'the world was
saturated with love.' "

Liesl Schillinger, review of Mark Helprin's novel
In Sunlight and in Shadow  in The New York Times ,
Oct. 5, 2012

A more realistic pair: Chuck Schumer and Iris Weinshall.

See also Adjustment Team (Wikipedia) and Gnostic Dick (Log24).

For some more-serious material, see another review by Schillnger
in a Log24 post of August 17, 2006— Special Topics

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Omens

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:49 AM

Not your average Bartleby and Loki.

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

The Cartoonist’s Wife

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:37 PM

On an author mentioned in the previous post's obituary:

The author's book —

Inside the Fire Temple

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:00 PM

(The title refers to Log24 posts now tagged Fire Temple.)

In memory of a  New Yorker  cartoonist who
reportedly died at 97 on October 3, 2019  …

"Read something that means something." 
New Yorker  advertising slogan

From posts tagged Tetrahedron vs. Square

This  journal on October 3

"There is  such a thing as a 4-set."
— Saying adapted from a 1962 young-adult novel.

Illustration (central detail   from the above tetrahedral figure) —

A White Stone for Bloom

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

Excerpt from a long poem by Eliza Griswold 
in a recent New Yorker —

Monday, October 14, 2019

Harold Bloom: July 11, 1930 — October 14, 2019

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:42 PM

Friday, April 26, 2013

High White

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

(Continued)

For Times Square Church
Click image for a video.

Review

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

The Oslo Version and The Lyche Omega

Those who prefer more traditional art 
may consult The Portal Project.

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Now What?

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:30 PM

(Rhetorical question on the NY Times  online front page, 
10:01 PM May 23, 2012, in teaser for "The Stone" column
about Philip K. Dick, "Sci-Fi Philosopher")

Where Entertainment Is God

Perhaps The Last Airbender ?

The NY Times  philosophy column "The Stone" is currently about gnosticism
and science fiction.

The Last Airbender  is about an avatar who is master of the four elements
air, water, earth, and fire. For a more sophisticated approach to gnosticism
and the four elements, see Irenaeus: Against Heresies.

See, too, Elements Diamond in this journal.

Tuesday, June 17, 2003

Tuesday June 17, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:20 PM

Claves Regni Caelorum

On actor Gregory Peck, who died Thursday, June 12, 2003:

"He had early success in 'The Keys of the Kingdom,' in which he played a priest."

As Peck noted in a videotape played at his memorial service June 16,

"As a professional," he added, "I think I'd like to be thought of as a good storyteller; that's what's always interested me."

June 16, besides being the day of Peck's memorial, was also Bloomsday.  My entry for 1 PM on Bloomsday, a day celebrating the Ulysses of James Joyce, consists of the three words "Hickory, Dickory, Dock."  A comment on that entry:

"I prefer the Wake."

The following, from the Discordian Scriptures, provides a connection between the Bloomsday mouse and the Wake of patriarch Gregory Peck.

Hickory Dickory Dock

Hickory, dickory, dock!

Here we are on higher ground at once. The clock symbolizes the spinal column, or if you prefer it, Time, chosen as one of the conditions of normal consciousness. The mouse is the Ego; "Mus", a mouse, being only "Sum", "I am", spelt Qabalistically backwards.  This Ego or Prana or Kundalini force being driven up the spine, the clock strikes one, that is, the duality of consciousness is abolished. And the force again subsides to its original level. "Hickory, dickory, dock!" is perhaps the mantra which was used by the adept who constructed this rime, thereby hoping to fix it in the minds of men; so that they might attain to Samadhi by the same method. Others attribute to it a more profound significance — which is impossible to go into at this moment, for we must turn to:
 
Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall….

The Bloom of Ulysses has a certain philosophical kinship with Yale literary critic Harold Bloom.  For material related to the latter Bloom's study of Gnosticism, see Chaos Matrix.  For the conflict between Gnostic and Petrine approaches to religion, see Poul Anderson's Operation Chaos.

From an account of Peck's memorial service:

"Mourners included… Piper Laurie…."

OK, he's in.

 

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