Log24

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

The Abacus Conundrum

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 1:44 AM

Continues.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101206-AbacusConundrum.jpg

Prequel from 1961 (click image for context):

Detail that may be interpreted as the Chinese
3×3 "Holy Field" and a Chinese temple bell—

"Ting-a-ling." — Kurt Vonnegut.

Monday, February 21, 2011

The Abacus Conundrum*

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:02 PM

From Das Glasperlenspiel  (Hermann Hesse, 1943) —

“Bastian Perrot… constructed a frame, modeled on a child’s abacus, a frame with several dozen wires on which could be strung glass beads of various sizes, shapes, and colors. The wires corresponded to the lines of the musical staff, the beads to the time values of the notes, and so on. In this way he could represent with beads musical quotations or invented themes, could alter, transpose, and develop them, change them and set them in counterpoint to one another. In technical terms this was a mere plaything, but the pupils liked it.… …what later evolved out of that students’ sport and Perrot’s bead-strung wires bears to this day the name by which it became popularly known, the Glass Bead Game.”

From "Mimsy Were the Borogoves" (Lewis Padgett, 1943)—

…"Paradine looked up. He frowned, staring. What in—
…"Is that an abacus?" he asked. "Let's see it, please."
…Somewhat unwillingly Scott brought the gadget across to his father's chair. Paradine blinked. The "abacus," unfolded, was more than a foot square, composed of thin,  rigid wires that interlocked here and there. On the wires the colored beads were strung. They could be slid back and forth, and from one support to another, even at the points of jointure. But— a pierced bead couldn't cross interlocking  wires—
…So, apparently, they weren't pierced. Paradine looked closer. Each small sphere had a deep groove running around it, so that it could be revolved and slid along the wire at the same time. Paradine tried to pull one free. It clung as though magnetically. Iron? It looked more like plastic.
…The framework itself— Paradine wasn't a mathematician. But the angles formed by the wires were vaguely shocking, in their ridiculous lack of Euclidean logic. They were a maze. Perhaps that's what the gadget was— a puzzle.
…"Where'd you get this?"
…"Uncle Harry gave it to me," Scott said on the spur of the moment. "Last Sunday, when he came over." Uncle Harry was out of town, a circumstance Scott well knew. At the age of seven, a boy soon learns that the vagaries of adults follow a certain definite pattern, and that they are fussy about the donors of gifts. Moreover, Uncle Harry would not return for several weeks; the expiration of that period was unimaginable to Scott, or, at least, the fact that his lie would ultimately be discovered meant less to him than the advantages of being allowed to keep the toy.
…Paradine found himself growing slightly confused as he attempted to manipulate the beads. The angles were vaguely illogical. It was like a puzzle. This red bead, if slid along this  wire to that  junction, should reach there— but it didn’t. A maze, odd, but no doubt instructive. Paradine had a well-founded feeling that he’d have no patience with the thing himself.
…Scott did, however, retiring to a corner and sliding beads around with much fumbling and grunting. The beads did  sting, when Scott chose the wrong ones or tried to slide them in the wrong direction. At last he crowed exultantly.
…”I did it, dad!”
…””Eh? What? Let’s see.” The device looked exactly the same to Paradine, but Scott pointed and beamed.
…”I made it disappear.”
…”It’s still there.”
…”That blue bead. It’s gone now.”
…Paradine didn’t believe that, so he merely snorted. Scott puzzled over the framework again. He experimented. This time there were no shocks, even slight. The abacus had showed him the correct method. Now it was up to him to do it on his own. The bizarre angles of the wires seemed a little less confusing now, somehow.
…It was a most instructive toy—
…It worked, Scott thought, rather like the crystal cube.

* Title thanks to Saturday Night Live  (Dec. 4-5, 2010).

Sunday, June 17, 2018

Bead Game Introduction

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:11 PM

From The Abacus Conundrum

Bastian Perrot… constructed a frame, modeled on a child’s abacus, a frame with several dozen wires on which could be strung glass beads of various sizes, shapes, and colors. The wires corresponded to the lines of the musical staff, the beads to the time values of the notes, and so on. In this way he could represent with beads musical quotations or invented themes, could alter, transpose, and develop them, change them and set them in counterpoint to one another. In technical terms this was a mere plaything, but the pupils liked it.… …what later evolved out of that students’ sport and Perrot’s bead-strung wires bears to this day the name by which it became popularly known, the Glass Bead Game.”

— Das Glasperlenspiel  (Hermann Hesse, 1943)

See also Web Audio Resources at GitHub.

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Speak, Memory

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 6:29 PM

On the film "Anna" in the previous post

See also the above world premiere date in the posts of October 2013
esp. the post Conundrum.

Related material — An early scene in "Mindscape" . . .

. . . and "The Abacus Conundrum" in this journal.

Friday, April 13, 2018

Mathmagic Land

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 5:45 PM

Continued from yesterday.

From Log24 on July 24, 2014

Later . . .

"Button, Button, Who's Got the Button?"

Manil Suri?

See also The Abacus Conundrum.

Friday, January 29, 2016

For Harlan Kane

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

(Author of The Abacus Conundrum )

The Galois Box

Monday, November 24, 2014

Homemade Aesthetics

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:48 PM

Continued from Tuesday, November 18, 2014

International poster for the 2010 film "Black Swan"—

"Death is a black swan." — Graciela Chichilnisky

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

For the Green Mountain Girls

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 9:13 AM

Tom Wolfe in The Painted Word  (1975):

"It is important to repeat that Greenberg and Rosenberg
did not create their theories in a vacuum or simply turn up
with them one day like tablets brought down from atop
Green Mountain or Red Mountain (as B. H. Friedman once
called the two men). As tout le monde  understood, they
were not only theories but … hot news,
straight from the studios, from the scene."

"Parable of American Painting," 1954 — From The Tradition of the New by Harold Rosenberg

"In this essay Rosenberg set out to explain what he believed to be definitively American about Abstract Expressionism. He did so by drawing on the American Revolutionary War for his metaphors, likening the new Americans to the coonskin trappers whose knowledge of their terrain enabled them to pick off the British soldiers (Redcoats), who followed the dictates of their military training. The professionally- trained soldiers were defeated because, as Rosenberg states, 'They were such extreme European professionals … they did not even see  the American trees.' 'Redcoatism' was, Rosenberg argued, a symptom of the old European world's stubborn rejection of the new. It did at one time also '[dominate] the history of American art,' he wrote, but with the advent of Abstract Expressionism, times had changed. And just as the Coonskins were victorious because they stood apart from the professional military, so the new American art was triumphant because, as Rosenberg saw it, it marked a profound break with the traditions of European art."

— TheArtStory.org

Lectures at Bennington, 1971

For example:

Art adapted today from the Google search screen. Discuss.

Our Most Important Product

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:45 AM

Hexagram 35:
Progress

"Then came a 'Robot Psychologist,' known as a Psychological Matrix Rotator,
developed for the Department of Defense. It is still used to literally 'see' that
the right man gets the right Army job."

Ronald Reagan, 1961 GE Sales Meeting

"Always with a little humor." — Yen Lo

In memory of Dr. Irving Peress,
who reportedly died on Thursday,
November 13, 2014.

Thursday, November 13, 2014

Progressive Matrix

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 6:00 AM

Yesterday's post and recent Hollywood news suggest
a meditation on a Progressive Matrix —

Oct. 12-14, 2005:

'A Poem for Pinter,' conclusion: 'Tick Tick Hash.'

'The Interpreter'-- Sean Penn to Nicole Kidman-- 'My Card.'

Click to enlarge.

"My card."

Structurally related images —

A sample Raven's Progressive Matrices  test item
(such items share the 3×3 structure of the hash symbol above):

IMAGE- Raven's Progressive Matrices item with symbols from Cullinane's box-style I Ching

Structural background —

Monday, April 25, 2011

The Kristen Effect

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:31 PM

From the author of The Abacus Conundrum

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101206-AbacusConundrum.jpg

Harlan Kane's sequel to The Apollo Meme

THE KRISTEN EFFECT

IMAGE- Kristen Wiig, 'Cock and Bull Story'

"Thus the universal mutual attraction between the sexes is represented."
Hexagram 31

Monday, March 7, 2011

Point Taken

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:00 PM

Recommended— An essay (part 1 of 5 parts) in today's New York TImes—

THE ULTIMATUM

I don’t want to die in
a language I can’t understand.
— Jorge Luis Borges

Comment 71

"I agree with one of the earlier commenters that this is a piece of fine literary work. And in response to some of those who have wondered 'WHAT IS THE POINT?!' of this essay, I would like to say: Must literature always answer that question for us (and as quickly and efficiently as possible)?"

For an excellent survey of the essay's historical context, see The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy article

"The Incommensurability of Scientific Theories,"
First published Wed., Feb. 25, 2009,
by Eric Oberheim and Paul Hoyningen-Huene.

Related material from this journal—

Paradigms, Paradigms Lost, and a search for "mere geometry." This last includes remarks contrasting Euclid's definition of a point ("that which has no parts") with a later notion useful in finite geometry.

See also (in the spirit of The Abacus Conundrum )…

The Monolith Epiphany

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110307-Monolith.jpg

(Note the Borges epigraph above.)

Monday, February 21, 2011

How Deep the Rabbit Hole Goes

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:17 PM

The sequel to Another Manic Monday and The Abacus Conundrum

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110221-BaublesBanglesBeads.jpg

You'll glitter and gleam so
Make somebody dream so that
Some day he may buy you a ring, ringa-linga
I've heard that's where it leads…

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110221-SinatraLeigh.jpg

Related material — Janet's Tea Party

Monday, December 6, 2010

In Hoc Signo

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 3:33 AM

Saturday Night Live  on December 4, 2010 —

'The Abacus Conundrum' from SNL

If you liked Harlan Kane's THE ABACUS CONUNDRUM, you'll love…

THE LOTTERY ENIGMA —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101205-NYlottery.jpg

                                 New York Lottery on Sunday, December 5, 2010

Related links— For 076, yesterday's entry on "Independence Day."
 For 915, see 9/15, "Holy Cross Day Revisited," and its prequel,
 linked to on 9/15 as "Ready When You Are, C.B."

See also "Citizen Harlan" and "The Beaver."

Powered by WordPress