Log24

Wednesday, June 3, 2020

Label

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 5:35 PM

And the sailor said Brandy, you’re a fine girl . . . .

Theology for Jews

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 2:42 PM

See also Aloha.

But see as well . . .

Click to enlarge the above story by Paul Meyer, Dayton sports writer.

Saturday, May 23, 2020

Structure for Linguists

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:34 AM

“MIT professor of linguistics Wayne O’Neil died on March 22
at his home in Somerville, Massachusetts.”

MIT Linguistics, May 1, 2020

The “deep  structure” above is the plane cutting the cube in a hexagon
(as in my note Diamonds and Whirls of September 1984).

See also . . .

IMAGE- Redefining the cube's symmetry planes: 13 planes, not 9.

Thursday, May 21, 2020

Figuration

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:24 PM

See also Trojan Pony.

Monday, February 17, 2020

RIP Charles Portis

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:04 PM

     See also "True Grid " in this  journal.

Rosalind Krauss
in "Grids," 1979:

"If we open any tract– Plastic Art and Pure Plastic Art  or The Non-Objective World , for instance– we will find that Mondrian and Malevich are not discussing canvas or pigment or graphite or any other form of matter.  They are talking about Being or Mind or Spirit.  From their point of view, the grid is a staircase to the Universal, and they are not interested in what happens below in the Concrete.

Or, to take a more up-to-date example…."

"He was looking at the nine engravings and at the circle,
checking strange correspondences between them."
– The Club Dumas , 1993

"And it's whispered that soon if we all call the tune
Then the piper will lead us to reason."
– Robert Plant, 1971

The nine engravings of The Club Dumas
(filmed as "The Ninth Gate") are perhaps more
an example of the concrete than of the universal.

An example of the universal— or, according to Krauss,
a "staircase" to the universal— is the ninefold square:

The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/grid3x3.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

"This is the garden of Apollo, the field of Reason…."
– John Outram, architect    

See as well . . .

Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Very Stable Kool-Aid

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:16 PM

Two of the thumbnail previews
from yesterday's 1 AM  post

"Hum a few bars"

"For 6 Prescott Street"

Further down in the "6 Prescott St." post, the link 5 Divinity Avenue
leads to

A Letter from Timothy Leary, Ph.D., July 17, 1961

Harvard University
Department of Social Relations
Center for Research in Personality
Morton Prince House
5 Divinity Avenue
Cambridge 38, Massachusetts

July 17, 1961

Dr. Thomas S. Szasz
c/o Upstate Medical School
Irving Avenue
Syracuse 10, New York

Dear Dr. Szasz:

Your book arrived several days ago. I've spent eight hours on it and realize the task (and joy) of reading it has just begun.

The Myth of Mental Illness is the most important book in the history of psychiatry.

I know it is rash and premature to make this earlier judgment. I reserve the right later to revise and perhaps suggest it is the most important book published in the twentieth century.

It is great in so many ways–scholarship, clinical insight, political savvy, common sense, historical sweep, human concern– and most of all for its compassionate, shattering honesty.

. . . .

The small Morton Prince House in the above letter might, according to
the above-quoted remarks by Corinna S. Rohse, be called a "jewel box."
Harvard moved it in 1978 from Divinity Avenue to its current location at
6 Prescott Street.

Related "jewel box" material for those who
prefer narrative to mathematics —

"In The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test , Tom Wolfe writes about encountering 
'a young psychologist,' 'Clifton Fadiman’s nephew, it turned out,' in the
waiting room of the San Mateo County jail. Fadiman and his wife were
'happily stuffing three I-Ching coins into some interminable dense volume*
of Oriental mysticism' that they planned to give Ken Kesey, the Prankster-
in-Chief whom the FBI had just nabbed after eight months on the lam.
Wolfe had been granted an interview with Kesey, and they wanted him to
tell their friend about the hidden coins. During this difficult time, they
explained, Kesey needed oracular advice."

— Tim Doody in The Morning News  web 'zine on July 26, 2012**

Oracular advice related to yesterday evening's
"jewel box" post …

A 4-dimensional hypercube H (a tesseract ) has 24 square
2-dimensional faces
.  In its incarnation as a Galois  tesseract
(a 4×4 square array of points for which the appropriate transformations
are those of the affine 4-space over the finite (i.e., Galois) two-element
field GF(2)), the 24 faces transform into 140 4-point "facets." The Galois 
version of H has a group of 322,560 automorphisms. Therefore, by the
orbit-stabilizer theorem, each of the 140 facets of the Galois version has
a stabilizer group of  2,304 affine transformations.

Similar remarks apply to the I Ching  In its incarnation as  
a Galois hexaract , for which the symmetry group — the group of
affine transformations of the 6-dimensional affine space over GF(2) —
has not 322,560 elements, but rather 1,290,157,424,640.

* The volume Wolfe mentions was, according to Fadiman, the I Ching.

** See also this  journal on that date — July 26, 2012.

Monday, December 2, 2019

Aesthetics at Harvard

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 4:05 PM

"What the piece of art is about is the gray space in the middle."

— David Bowie, as quoted in the above Crimson  piece.

Bowie's "gray space" is the space between the art and the beholder.

I prefer the gray space in the following figure —

Some small Galois spaces (the Cullinane models)

Context:  The Trinity Stone  (Log24, June 4, 2018).

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Winners for Losers

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:42 PM

After Rothko

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:52 PM

RED
_____________________________________________________________________________


 

GRAY
______________________


Arya on Rothko

Monday, August 26, 2019

Firsts:  Farmer’s Daughter

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:45 AM

See as well the firsts of Sophia Lillis (Saturday, August 24).

Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Spring-Loaded

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:00 AM

Continued  (from previous post) . . .

British cover (2011) for 'From Eternity to Here,' by Sean Carroll

Saturday, August 17, 2019

Crystalline Complexity

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:08 PM

Burroway on Hustvedt in The New York Times ,
Sunday, March 9, 2003 —

See as well "Putting the Structure  in Structuralism."

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

Gate of Heavenly Peace

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:29 AM

Wikipedia — 

"The Tian'anmen (also Tiananmen or Tienanmen)
([tʰjɛ́n.án.mə̌n]), or the Gate of Heavenly Peace, is
a monumental gate in the centre of Beijing, widely
used as a national symbol of China. First built during
the Ming dynasty in 1420, Tiananmen was the entrance
to the Imperial City . . . ."

A related article on Chinese history, The Critical Moment,
suggests an associated (if only by title) webpage —

See as well The Painted Word .

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

A Wrinkle in Time and Space

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:32 AM

Or:  Tom Wolfe in the Quantum Realm

Related posts: Search Log24 for Bubble.

Saturday, May 4, 2019

The Long Strange Trip of Abstract Art

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:23 PM

In memory of an art collector's April 24 death —

See also Log24 on April 24

Friday, March 22, 2019

Charles Jencks’s Grand Unified Theory

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 2:00 PM

"The stars and galaxies seem static, eternal, or moving slowly
in deterministic patterns, becoming the background stage
on which we move. But if we could speed up the sequence,
we would see how dramatic and unpredictable this background
really is — an actor, director, script and stage all at once.
Moreover, it is a unified universe, a single unfolding event
of which we are an embedded part, a narrative of highly
dangerous and fine-tuned events, something more like
a detective thriller with many crimes and last-minute escapes
than the impersonal account of astronomy textbooks.
We are only just beginning to decipher the plot and figure out
the Cosmic Code, as Heinz Pagels puts it."

— Charles Jencks, The Architecture of the Jumping Universe :
A Polemic
  (How Complexity Science is Changing Architecture
and Culture), Academy Editions, 1995, rev. ed. 1997

"A Grand Unified Theory (GUT) is a model in particle physics…."
Wikipedia

"Under the GUT symmetry operation these field components
transform into one another. The reason quantum particles 
appear to have different properties in nature is that the unifying
symmetry is broken. The various gluons, quarks and leptons
are analogous to the facets of a cut diamond, which appear
differently according to the way the diamond is held but in
fact are all manifestations of the same underlying object."

— Heinz Pagels, Perfect Symmetry , Bantam paperback, 1986, p. 284

See also the recent post Multifaceted Narrative.

Thursday, October 25, 2018

Clerisy

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:18 PM

Two images from a post of April 11, 2014

Tom Cruise at the Vatican in MI3

_____________________________________________________________________

Michelle Monaghan, star of "The Path," in MI3 —

Hickory Dickory.

Saturday, September 22, 2018

The Venturi Manifesto

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:00 PM

Venturi reportedly died on Tuesday, September 18.*

See also this journal on that date.

* Fact check:

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Art-Historical Narrative

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:40 PM

Art history from Galerie St. Etienne

Summer Solstice Notes

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Midnight Art

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:03 AM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180905-Art-overarching_narrative-Tablet.gif

See also 12 AM Sept. 4 in this  journal, "Identity Crisis."

Related material — "Overarching" in this journal.

Update of 4:12 AM ET —

The name of the New Yorker  artist in the Identity Crisis post,
Tamara Shopsin, has now been added to the illustrated excerpt.

See as well . . .

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/04/obituaries/
kenny-shopsin-dead.html
.

itemprop="datePublished" 
content="2018-09-04T22:17:59.000Z"

Friday, August 24, 2018

The Wandelweiser Manifesto

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:35 PM

Or:  Signpost of Change

From a cartoon graveyard

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180824-Outre_Tinkering-NYer-Aug-27-2018-issue-p84.jpg

Backstory

Alex Ross on Wandelweiser, September 2016

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Deep Learning for Jews

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:23 PM

From The New York Times  on June 20, 2018 —

" In a widely read article published early this year on arXiv.org,
a site for scientific papers, Gary Marcus, a professor at
New York University, posed the question:

'Is deep learning approaching a wall?'

He wrote, 'As is so often the case, the patterns extracted
by deep learning are more superficial than they initially appear.' "

See as well an image from posts tagged Quantum Suffering  . . .

The time above, 10:06:48 PM July 16, is when  I saw

"What you mean 'we,' Milbank?"

Sunday, July 15, 2018

Fashion Statements

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 AM

See Glad Rags in this journal.

Bill Haley, not Michael J. Fox, was my  experience of 1955.

Thursday, July 12, 2018

The Bell

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 6:11 PM

Three hidden keys open three secret gates
Wherein the errant will be tested for worthy traits
And those with the skill to survive these straits
Will reach The End where the prize awaits

— Ready Player One , by Ernest Cline

"Look, my favorite expression is,
'When you go up to the bell, ring it,
or don’t go up to the bell.'
We’ve gone too far. We have to ring the bell."

Mel Brooks on "The Producers"
     in The New York Times  today.

A 2016 Scribner edition of Stephen King's IT —

Related material —

Mystery box  merchandise from the 2011  J. J. Abrams film  Super 8 

Saturday, July 7, 2018

Easter Eggs for Rosalind

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:19 PM

Three hidden keys open three secret gates
Wherein the errant will be tested for worthy traits
And those with the skill to survive these straits
Will reach The End where the prize awaits

Ready Player One , by Ernest Cline

Related text —

Tu es Petrus et super hanc petram
aedificabo ecclesiam meam et tibi
dabo claves regni caelorum
 

Mt. 16:18

Related imagery —

From Steven Spielberg's film "Ready Player One" (2018) —

From this journal on June 17, 2003

From The New York Times  on Easter night, 2007 —

Death of Sol LeWitt

See as well Rosalind Krauss on LeWitt:

Tuesday, July 3, 2018

The Ant and the WASP

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:56 PM

See also posts tagged "Lost" and a search for "Excellent Adventure."

Monday, May 28, 2018

Epstein on Art

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:16 PM

Joseph Epstein in the online Weekly Standard
on May 24, 2018, at 3:03 PM —

Hilton Kramer, in a powerful essay called “Revenge of the Philistines,” praised Wolfe’s account of the sociology of the visual art of the time. On the comedy inherent in the subject, he noted, Wolfe “is illuminating and often hilarious.” Yet, when it came to the analysis of ideas, Kramer felt, “when it comes down to actual works of art and the thinking they both embody and inspire, Wolfe is hopelessly out of his depth . . . and, no doubt, beyond his true interests.” He faulted Wolfe for his inability to understand the historical context of the contemporary situation in art or how we have come to where we are in a way that carries us well beyond “the drawing-room comedy of The Painted Word .” Kramer concluded: “It is this fundamental incomprehension of the role of criticism in the life of art—this enmity to the function of theory in the creation of culture—that identifies The Painted Word , despite its knowingness and its fun, as a philistine utterance, an act of revenge against a quality of mind it cannot begin to encompass and must therefore treat as a preposterous joke.”

For Kramer in greater depth, see an online biography.

Friday, May 18, 2018

Central Square

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:54 AM

This  journal 10 years ago today  had a link to a post on
Tom Wolfe's "Sorry, but Your Soul Just Died."

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Leap

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:45 PM

Quoted here on May 5, 2018

" Lying at the axis of everything, zero is both real and imaginary. Lovelace was fascinated by zero; as was Gottfried Leibniz, for whom, like mathematics itself, it had a spiritual dimension. It was this that let him to imagine the binary numbers that now lie at the heart of computers: 'the creation of all things out of nothing through God's omnipotence, it might be said that nothing is a better analogy to, or even demonstration of such creation than the origin of numbers as here represented, using only unity and zero or nothing.' He also wrote, 'The imaginary number is a fine and wonderful recourse of the divine spirit, almost an amphibian between being and nonbeing.' "

— A footnote from page 229 of Sydney Padua's
    April 21, 2015, book on Lovelace and Babbage

The page number  229 may also be interpreted, cabalistically,
as the date  2/29, Leap Day.

See Leap Day 2016 among the posts tagged Mind Spider.

Speak, Memory

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:29 PM

On the film "Anna" in the previous post

See also the above world premiere date in the posts of October 2013
esp. the post Conundrum.

Related material — An early scene in "Mindscape" . . .

. . . and "The Abacus Conundrum" in this journal.

DATA

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:17 PM

Quoted here on May 7, 2018

Novelist George Eliot and programming pioneer Ada Lovelace —

PBS last night —

Trailer for last night's PBS program on artificial intelligence —

Piano roll for "I am sixteen going on seventeen" (see previous post) —

From yesterday evening's "Strong Women" post

"It's been dirty for dirty
Down the line . . ."

— Joni Mitchell,
"For the Roses" album (1972)

"… for the roses
Had the look of flowers that are looked at.”

— T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets

May 17

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:45 PM

"Well, she was just 17 …" — Song lyric

See as well, from last Christmas Eve, Piano Roll.

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Strong Women

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:50 PM

Review

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 5:52 PM

The title of the previous post, "Church and Temple," together
with today's online New York Times  obituaries for singer 
Lara Saint Paul (d. May 8) and playwright Leah Rose Napolin
(d. May 13), suggests a review

See as well a Log24 search for Isaac Singer.

Church and Temple

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 10:48 AM

Same Old Story

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 9:00 AM

. . . as time goes by.

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Space Revisited

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:32 AM

"Well, let's see now "

— Tom Wolfe, July 18, 2009

Monday, May 14, 2018

Space

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:30 PM

"A generation lost in space" — Don McLean

See as well Varignon in the previous post.

Logos at Harvard

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:01 PM

In 2013, Harvard University Press changed its logo to an abstract "H."

Harvard University Press Logo, Before and After

Both logos now accompany a Harvard video first published in 2012,
"The World of Mathematical Reality." 

In the video, author Paul Lockhart discusses Varignon's theorem
without naming Varignon (1654-1722) . . .

Paul Lockhart on geometry

A related view of "mathematical reality" —

Note the resemblance to Plato's Diamond.

Saturday, May 12, 2018

The McLean Awakening

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:14 PM

"Oh, and there we were all in one place
A generation lost in space"

— "American Pie" by Don McLean

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Horn and Hard Art

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:17 PM

Or:   Bee Season  Continues

Click the automat image above to enlarge.
Click the Horn & Hardart image below for the source.

Andreas Feininger, LIFE magazine photos, 1946

See as well Catskills Heaven (Log24 on August 20, 2017) —

The Coen brothers, 2007 screenplay —

(From a novel by Cormac McCarthy)

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

The Lindbergh Manifesto

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:24 AM

"Creation is the birth of something, and
something cannot come from nothing."

— Photographer Peter Lindbergh at his website

From a biography of Lindbergh —

" it took Lindbergh awhile to find his true métier.
Born in Krefeld, Germany, in 1944….
Barely out of his teens, he became a painter who
embraced conceptual art and — for reasons he
has since forgotten — adopted the professional
name « Sultan. »   Lindbergh was a few years
short of his 30th birthday when he turned to
photography."

— "The Man Who Loves Women," by Pamela Young,
Toronto Globe & Mail , September 19, 1996

A Lindbergh work (at right below) from his conceptual-art days —

For a connection between the above work by Paul Talman and the
above "Mono Type 1" of Lindbergh, see…

Friday, February 21, 2014

Night’s Hymn of the Rock

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 3:33 AM

One way of interpreting the symbol  IMAGE- Modal Diamond in a square 
at the end of yesterday's post is via
the phrase "necessary possibility."

See that phrase in (for instance) a post
of July 24, 2013, The Broken Tablet .

The Tablet  post may be viewed in light
of a Tom Wolfe passage quoted here on
the preceding day, July 23, 2013—

IMAGE- Tom Wolfe in 'The Painted Word' on conceptual art

On that  day (July 23) another weblog had
a post titled

Wallace Stevens: Night's Hymn of the Rock.

Some related narrative —

IMAGE- The 2001 film 'The Discovery of Heaven'

I prefer the following narrative —

Part I:  Stevens's verse from "The Rock" (1954) —
"That in which space itself is contained"

Part II:  Mystery Box III: Inside, Outside (2014)

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

The Word

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:12 PM

Crucial

(In memory of art critic Hilton Kramer,
who died this morning)

See also “crucialin this journal.

Wednesday, December 6, 2006

Wednesday December 6, 2006

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 3:15 AM
Mathematical Imagery

From the current
American Mathematical Society
“Mathematical Imagery” page:

AMS Mathematical Imagery

From today’s New York Times:

Rosie Lee Tompkins obituary

“Rosie Lee Tompkins, a renowned African-American quiltmaker whose use of dazzling color and vivid geometric forms made her work internationally acclaimed despite her vehement efforts to remain completely unknown, was found dead on Friday at her home in Richmond, Calif. She was 70.” —Margalit Fox, NY Times 12/6/06
Tompkins was found dead
on December 1, 2006.
 From Log24 on that date:
The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06B/061201-DayWithout.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

That entry contained an excerpt from
Tom Wolfe’s The Painted Word

“What I saw before me was the critic-in-chief of The New York Times saying: In looking at a painting today, ‘to lack a persuasive theory is to lack something crucial.’ I read it again. It didn’t say ‘something helpful’ or ‘enriching’ or even ‘extremely valuable.’ No, the word was crucial….”

Related material:

Diamond Theory
 
and a politically correct
1995 feminist detective novel
about quilts,

A Piece of Justice.

From a summary of the novel:

The story deals with “one Gideon Summerfield, deceased.” Summerfield, a former tutor at (the fictional) St. Agatha’s College, Cambridge University, “is about to become the recipient of the Waymark prize. This prize is awarded in Mathematics and has the same prestige as the Nobel. Summerfield had a rather lackluster career at St. Agatha’s, with the exception of one remarkable result that he obtained. It is for this result that he is being awarded the prize, albeit posthumously.”  Someone is apparently trying to prevent a biography of Summerfield from being published.

The following page contains
a critical part of the solution
to the mystery:
The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06B/PieceOfJustice138.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Meanwhile, back in real life…

It is said that the late Ms. Tompkins
liked to work while listening to the
soundtrack of “Saturday Night Fever.”

“It’s just your jive talkin’
you’re telling me lies, yeah
Jive talkin’
you wear a disguise
Jive talkin’
so misunderstood, yeah
Jive talkin’
You really no good”

These lyrics may also serve
to summarize reviews
of Diamond Theory written
in the summer of 2005.

For further details, see
Mathematics and Narrative.

 

Friday, December 1, 2006

Friday December 1, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:07 AM

Day Without Art

From the Online Etymology Dictionary:

crucial – 1706, from Fr. crucial from L. crux (gen. crucis) “cross.” The meaning “decisive, critical” is extended from a logical term, Instantias Crucis, adopted by Francis Bacon (1620); the notion is of cross fingerboard signposts* at forking roads, thus a requirement to choose.

“… given the nature of our intellectual commerce with works of art, to lack a persuasive theory is to lack something crucial— the means by which our experience of individual works is joined to our understanding of the values they signify.”

Hilton Kramer in The New York Times, April 28, 1974

“I realized that without making the slightest effort I had come upon one of those utterances in search of which psychoanalysts and State Department monitors of the Moscow or Belgrade press are willing to endure a lifetime of tedium: namely, the seemingly innocuous obiter dicta, the words in passing, that give the game away.

What I saw before me was the critic-in-chief of The New York Times saying: In looking at a painting today, ‘to lack a persuasive theory is to lack something crucial.’ I read it again. It didn’t say ‘something helpful’ or ‘enriching’ or even ‘extremely valuable.’ No, the word was crucial….

The more industrious scholars will derive considerable pleasure from describing how the art-history professors and journalists of the period 1945-75, along with so many students, intellectuals, and art tourists of every sort, actually struggled to see the paintings directly, in the old pre-World War II way, like Plato’s cave dwellers watching the shadows, without knowing what had projected them, which was the Word.”

— Tom Wolfe, The Painted Word

For some related material from the next 30 years, 1976-2006, see Art Wars.

* “Note that in the original Latin, the term is not by any means ‘fingerpost’ but simply ‘cross’ (Latin Crux, crucis) – a root term giving deeper meaning to the ‘crucial’ decision as to which if any of the narratives are ‘true,’ and echoing the decisive ‘crucifixion’ revealed in the story.”

Wikipedia on An Instance of the Fingerpost.

Tuesday, February 21, 2006

Tuesday February 21, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:00 PM
Conceptual Lens

“Contemporary literary theory did not emerge in an intellectual and cultural vacuum. The subordination of art to argument and ideas has been a long time in the works. In The Painted Word, a rumination on the state of American painting in the 1970s, Tom Wolfe described an epiphany he had one Sunday morning while reading an article in the New York Times on an exhibit at Yale University. To appreciate contemporary art– the paintings of Jackson Pollock and still more so his followers– which to the naked eye appeared indistinguishable from kindergarten splatterings and which provided little immediate pleasure or illumination, it was ‘crucial,’ Wolfe realized, to have a ‘persuasive theory,’ a prefabricated conceptual lens to make sense of the work and bring into focus the artist’s point. From there it was just a short step to the belief that the critic who supplies the theories is the equal, if not the superior, of the artist who creates the painting.”

Peter Berkowitz, “Literature in Theory”


The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06/060221-Tilley.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Cover art by Rea Irvin

On this date in 1925,
The New Yorker
first appeared.

Related material:

Aldous Huxley on
The Perennial Philosophy
(ART WARS, March 13, 2003)
and William James on religion:

“James points out that… a mystical experience displays the world through a different lens than is present in ordinary experience. The experience, in his words, is ‘ineffable’….”


For an experience that is
perhaps more effable,
see the oeuvre of
 Jill St. John.

Related material:

A drama for Mardi Gras,
The Crimson Passion,
and (postscript of 2:56 PM)
today’s Harvard Crimson
(pdf, 843k)

Wednesday, February 8, 2006

Wednesday February 8, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM
Iconography
(continued)

“… iconography,
the concept and image
of the bride of Christ–
the sponsa Christi
assumed particular relevance in
the definition of women’s identity.”

Silvia Evangelisti in
Historiographical Reviews

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06/060208-Sponsa.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Related material:

 Arts & Letters Daily
(Feb. 8, 2006) annotated:

Dan Brown is not the first to have suggested that Jesus had a sex life– even Martin Luther said it. So what about the lady, Mary Magdalene?… more

“In ‘The Little Mermaid,’ Ariel’s true identity is the ‘Lost Bride,’ the Magdalene.”
Joan Acocella on pop religion in this week’s New Yorker

For literature profs of today, Theory is what the Dialectic was to Marxist intellectuals of the past: the key to almost everything… more

“Contemporary literary theory did not emerge in an intellectual and cultural vacuum. The subordination of art to argument and ideas has been a long time in the works. In The Painted Word, a rumination on the state of American painting in the 1970s, Tom Wolfe described an epiphany he had one Sunday morning while reading an article in the New York Times on an exhibit at Yale University. To appreciate contemporary art– the paintings of Jackson Pollack and still more so his followers– which to the naked eye appeared indistinguishable from kindergarten splatterings and which provided little immediate pleasure or illumination, it was ‘crucial,’ Wolfe realized, to have a ‘persuasive theory,’ a prefabricated conceptual lens to make sense of the work and bring into focus the artist’s point. From there it was just a short step to the belief that the critic who supplies the theories is the equal, if not the superior, of the artist who creates the painting.”
Peter Berkowitz, “Literature in Theory”

The idea that anyone, regardless of learning or class, could “come to Christ” went along with the idea of equal rights in America. William Jennings Bryan… more

“… evangelical Protestantism has always been an integral part of American political history.”
Michael Kazin, Dissent Magazine, Winter 2006

And from non-Protestantism, for the birthday of John “Star Wars” Williams, we have…

Sanctus from Missa “Veni Sponsa Christi” (pdf), by Manuel Cardoso (1566-1650).

Related material: Catholic Tastes and
                           A Mass for Lucero.

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