Log24

Friday, May 4, 2012

That Krell Lab (continued)

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

“… Which makes it a gilt-edged priority that one  of us
 gets into that Krell lab and takes that brain boost.”

— American adaptation of Shakespeare's Tempest , 1956

From "The Onto-theological Origin of Play:
Heraclitus and Plato," by Yücel Dursun, in
Lingua ac Communitas  Vol 17 (October 2007)—

"Heraclitus’s Aion and His Transformations

 The saying is as follows:

αἰὼν παῖς ἐστι παίζων, πεττεύων·
παιδὸς ἡ βασιληίη

(Aion is a child playing draughts;
the kingship is the child’s)

(Krell 1972: 64).*

 * KRELL, David Farrell.
   “Towards an Ontology of Play:
   Eugen Fink’s Notion of Spiel,”
   Research in Phenomemology ,
   2, 1972: 63-93.

This is the translation of the fragment in Greek by Krell.
There are many versions of the translation of the fragment….."

See also Child's Play and Froebel's Magic Box.

Update of May 5— For some background
from the date May 4 seven years ago, see
The Fano Plane Revisualized.

For some background on the word "aion,"
see that word in this journal.

Friday, December 11, 2015

Street View

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:00 PM

Continued from Once Upon a Matrix  (November 27, 2015).

Click image below to enlarge.

“… Which makes it a gilt-edged priority that one  of us 
 gets into that Krell lab and takes that brain boost.”

— American adaptation of Shakespeare's Tempest , 1956

Midrash —

"Remember me to Herald Square."

Friday, March 30, 2012

Meanwhile… (continued)

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:09 AM

In memory of actor Warren Stevens

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100711-LanguageLab.jpg

“… Which makes it a gilt-edged priority that one  of us
 gets into that Krell lab and takes that brain boost.”

— American adaptation of Shakespeare's Tempest , 1956

Some other dialogue—

"Where is the cat?" he asked at last.

"Where is the box?"

"Here."

"Where's here?"

"Here is now."

"We used to think so," I said,
"but really we should use larger boxes."

— "Schrödinger's Cat,"
by Ursula K. Le Guin (1974)

Wednesday, July 29, 2009

Wednesday July 29, 2009

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:21 PM
Kaleideion

Adam and God (Sistine Chapel), with Jungian Self-Symbol and Ojo de Dios (The Diamond Puzzle)

Related material:

“A great deal has been made of the fact that Forbidden Planet is essentially William Shakespeare’s The Tempest (1611) in an science-fiction setting. It is this that transforms Forbidden Planet into far more than a mere pulp science-fiction story” — Richard Scheib

Dialogue from Forbidden Planet


“… Which makes it a gilt-edged priority that one of us gets into that Krell lab and takes that brain boost.”

Dialogue from another story —

“They thought they were doing a linear magnification, sort of putting me through a  magnifying glass.”

“Sizewise?”

“Brainwise, but what they did was multiply me by myself into a quadratic.”

Psychoshop, by Bester and Zelazny, 1998 paperback, p. 7

“… which would produce a special being– by means of that ‘cloned quadratic crap.’ [P. 75] The proper term sounds something like ‘Kaleideion‘….”

“So Adam is a Kaleideion?”

She shook her head.

“Not a Kaleideion. The Kaleideion….”

Psychoshop, 1998 paperback, p. 85


See also

Changing Woman:

“Kaleidoscope turning…

Juliette Binoche in 'Blue'  The 24 2x2 Cullinane Kaleidoscope animated images

Shifting pattern within   
unalterable structure…”
— Roger Zelazny, Eye of Cat  

“When life itself seems lunatic,
who knows where madness lies?”

— For the source, see 
Joyce’s Nightmare Continues.

Sunday, April 12, 2009

Sunday April 12, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:09 AM
Where Entertainment
Is God
, continued

Dialogue from the classic film Forbidden Planet

“… Which makes it a gilt-edged priority that one of us gets into that Krell lab and takes that brain boost.”

— Taken from a video (5:18-5:24 of 6:09) at David Lavery’s weblog in the entry of Tuesday, April 7.

(Cf. this journal on that date.)

Thanks to Professor Lavery for his detailed notes on his viewing experiences.

My own viewing recently included, on the night of Good Friday, April 10, the spiritually significant film Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull.

The mystic circle of 13 aliens at the end of that film, together with Leslie Nielsen’s Forbidden Planet remark quoted above, suggests the following:

“The aim of Conway’s game M13 is to get the hole at the top point and all counters in order 1,2,…,12 when moving clockwise along the circle.” —Lieven Le Bruyn

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09/090411-M13.gif

The illustration is from the weblog entry by Lieven Le Bruyn quoted below. The colored circles represent 12 of the 13 projective points described below, the 13 radial strokes represent the 13 projective lines, and the straight lines in the picture, including those that form the circle, describe which projective points are incident with which projective lines. The dot at top represents the “hole.”

From “The Mathieu Group M12 and Conway’s M13-Game” (pdf), senior honors thesis in mathematics by Jeremy L. Martin under the supervision of Professor Noam D. Elkies, Harvard University, April 1, 1996–

“Let P3 denote the projective plane of order 3. The standard construction of P3 is to remove the zero point from a three-dimensional vector space over the field F3 and then identify each point x with -x, obtaining a space with (33 – 1)/2 = 13 points. However, we will be concerned only with the geometric properties of the projective plane. The 13 points of P3 are organized into 13 lines, each line containing four points. Every point lies on four lines, any two points lie together on a unique line, and any two lines intersect at a unique point….

Conway [3] proposed the following game…. Place twelve numbered counters on the points… of P3 and leave the thirteenth point… blank. (The empty point will be referred to throughout as the “hole.”) Let the location of the hole be p; then a primitive move of the game consists of selecting one of the lines containing the hole, say {p, q, r, s}. Move the counter on q to p (thus moving the hole to q), then interchange the counters on r and s….

There is an obvious characterization of a move as a permutation in S13, operating on the points of P3. By limiting our consideration to only those moves which return the hole to its starting point…. we obtain the Conway game group. This group, which we shall denote by GC, is a subgroup of the symmetric group S12 of permutations of the twelve points…, and the group operation of GC is concatenation of paths. Conway [3] stated, but did not prove explicitly, that GC is isomorphic to the Mathieu group M12. We shall subsequently verify this isomorphism.

The set of all moves (including those not fixing the hole) is given the name M13 by Conway. It is important that M13 is not a group….”

[3] John H. Conway, “Graphs and Groups and M13,” Notes from New York Graph Theory Day XIV (1987), pp. 18–29.


Another exposition (adapted to Martin’s notation) by Lieven le Bruyn (see illustration above):

“Conway’s puzzle M13 involves the 13 points and 13 lines of P3. On all but one point numbered counters are placed holding the numbers 1,…,12 and a move involves interchanging one counter and the ‘hole’ (the unique point having no counter) and interchanging the counters on the two other points of the line determined by the first two points. In the picture [above] the lines are represented by dashes around the circle in between two counters and the points lying on this line are those that connect to the dash either via a direct line or directly via the circle. In the first part we saw that the group of all reachable positions in Conway’s M13 puzzle having the hole at the top position contains the sporadic simple Mathieu group M12 as a subgroup.”

For the religious significance of the circle of 13 (and the “hole”), consider Arthur and the 12 knights of the round table, et cetera.

But seriously…
 
Delmore Schwartz, 'Starlight Like Intuition Pierced the Twelve'

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