Log24

Thursday, September 18, 2003

Thursday September 18, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:45 AM

Happy Ending

From yesterday morning:

“At three o’clock in the morning
Eurydice is bound to come into it.”
Russell Hoban,
The Medusa Frequency

For June Carter Cash as Eurydice,
see The Circle is Unbroken.

Let us pray that Jesus College
will help this production,
with Johnny Cash as Orpheus,
to have a happy ending
.

From Jesus College, Oxford
Not the Jesus I had in mind, but it will do:

“… Filled with despair, Orpheus dragged himself back to earth with only his music left to him…. In death Orpheus once more entered the Underworld, still playing the lyre. He and Eurydice were permanently reunited. Many scholars see Orpheus as another pagan prototype of Christ.”

Amen.

Wednesday, September 17, 2003

Wednesday September 17, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:00 AM

Time’s Breakdown

“… even if we can break down time into component Walsh functions, what would it achieve?”

— The Professor, in “Passing in Silence,”
    by Oliver Humpage

“Being is not a steady state but an occulting one: we are all of us a succession of stillness blurring into motion on the wheel of action, and it is in those spaces of black between the pictures that we find the heart of mystery in which we are never allowed to rest. The flickering of a film interrupts the intolerable continuity of apparent world; subliminally it gives us those in-between spaces of black that we crave.”

Gösta Kraken, Perception Perceived: an Unfinished Memoir (p. 9 in Fremder, a novel by Russell Hoban)

“The Underground’s ‘flicker’ is a mechanical reconciliation of light and darkness, the two alternately exhibited very rapidly.”

Hugh Kenner on T. S. Eliot’s “Burnt Norton” in Four Quartets

From last year’s entries:

ART WARS September 12, 2002

Artist
Ben
Shahn
was
born
on
this
date
in
1898.

For some further reflections on flickering time,
see an essay by Nicholson Baker on

the Geneva mechanism
in movie projectors
.

“At three o’clock in the morning
Eurydice is bound to come into it.”
Russell Hoban,
The Medusa Frequency

For June Carter Cash as Eurydice,
see The Circle is Unbroken.

Let us pray that Jesus College
will help this production,
with Johnny Cash as Orpheus,
to have a happy ending.

Thursday, August 28, 2003

Thursday August 28, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:35 PM

Feast

of Saint Augustine

"Frère Jacques, Cuernavaca,
 ach du lieber August."

— John O'Hara, Hope of Heaven

 

"anticipate
 the
 happiness
 of heaven"
= "himmlisches
 Glück
 vorweg
 empfinden"

Englisch/Deutsch Wörterbuch

See also today's previous entries.

Thursday August 28, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:26 PM

Elegance

          Sigrid Estrada

Louise Glück, the
U.S. poet laureate.

Pulitzer winner Glück
named poet laureate

By CARL HARTMAN

The Associated Press
8/28/2003, 6:26 PM ET

WASHINGTON (AP) — Louise Glück, winner of a Pulitzer Prize and a dozen other poetry awards, will be the next U.S. poet laureate….

Asked for a sample of her work, she suggested five lines from “The Seven Ages,” published in 2001:

“Immunity to time, to change.  Sensation

Of perfect safety, the sense of being

Protected from what we loved

And our intense need was
                        absorbed by the night

And returned as sustenance.”

Thursday August 28, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 6:35 PM

Spirit

In memory of
 Walter J. Ong, S. J.,
professor emeritus
at St. Louis University,
St. Louis, Missouri

"The Garden of Eden is behind us
and there is no road back to innocence;
we can only go forward."

— Anne Morrow Lindbergh,
Earth Shine, p. xii

  Earth Shine, p. xiii: 

We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.

— T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets.

Eliot was a native of St. Louis.

"Every city has its gates, which need not be of stone. Nor need soldiers be upon them or watchers before them. At first, when cities were jewels in a dark and mysterious world, they tended to be round and they had protective walls. To enter, one had to pass through gates, the reward for which was shelter from the overwhelming forests and seas, the merciless and taxing expanse of greens, whites, and blues–wild and free–that stopped at the city walls.

In time the ramparts became higher and the gates more massive, until they simply disappeared and were replaced by barriers, subtler than stone, that girded every city like a crown and held in its spirit."

Mark Helprin, Winter's Tale

Book Cover,
1954:

"The pattern of the heavens
     and high, night air"
Wallace Stevens,
An Ordinary Evening in New Haven

See also my notes of
Monday, August 25, 2003
(the feast day of Saint Louis,
for whom the city is named).

For a more Eden-like city,
see my note of
October 23, 2002,
on Cuernavaca, Mexico,
where Charles Lindbergh
courted Anne Morrow.
 

Tuesday, June 17, 2003

Tuesday June 17, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:20 PM

Claves Regni Caelorum

On actor Gregory Peck, who died Thursday, June 12, 2003:

"He had early success in 'The Keys of the Kingdom,' in which he played a priest."

As Peck noted in a videotape played at his memorial service June 16,

"As a professional," he added, "I think I'd like to be thought of as a good storyteller; that's what's always interested me."

June 16, besides being the day of Peck's memorial, was also Bloomsday.  My entry for 1 PM on Bloomsday, a day celebrating the Ulysses of James Joyce, consists of the three words "Hickory, Dickory, Dock."  A comment on that entry:

"I prefer the Wake."

The following, from the Discordian Scriptures, provides a connection between the Bloomsday mouse and the Wake of patriarch Gregory Peck.

Hickory Dickory Dock

Hickory, dickory, dock!

Here we are on higher ground at once. The clock symbolizes the spinal column, or if you prefer it, Time, chosen as one of the conditions of normal consciousness. The mouse is the Ego; "Mus", a mouse, being only "Sum", "I am", spelt Qabalistically backwards.  This Ego or Prana or Kundalini force being driven up the spine, the clock strikes one, that is, the duality of consciousness is abolished. And the force again subsides to its original level. "Hickory, dickory, dock!" is perhaps the mantra which was used by the adept who constructed this rime, thereby hoping to fix it in the minds of men; so that they might attain to Samadhi by the same method. Others attribute to it a more profound significance — which is impossible to go into at this moment, for we must turn to:
 
Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall….

The Bloom of Ulysses has a certain philosophical kinship with Yale literary critic Harold Bloom.  For material related to the latter Bloom's study of Gnosticism, see Chaos Matrix.  For the conflict between Gnostic and Petrine approaches to religion, see Poul Anderson's Operation Chaos.

From an account of Peck's memorial service:

"Mourners included… Piper Laurie…."

OK, he's in.

 

Monday, June 16, 2003

Monday June 16, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM

Bloomsday, 1 PM

Hickory Dickory Dock.

Monday June 16, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Bloomsday.

See Bloom and Midsummer Eve's Dream.

Thursday, February 4, 2010

Phenomenology of 256

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:30 AM

From Peter J. Cameron's weblog today

According to the Buddha,

Scholars speak in sixteen ways of the state of the soul after death. They say that it has form or is formless; has and has not form, or neither has nor has not form; it is finite or infinite; or both or neither; it has one mode of consciousness or several; has limited consciousness or infinite; is happy or miserable; or both or neither.

He does go on to say that such speculation is unprofitable; but bear with me for a moment.

With logical constructs such as “has and has not form, or neither has nor has not form”, it is perhaps a little difficult to see what is going on. But, while I hesitate to disagree with the Compassionate One, I think there are more than sixteen possibilities described here: how many?

Cameron's own answer (from problem solutions for his book Combinatorics)–

One could argue here that the numbers of choices should be multiplied, not added; there are 4 choices for form, 4 for finiteness, 2 for modes of consciousness, 2 for finiteness of consciousness, and 4 for happiness, total 28 = 256. (You may wish to consider whether all 256 are really possible.)

Related material– "What is 256 about?"

Some partial answers–

April 2, 2003 — The Question (lottery number)

May 2, 2003 — Zen and Language Games (page number)

August 4, 2003 — Venn's Trinity (power of two)

September 28, 2005 — Mathematical Narrative (page number)

October 26, 2005 — Human Conflict Number Five (chronomancy)

June 23, 2006 — Binary Geometry (power of two)

July 23, 2006 — Partitions (power of two)

October 3, 2006 — Hard Lessons (number of pages,
                                 as counted in one review)

October 10, 2006 — Mate (lottery number)

October 8, 2008 — Serious Numbers (page number)

Quoted here Nov. 10, 2009

Epigraphs at
Peter Cameron’s home page:

Quotes from Brautigan's 'The Hawkline Monster' and Hoban's 'Riddley Walker'

Happy birthday, Russell Hoban.

Monday, February 1, 2010

Frame by Frame

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 7:26 PM

From "Time's Breakdown," September 17, 2003

“… even if we can break down time into component Walsh functions, what would it achieve?”

– The Professor, in “Passing in Silence,” by Oliver Humpage

“Being is not a steady state but an occulting one: we are all of us a succession of stillness blurring into motion on the wheel of action, and it is in those spaces of black between the pictures that we find the heart of mystery in which we are never allowed to rest. The flickering of a film interrupts the intolerable continuity of apparent world; subliminally it gives us those in-between spaces of black that we crave.”

Gösta Kraken, Perception Perceived: an Unfinished Memoir (p. 9 in Fremder, a novel by Russell Hoban)

This flashback was suggested by

  1. A review in next Sunday's New York Times Book Review of a new novel, Point Omega, by Don DeLillo. The review's title (for which the reviewer, Geoff Dyer, should not be blamed) is "A Wrinkle in Time." The review and the book are indeed concerned with time, but the only apparent connection to the 1962 novel of Madeleine L'Engle also titled A Wrinkle in Time is rather indirect– via the Walsh functions mentioned above.
  2. A phrase in the Times's review, "frame by frame," also appeared in this jounal on Saturday. It formed part of the title of a current exhibition at Harvard's Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts.
  3. The Carpenter Center exhibition will have an opening reception on February 4.
  4. February 4 is also the birthday of the above Russell Hoban, who will turn 85. See a British web page devoted to that event.

DeLillo is a major novelist, but the work of Hoban seems more relevant to the phrase "frame by frame."

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Out of Inland

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:02 AM

Epigraphs at
Peter Cameron’s home page:

Quotes from 'The Hawkline Monster' and 'Riddley Walker'

See also the epigraphs in Cameron’s
Parallelisms of Complete Designs,
entries on this date three years ago,
Russell Hoban in this journal,
and
The Hawkline Monster in this journal.

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