Log24

Sunday, May 5, 2019

The Crimson Abyss

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:20 PM

Continues.

The following conference has just ended.

Yau's actual 70th birthday was April 4.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Partitioning the Crimson Abyss

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:00 PM

For the title, see Crimson + Abyss in this journal.

"Ready when you are, C. B."

Hexagram 63, "After Completion"

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

The Crimson Abyss

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:19 PM

"And as the characters in the meme twitch into the abyss
that is the sky, this meme will disappear into whatever
internet abyss swallowed MySpace."

—Staff writer Kamila Czachorowski, Harvard Crimson , March 29

1984

IMAGE- 'Affine Groups on Small Binary Spaces,' illustration

2010

Logo design for Stack Exchange Math by Jin Yang
 

Recent posts now tagged Crimson Abyss suggest
the above logo be viewed in light of a certain page 29

"… as if into a crimson abyss …." —

Update of 9 PM ET March 29, 2017:

Prospero's Children  was first published by HarperCollins,
London, in 1999. A statement by the publisher provides
an instance of the famous "much-needed gap." —

"This is English fantasy at its finest. Prospero’s Children 
steps into the gap that exists between The Lion, the Witch
and the Wardrobe
  and Clive Barker’s Weaveworld , and
is destined to become a modern classic."

Related imagery —

See also "Hexagram 64 in Context" (Log24, March 16, 2017).

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Easter Egg

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:00 AM

In memory of singer/songwriter
Jason Molina, who died March 16:

Hold on, Magnolia

Saturday, March 16, 2013

Puzzles

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 7:59 AM

For readers of The Daily Princetonian :

IMAGE- 4x4 array in 'Ancient Jewels' puzzle

(From a site advertised in the
Princetonian  on March 11, 2013)

For readers of The Harvard Crimson :

IMAGE- Harvard Crimson ad, Easter Sunday, 2008: 'Finite projective geometry as a graphic grammar of abstract design'

For some background, see Crimson Easter Egg and the Diamond 16 Puzzle.

For some (very loosely) related narrative, see Crosswicks in this journal
and the Crosswicks Curse  in a new novel by Joyce Carol Oates.

"There is  such a thing as a tesseract."
— Crosswicks author Madeleine L'Engle

Monday, September 17, 2012

Pattern Conception

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 10:00 AM

( Continued from yesterday's post FLT )

Context Part I —

"In 1957, George Miller initiated a research programme at Harvard University to investigate rule-learning, in situations where participants are exposed to stimuli generated by rules, but are not told about those rules. The research program was designed to understand how, given exposure to some finite subset of stimuli, a participant could 'induce' a set of rules that would allow them to recognize novel members of the broader set. The stimuli in question could be meaningless strings of letters, spoken syllables or other sounds, or structured images. Conceived broadly, the project was a seminal first attempt to understand how observers, exposed to a set of stimuli, could come up with a set of principles, patterns, rules or hypotheses that generalized over their observations. Such abstract principles, patterns, rules or hypotheses then allow the observer to recognize not just the previously seen stimuli, but a wide range of other stimuli consistent with them. Miller termed this approach 'pattern conception ' (as opposed to 'pattern perception'), because the abstract patterns in question were too abstract to be 'truly perceptual.'….

…. the 'grammatical rules' in such a system are drawn from the discipline of formal language theory  (FLT)…."

— W. Tecumseh Fitch, Angela D. Friederici, and Peter Hagoort, "Pattern Perception and Computational Complexity: Introduction to the Special Issue," Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B  (2012) 367, 1925-1932 

Context Part II —

IMAGE- Wikipedia article 'Formal language'

Context Part III —

A four-color theorem describes the mathematics of
general  structures, not just symbol-strings, formed from
four kinds of things— for instance, from the four elements
of the finite Galois field GF(4), or the four bases of DNA.

Context Part IV —

A quotation from William P. Thurston, a mathematician
who died on Aug. 21, 2012—

"It may sound almost circular to say that
what mathematicians are accomplishing
is to advance human understanding of mathematics.
I will not try to resolve this
by discussing what mathematics is,
because it would take us far afield.
Mathematicians generally feel that they know
what mathematics is, but find it difficult
to give a good direct definition.
It is interesting to try. For me,
'the theory of formal patterns'
has come the closest, but to discuss this
would be a whole essay in itself."

Related material from a literate source—

"So we moved, and they, in a formal pattern"

Formal Patterns—

Not formal language theory  but rather
finite projective geometry  provides a graphic grammar
of abstract design

IMAGE- Harvard Crimson ad, Easter Sunday, 2008: 'Finite projective geometry as a graphic grammar of abstract design'

See also, elsewhere in this journal,
Crimson Easter Egg and Formal Pattern.

Monday, May 6, 2019

Possibilities

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:25 PM

Related material — The last three posts —

The Crimson Abyss,
Transgressive Politics at Harvard, and
"Thousand" Rhetoric

— as well as Saturday's The Chinese Jars of Shing-Tung Yau.

Sunday, May 5, 2019

“Thousand” Rhetoric

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:28 PM

Compare and contrast —

"A Thousand Possibilities"
— Title of a Harvard Crimson  May 3 column

See also The Thousand  in this  journal.

Transgressive Politics at Harvard

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:02 PM

Related material —

See also the previous post.

Saturday, May 4, 2019

The Chinese Jars of Shing-Tung Yau

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

The title refers to Calabi-Yau spaces.

T. S. Eliot —

Four Quartets

. . . Only by the form, the pattern,
Can words or music reach
The stillness, as a Chinese jar still
Moves perpetually in its stillness.

A less "cosmic" but still noteworthy code — The Golay code.

This resides in a 12-dimensional space over GF(2).

Related material from Plato and R. T. Curtis

Counting symmetries with the orbit-stabilizer theorem

A related Calabi-Yau "Chinese jar" first described in detail in 1905

Illustration of K3 surface related to Mathieu moonshine

A figure that may or may not be related to the 4x4x4 cube that
holds the classical  Chinese "cosmic code" — the I Ching

ftp://ftp.cs.indiana.edu/pub/hanson/forSha/AK3/old/K3-pix.pdf

Friday, May 3, 2019

“As a Chinese jar” — T. S. Eliot

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 1:06 PM

 

Saturday, April 15, 2017

A Cinematographer Departs

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:04 AM

In memory of cinematographer Michael Ballhaus, who reportedly
died at 81 in Berlin on Tuesday evening, April 11, the first full day 
of Passover, 2017.

From a New York Times  description of his work —

"The sinuous shot, which shows people parting  
like the Red Sea. . . ." — Margalit Fox tonight

From Log24 on the reported date of Ballhaus's death:

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Design Abyss

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:00 PM


http://www.log24.com/images/IChing/hexagram29.gif  
Hexagram 29,
The Abyss (Water)

This post was suggested by an August 6, 2010, post by the designer
(in summer or fall, 2010) of the Stack Exchange math logo (see
the previous Log24 post, Art Space Illustrated) —

http://www.8164.org/☵☲/  .

In that post, the designer quotes the Wilhelm/Baynes I Ching  to explain
his choice of Hexagram 63, Water Over Fire, as a personal icon —

"When water in a kettle hangs over fire, the two elements
stand in relation and thus generate energy (cf. the
production of steam). But the resulting tension demands
caution. If the water boils over, the fire is extinguished
and its energy is lost. If the heat is too great, the water
evaporates into the air. These elements here brought in
to relation and thus generating energy are by nature
hostile to each other. Only the most extreme caution
can prevent damage."

See also this  journal on Walpurgisnacht (April 30), 2010 —

http://www.log24.com/images/IChing/hexagram29.gif

Hexagram 29:
Water

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100430-Commentary.jpg

http://www.log24.com/images/IChing/hexagram30.gif

Hexagram 30:
Fire

"Hates California,
it's cold and it's damp.
"

Image--'The Fire,' by Katherine Neville

A thought from another German-speaking philosopher

"Die Philosophie ist ein Kampf gegen die Verhexung
unsres Verstandes durch die Mittel unserer Sprache."

See also The Crimson 's abyss in today's 4:35 AM post Art Space, Continued.

Art Space Illustrated

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:45 AM

Another view of the previous post's art space  —

IMAGE by Cullinane- 'Solomon's Cube' with 64 identical, but variously oriented, subcubes, and six partitions of these 64 subcubes

More generally, see Solomon's Cube in Log24.

See also a remark from Stack Exchange in yesterday's post Backstory,
and the Stack Exchange math logo below, which recalls the above 
cube arrangement from "Affine groups on small binary spaces" (1984).

IMAGE- Current math.stackexchange.com logo and a 1984 figure from 'Notes on Groups and Geometry, 1978-1986'

Art Space, Continued

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:35 AM

"And as the characters in the meme twitch into the abyss
that is the sky, this meme will disappear into whatever
internet abyss swallowed MySpace."

—Staff writer Kamila Czachorowski, Harvard Crimson  today

From Log24 posts tagged Art Space

From a recent paper on Kummer varieties,
arXiv:1208.1229v3 [math.AG] 12 Jun 2013,
The Universal Kummer Threefold,” by
Qingchun Ren, Steven V Sam, Gus Schrader, and
Bernd Sturmfels —

IMAGE- 'Consider the 6-dimensional vector space over the 2-element field,' from 'The Universal Kummer Threefold'

Two such considerations —

IMAGE- 'American Hustle' and Art Cube

IMAGE- Cube for study of I Ching group actions, with Jackie Chan and Nicole Kidman 

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Staying Sanguine

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:26 PM

On The Passion of the Christ

" I went with a Jewish pal, who tried to stay sanguine.
‘The Jews may have killed Jesus,’ he said. 
‘But they also gave us "Easter Parade." ’ "

— The New York Times , Feb. 26, 2004,
     quoted here  on that same date

For the Children in the Apple Tree (continued)

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 6:00 AM

(See previous posts now tagged Apple Tree Children.)

See as well the comic book in "Midnight Special" —

(Image previously posted in "Common Core vs. Central Structure")

Monday, July 4, 2016

The Hebrew Connection

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 AM

For the Church of  Synchronology

From the literary journal ELH , Winter 1973

See as well

"The explosion panicked parkgoers and could be heard nearby
at the Orthodox Fifth Avenue Synagogue, where the funeral for
Nobel laureate and Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel was underway.
Police said they do not think the blast was targeting the funeral."

Justin Jouvenal in The Washington Post , 7:01 PM ET
     on July 3, 2016

Also, from Mark Helprin's In Sunlight and in Shadow ,
a passage linked to here on August 30, 2013

Friday, February 26, 2016

Literacy Test

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:13 PM
 
כֵּֽאלֹהִ֔ים

Being Interpreted:

9 + 4 = 13.

Midrash

Line at Infinity .

Sunday, April 12, 2015

Symbol of Heaven

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:00 PM

Today is Easter Sunday in the Orthodox Church.

Two readings:

"Ancient Symbol of Heaven"

From "Misunderstood Masterpiece," an essay
in the Jesuit weekly America  on Salvador Dali's
"The Sacrament of the Last Supper" —

"The setting is distinctive: a dodecahedron,
or 12-sided space, that we perceive in the
pentagon-shaped windowpanes behind the
table. The architecture is also transparent.
The dodecahedron is an ancient symbol of
heaven, where this event is taking place.
This is the realm of the Father…."

— Michael Anthony Novak, Nov. 5, 2012

Scholarship, Not Rhetoric

A PDF of the Kotrc paper is available online.

The Greek Fifth Element:

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

The Dodecahedron .

This Platonic solid appears, for instance, on the cover 
of a colorful text titled The Heart of Mathematics 
(Wiley, third edition, 2009) —

For serious  students, here is a better book, more in
keeping with the above authors' later interpretation  
of the fifth element as change :

Saturday, April 11, 2015

The Starbird Manifesto

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:00 PM

"But what was supposed to be the source of a compound's
authority? Why, the same as that of all new religious movements:
direct access to the godhead, which in this case was Creativity."

— Tom Wolfe, From Bauhaus to Our House

"Creativity is not a matter of magical inspiration."

— Burger and Starbird, The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking  (2012) 

Video published on Oct 19, 2012

"In this fifth of five videos, mathematics professor
Michael Starbird talks about the fifth element
in his new book, The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking ,
co-authored with Williams College professor
Edward B. Burger." 

For more on the Starbird manifesto, see Princeton University Press.

An excerpt —

See also a post for Abel's Birthday, 2011 —  
Midnight in Oslo — and a four-elements image from
the Jan. 26, 2010, post Symbology —

Logo for 'Elements of Finite Geometry'.

Yale Mot

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:01 PM

From a New York Post  review of "Clouds of Sils Maria,"
a film that opened yesterday —

"Assayas [the writer-director] evidently thinks he’s
being daring and original and avant-garde in leaving
so much open-ended. But you can tell what really
interests him isn’t doing the work of a serious artist
but the comfy trappings of one — the swank dining
rooms, the posh cars with drivers always at the ready.
What’s French for bourgeois? Never mind.
'Clouds' isn’t a film but an idea for a film —
unfinished, unsatisfying, undergraduate."

Kyle Smith, Yale '89

From this date last year:

"Here was finality indeed, and cleavage!"

Friday, April 10, 2015

Living Theater

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:55 PM

 "It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of …."

See also OCODE .

Immaculate Inception

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 3:00 PM

See also Midnight Purple
and today's previous post.

Monday, January 4, 2010

Google’s Apple Tree

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:30 AM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10/100104-Apple.jpg

Google has illuminated its search page today with a falling apple in honor of what it is pleased to call the birthday of Newton. (When Newton was born, the calendar showed it was Christmas Day, 1642; Google prefers to associate Sir Isaac with a later version of the calendar.)

Some related observations–

Adapted from a Log24 entry
of Monday, March 24, 2008–
 

 

"Hanging from the highest limb
of the apple tree are
     the three God's Eyes…"

    — Ken Kesey

"But what's beautiful can't be bad. You're not bad, North Wind?"

"No; I'm not bad. But sometimes beautiful things grow bad by doing bad, and it takes some time for their badness to spoil their beauty. So little boys may be mistaken if they go after things because they are beautiful."

"Well, I will go with you because you are beautiful and good, too."

"Ah, but there's another thing, Diamond:– What if I should look ugly without being bad– look ugly myself because I am making ugly things beautiful?– What then?"

"I don't quite understand you, North Wind. You tell me what then."

"Well, I will tell you. If you see me with my face all black, don't be frightened. If you see me flapping wings like a bat's, as big as the whole sky, don't be frightened. If you hear me raging ten times worse than Mrs. Bill, the blacksmith's wife– even if you see me looking in at people's windows like Mrs. Eve Dropper, the gardener's wife– you must believe that I am doing my work. Nay, Diamond, if I change into a serpent or a tiger, you must not let go your hold of me, for my hand will never change in yours if you keep a good hold. If you keep a hold, you will know who I am all the time, even when you look at me and can't see me the least like the North Wind. I may look something very awful. Do you understand?"

"Quite well," said little Diamond.

"Come along, then," said North Wind, and disappeared behind the mountain of hay.

Diamond crept out of bed and followed her.

    — George MacDonald,
      At the Back of the North Wind

   

From Log24 on Sunday, March 23, 2008–

 
A sequel to
The Crimson Passion

Easter Egg

Jill St. John with diamond

Click on image
 for further details.


Duality:


A pair of book covers in honor
  of the dies natalis of T. S. Eliot–

http://www.log24.com/log10/saved/100103-TheAristocrat_files/100104-Duality.jpg

From Virginia Woolf,  "Modern Fiction" (Ch. 13 in The Common Reader, First Series)

Woolf on what she calls "materialist" fiction–

Life escapes; and perhaps without life nothing else is worth while. It is a confession of vagueness to have to make use of such a figure as this, but we scarcely better the matter by speaking, as critics are prone to do, of reality. Admitting the vagueness which afflicts all criticism of novels, let us hazard the opinion that for us at this moment the form of fiction most in vogue more often misses than secures the thing we seek. Whether we call it life or spirit, truth or reality, this, the essential thing, has moved off, or on, and refuses to be contained any longer in such ill-fitting vestments as we provide. Nevertheless, we go on perseveringly, conscientiously, constructing our two and thirty chapters after a design which more and more ceases to resemble the vision in our minds. So much of the enormous labour of proving the solidity, the likeness to life, of the story is not merely labour thrown away but labour misplaced to the extent of obscuring and blotting out the light of the conception. The writer seems constrained, not by his own free will but by some powerful and unscrupulous tyrant who has him in thrall, to provide a plot, to provide comedy, tragedy, love interest, and an air of probability embalming the whole so impeccable that if all his figures were to come to life they would find themselves dressed down to the last button of their coats in the fashion of the hour. The tyrant is obeyed; the novel is done to a turn. But sometimes, more and more often as time goes by, we suspect a momentary doubt, a spasm of rebellion, as the pages fill themselves in the customary way. Is life like this? Must novels be like this?

Look within and life, it seems, is very far from being “like this”. Examine for a moment an ordinary mind on an ordinary day. The mind receives a myriad impressions—trivial, fantastic, evanescent, or engraved with the sharpness of steel. From all sides they come, an incessant shower of innumerable atoms; and as they fall, as they shape themselves into the life of Monday or Tuesday, the accent falls differently from of old; the moment of importance came not here but there; so that, if a writer were a free man and not a slave, if he could write what he chose, not what he must, if he could base his work upon his own feeling and not upon convention, there would be no plot, no comedy, no tragedy, no love interest or catastrophe in the accepted style, and perhaps not a single button sewn on as the Bond Street tailors would have it. Life is not a series of gig lamps symmetrically arranged; life is a luminous halo, a semi-transparent envelope surrounding us from the beginning of consciousness to the end. Is it not the task of the novelist to convey this varying, this unknown and uncircumscribed spirit, whatever aberration or complexity it may display, with as little mixture of the alien and external as possible? We are not pleading merely for courage and sincerity; we are suggesting that the proper stuff of fiction is a little other than custom would have us believe it.

It is, at any rate, in some such fashion as this that we seek to define the quality which distinguishes the work of several young writers, among whom Mr. James Joyce is the most notable….

Thursday, July 2, 2009

Thursday July 2, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:29 PM
Meditation

on a joke by George Carlin,
a passage by Kierkegaard,
and the death on this date
12 years ago
of actor James Stewart

The Catholic Carlin:

“Thank you, Mr. Twain. Have your people call my people.” –George Carlin on learning he had won the Mark Twain award. Twain’s people were Protestant, Carlin’s Catholic.

The Protestant Kierkegaard:

“… the moment is not properly an atom of time but an atom of eternity. It is the first reflection of eternity in time, its first attempt, as it were, at stopping time….

Once here in Copenhagen there were two actors who probably never thought that their performance could have a deeper significance. They stepped forth onto the stage, placed themselves opposite each other, and then began the mimical representation of one or another passionate conflict. When the mimical act was in full swing and the spectators’ eyes followed the story with expectation of what was to follow, they suddenly stopped and remained motionless as though petrified in the mimical expression of the moment. The effect of this can he exceedingly comical, for the moment in an accidental way becomes commensurable with the eternal.”

Catholic tableau
(with Vivien Leigh
   representing the Church)
    of Salvation by Works

The cast of  'Streetcar Named Desire' in the radio scene

Protestant tableau
(with James Stewart
 as Protestant Pilgrim)
    of Salvation by Grace

Grace Kelly and James Stewart in 'Rear Window'

Click on either tableau
for a (much) larger image.

* Thanks to University Diaries for an entry on Clancy Martin, a philosophy professor in the “show me” state, and his experiences with AA. For a sample of Martin’s style, see a piece he wrote on Fabergé Easter eggs. For other Easter egg material, see this journal and (via a link) The Harvard Crimson, Easter 2008.  A valuable philosophical remark by Martin in a recent interview:

“An unscrupulous jeweler will swap diamonds for cheaper ones when jewelry is dropped off to be sized or repaired, he said.

‘It happens all the time,’ Martin said. ‘Nobody’s watching.'”

Sunday, March 23, 2008

Sunday March 23, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:00 AM
A sequel to
The Crimson Passion

Easter Egg

Jill St. John with diamond

Click on image
for further details.

Sunday, April 8, 2007

Sunday April 8, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:09 PM
Easter Night's online
New York Times,
front page, top center:

Death of Sol LeWitt

Related material:

ART WARS

Sunday April 8, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Today's sermon

Samuel Beckett on Dante and Joyce:

"Another point of comparison is the preoccupation with the significance of numbers. The death of Beatrice inspired nothing less than a highly complicated poem dealing with the importance of the number 3 in her life. Dante never ceased to be obsessed by this number. Thus the poem is divided into three Cantiche, each composed of 33 Canti…. Why, Mr. Joyce seems to say, should…. the Armistice be celebrated at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month? He cannot tell you because he is not God Almighty, but in a thousand years he will tell you… He is conscious that things with a common numerical characteristic tend towards a very significant interrelationship. This preoccupation is freely translated in his present work…."

— "Dante… Bruno. Vico.. Joyce," in James Joyce/Finnegans Wake: A Symposium (1929), New Directions paperback, 1972

See also Plato, Pegasus, and the Evening Star.

Sunday April 8, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM
Midnight in the Garden
continued from Sept. 30, 2004

Tonight this journal had two Xanga footprints from Italy….

At 11:34 PM ET a visitor from Italy viewed a page containing an entry from Jan. 8, 2005, Splendor of the Light, which offers the following quotation–

From an essay on Guy Davenport
 

"A disciple of Ezra Pound, he adapts to the short story the ideogrammatic method of The Cantos, where a grammar of images, emblems, and symbols replaces that of logical sequence. This grammar allows for the grafting of particulars into a congeries of implied relation without subordination. In contrast to postmodernists, Davenport does not omit causal connection and linear narrative continuity for the sake of an aleatory play of signification but in order to intimate by combinational logic kinships and correspondences among eras, ideas and forces."

— "When Novelists Become Cubists: The Prose Ideograms of Guy Davenport," by Andre Furlani

The visitor from Italy may, of course, have instead intended to view one of the four earlier entries on the page.  In particular, the visitor may have seen

The Star
of Venus

"He looked at the fading light
in the western sky and saw Mercury,
or perhaps it was Venus,
gleaming at him as the evening star.
Darkness and light,
the old man thought.
It is what every hero legend is about.
The darkness which is more than death,
the light which is love, like our friend
Venus here, or perhaps this star is
Mercury, the messenger of Olympus,
the bringer of hope."

Roderick MacLeish, Prince Ombra.

At 11:38 PM ET, a visitor from Italy (very likely the 11:34 visitor returning) viewed the five Log24 entries ending at 12:06 AM ET on Sept. 30, 2004. 

These entries included Midnight in the Garden and…

A Tune for Michaelmas

Mozart, K 265, midi

The entries on this second visited page also included some remarks on Dante, on time, and on Malcolm Lowry's Under the Volcano that are relevant to Log24 entries earlier this week on Maundy Thursday and on Holy Saturday.

Here's wishing a happy Easter to Italy, to Francis Ford Coppola and Russell Crowe (see yesterday's entry), and to Steven Spielberg (see the Easter page of April 20, 2003).

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070408-Prayer.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Image courtesy of
Hollywood Jesus:

When you wish
upon a star…

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