Log24

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

The Crosswicks Curse Continues

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:29 AM

"There is  such a thing as 1906 "

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

The Crosswicks Curse

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:08 PM

Continues.

It was a dark and stormy night 

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110420-DarkAndStormy-Logicomix.jpg

— Page 180, Logicomix

Friday, November 7, 2014

The Crosswicks Curse…

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:00 AM

Continues.

There is  such a thing as an MBTI Tesseract.

See a thread at http://www.typologycentral.com/forums/
from August 17 and 18, 2010.

See also this journal on those dates: The Kermode Game.

Thursday, February 27, 2014

The Crosswicks Curse

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 7:00 PM

(Continued)

"There is  such a thing as a tesseract."

— Saying from Crosswicks

IMAGE- From Dmitri Tymoczko's 'Geometry of Music,' Chopin and a tesseract

See also March 5, 2011.

Adapted from the above passage —

"So did L'Engle understand four-dimensional geometry?"

No and Yes.

Thursday, August 15, 2013

The Crosswicks Curse

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:23 AM

(Continued from previous posts)

A check of today's date in this journal
ten years ago yields a reference to the
Brazilian artist Athos Bulcão.

It turns out he died on July 31, 2008.
See that date in this journal.

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

The Crosswicks Curse

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 PM

(Continued)

"There is  such a thing as a tesseract." —A novel from Crosswicks

Related material from a 1905 graduate of Princeton,
"The 3-Space PG(3,2) and Its Group," is now available
at Internet Archive (1 download thus far).

The 3-space paper is relevant because of the
connection of the group it describes to the
"super, overarching" group of the tesseract.

Saturday, March 16, 2013

The Crosswicks Curse

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 4:00 PM

Continues.

From the prologue to the new Joyce Carol Oates
novel Accursed

"This journey I undertake with such anticipation
is not one of geographical space but one of Time—
for it is the year 1905 that is my destination.

1905!—the very year of the Curse."

Today's previous post supplied a fanciful link
between the Crosswicks Curse of Oates and
the Crosswicks tesseract  of Madeleine L'Engle.

The Crosswicks Curse according to L'Engle
in her classic 1962 novel A Wrinkle in Time —

"There is  such a thing as a tesseract."

A tesseract is a 4-dimensional hypercube that
(as pointed out by Coxeter in 1950) may also 
be viewed as a 4×4 array (with opposite edges
identified).

Meanwhile, back in 1905

For more details, see how the Rosenhain and Göpel tetrads occur naturally
in the diamond theorem model of the 35 lines of the 15-point projective
Galois space PG(3,2).

See also Conwell in this journal and George Macfeely Conwell in the
honors list of the Princeton Class of 1905.

Tuesday, April 9, 2019

Zero Dark Nine:

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:09 AM

The Crosswicks Curse Continues . . .

"There is  such a thing as geometry."

— Saying adapted from a 1962 young-adult novel.

Sunday, November 4, 2018

“Look Up” — The Breakthrough Prize* Theme This Evening

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:45 PM

Looking up images for "The Space Theory of Truth" this evening —

Detail  (from the post "Logos" of Oct. 14)

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=53323

Sunday, October 14, 2018

Logos

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:00 AM

New and old AMS logos —

I prefer the old.  Related material —

For an old Crosswicks curse, see that phrase in this journal.

For a new curse, see . . .

    "Unsheathe your dagger definitions." — James Joyce.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Something to Behold

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:45 PM

From a review of a Joyce Carol Oates novel
at firstthings.com on August 23, 2013 —

"Though the Curse is eventually exorcised,
it is through an act of wit and guile,
not an act of repentance or reconciliation.
And so we may wonder if Oates has put this story
to rest, or if it simply lays dormant. A twenty-first
century eruption of the 'Crosswicks Curse
would be something to behold." [Link added.]

Related material —

A film version of A Wrinkle in Time

The Hamilton watch from "Interstellar" (2014) —

See also a post, Vacant Space, from 8/23/13 (the date
of the above review), and posts tagged Space Writer.

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Arachne

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:33 PM

For Andrew Cusack.

A flashback from this  journal on the above remaking-myths date

See too The Crosswicks Curse.

Friday, July 7, 2017

Psycho History

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:00 PM

The title was suggested by the term "psychohistory" in
the Foundation  novels of Isaac Asimov. See the previous post.

See also a 2010 New York Times  review of
DeLillo's novel Point Omega . The review is titled,
without any other reference to L'Engle's classic tale
of the same name, "A Wrinkle in Time."

IMAGE- NY Times headline 'A Wrinkle in Time' with 24 Hour Psycho and Point Omega scene

Related material: The Crosswicks Curse.

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Decoration

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

A search for "Crosswicks Curse" in this journal leads (indirectly) to

Friday, March 14, 2014

The Search for Charles Wallace

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:19 PM

The search in the previous post for the source of a quotation from Poincaré yielded, as a serendipitous benefit, information on an interesting psychoanalyst named Wilfred Bion (see the Poincaré  quotation at a webpage on Bion). This in turn suggested a search for the source of the name of author Madeleine L'Engle's son Bion, who may have partly inspired L'Engle's fictional character Charles Wallace.  Cynthia Zarin wrote about Bion in The New Yorker  of April 12, 2004 that

"According to the family, he is the person for whom L’Engle’s insistence on blurring fiction and reality had the most disastrous consequences."

Also from that article, material related to the name Bion and to what this journal has called "the Crosswicks Curse"*—

"Madeleine L’Engle Camp was born in 1918 in New York City, the only child of Madeleine Hall Barnett, of Jacksonville, Florida, and Charles Wadsworth Camp, a Princeton man and First World War veteran, whose family had a big country place in New Jersey, called Crosswicks. In Jacksonville society, the Barnett family was legendary: Madeleine’s grandfather, Bion Barnett, the chairman of the board of Jacksonville’s Barnett Bank, had run off with a woman to the South of France, leaving behind a note on the mantel. Her grandmother, Caroline Hallows L’Engle, never recovered from the blow. ….

… The summer after Hugh and Madeleine were married, they bought a dilapidated farmhouse in Goshen, in northwest Connecticut. Josephine, born in 1947, was three years old when they moved permanently to the house, which they called Crosswicks. Bion was born just over a year later."

* "There is  such a thing as a tesseract."

Saturday, January 4, 2014

For Phil Everly

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:00 AM

A Souther song at YouTube.

See also the lyrics and, in this journal,
synchronicity on the uploading date.

Related art —

End of the Line Blues

IMAGE- YouTube statistics: 384 views, 3 thumbs up, 0 down.

and The Crosswicks Curse

IMAGE- The full group of hypercube symmetries, including both rotations and reflections, is of order 384.

Friday, November 1, 2013

Orange and Black at the White House

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:28 AM

See Josh Lederman's AP story on this year's
colorful White House Halloween decorations.
Orange and black are also the Princeton colors.
See as well The Crosswicks Curse.

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Tag (Part II)

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:29 AM

(Continued from yesterday evening)

Madeleine L'Engle in The Irrational Season
(1977), Chapter 9:

"After A Wrinkle in Time  was finally published,
it was pointed out to me that the villain, a naked
disembodied brain, was called 'It' because It
stands for Intellectual truth as opposed to a truth
which involves the whole of us, heart as well as
mind.  That acronym had never occurred to me. 
I chose the name It intuitively, because an IT
does not have a heart or soul.  And I did not
understand consciously at the time of writing
that the intellect, when it is not informed by
the heart, is evil."

You're…  IT.

Related material: Mathematics as a Post-Communist Activity.

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

The Long March

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:01 PM

See Women's History Month, 2013.

See also The Crosswicks Curse  and

Benchmark:

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

Cover Acts

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:00 AM

The Daily Princetonian  today:

IMAGE- 'How Jay White, a Neil Diamond cover act, duped Princeton'

A different cover act, discussed here  Saturday:

IMAGE- The diamond theorem affine group of order 322,560, published without acknowledgment of its source by the Mathematical Association of America in 2011

See also, in this journal, the Galois tesseract and the Crosswicks Curse.

"There is  such a thing as a tesseract." — Crosswicks saying

Saturday, April 13, 2013

Occupy Space

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:28 PM

(Continued from Seize the Dia,  April 6)

Two chess games by Fischer, against two brothers—

1956: "In this game, Fischer (playing Black) demonstrates
noteworthy innovation and improvisation." — Wikipedia

1963: "Fischer [playing Black] had engineered a brilliantly
disguised trap for him and … he had fallen into it." — NY Times

See also this evening's Times  obituaries and The Unfolding.

Some context:  The Crosswicks Curse.

Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Kountry Korn Kandy

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 PM

For the first two words of the title, 
see the previous post.

For the third word, see a review of the recent film "Hitchcock"
about the director and Janet Leigh during the filming of "Psycho"—

Hopkins' Hitchcock more or less eats out of Janet's hand
when she feeds him candy corn during a drive together
(the reference is to the candy Norman Bates is devouring
when he's interviewed by Martin Balsam's detective).

A story that demands the blended talents of Hitchcock and of
Mel Brooks to do it justice:

See also a 2010 New York Times  review of
DeLillo's novel Point Omega . The review is titled,
without any other reference to L'Engle's classic tale
of the same name, "A Wrinkle in Time."

IMAGE- NY Times headline 'A Wrinkle in Time' with 24 Hour Psycho and Point Omega scene

Related material: The Crosswicks Curse.

Saturday, March 16, 2013

Puzzles

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 7:59 AM

For readers of The Daily Princetonian :

IMAGE- 4x4 array in 'Ancient Jewels' puzzle

(From a site advertised in the
Princetonian  on March 11, 2013)

For readers of The Harvard Crimson :

IMAGE- Harvard Crimson ad, Easter Sunday, 2008: 'Finite projective geometry as a graphic grammar of abstract design'

For some background, see Crimson Easter Egg and the Diamond 16 Puzzle.

For some (very loosely) related narrative, see Crosswicks in this journal
and the Crosswicks Curse  in a new novel by Joyce Carol Oates.

"There is  such a thing as a tesseract."
Crosswicks author Madeleine L'Engle

Thursday, November 22, 2012

Putting the “I” in “IT”

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Jennifer Scott at IT Pro , Feb. 16, 2012, on Autonomy

Mike Lynch, founder of Autonomy  and vice president
of information management at HP, took to the stage
at his new parent company’s global partner conference
to impart his philosophy to the 3,000 partners gathered.

'It is no longer about the data but about the meaning
of that data,' he said. 'There is a fundamental revolution
going on in information and the industry is now about
the "I" not the "T" in IT.'"

Click on the logo below for the source.

See also today's previous post and…

Madeleine L'Engle in
The Irrational Season
(1977), Chapter 9:

"After A Wrinkle in Time  was finally published,
it was pointed out to me that the villain,
a naked disembodied brain, was called 'It'
because It stands for Intellectual truth
as opposed to a truth which involves the whole of us,
heart as well as mind.  That acronym had never
occurred to me.  I chose the name It intuitively,
because an IT does not have a heart or soul. 
And I did not understand consciously
at the time of writing that the intellect,
when it is not informed by the heart, is evil."

Friday, September 5, 2008

Friday September 5, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:23 PM
Adult Books
 

On author Madeleine L’Engle:

“Madeleine’s adult books– including the autobiographical titles that eventually would be grouped together as the Crosswicks Journals– A Circle of Quiet (1971), The Summer of the Great-Grandmother (1974), The Irrational Season (1976), and Two-Part Invention (1988)– were edited by Robert Giroux. If Roger Straus was FSG’s [Farrar, Straus & Giroux’s] worldly sophisticate presiding over editorial meetings, Bob Giroux was the white-haired, rosy-cheeked favorite uncle (if you happened to have an erudite uncle who had edited T. S. Eliot, Robert Lowell, Isaac Bashevitz Singer, Elizabeth Bishop, Flannery O’Connor, and Walker Percy).”

Sandra Jordan, School Library Journal, November 1, 2007

On Robert Giroux, who died early this morning:

the gold standard of literary taste.”

For a less demanding standard, see today’s previous entry.

Sunday, March 2, 2008

Sunday March 2, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:31 PM
Practical Magic

Halloween 2005:

“They don’t understand
what it is to be awake,
To be living
on several planes at once
Though one cannot speak
with several voices at once.”

— T. S. Eliot,
The Family Reunion

Margaret Wertheim with fellow tesseract authors

Several voices:

Margaret Wertheim in today’s
Los Angeles Times and at
The Pearly Gates of Cyberspace
,

Linda Dalrymple Henderson, and

Madeleine L’Engle and husband.

From Wertheim’s Pearly Gates:

Wertheim's 'Pearly Gates of Cyberspace,' page 200
“There is such a thing
as a tesseract.”

Madeleine L’Engle   

Tuesday, April 3, 2007

Tuesday April 3, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:00 AM

Mathematics Awareness Month

 
Related material:

"But what is it?"
Calvin demanded.
"We know that it's evil,
but what is it?"

"Yyouu hhave ssaidd itt!"
Mrs. Which's voice rang out.
"Itt iss Eevill. Itt iss thee
Ppowers of Ddarrkknesss!"

A Wrinkle in Time

AMS Notices cover, April 2007

"After A Wrinkle in Time was finally published, it was pointed out to me that the villain, a naked disembodied brain, was called 'It' because It stands for Intellectual truth as opposed to a truth which involves the whole of us, heart as well as mind.  That acronym had never occurred to me.  I chose the name It intuitively, because an IT does not have a heart or soul.  And I did not understand consciously at the time of writing that the intellect, when it is not informed by the heart, is evil."

See also
"Darkness Visible"
in ART WARS.
 
"When all is said and done,
science is about things and
theology is about words."
— Freeman Dyson,
New York Review of Books,
issue dated May 28, 1998

"Does the word 'tesseract'
mean anything to you?"
 

Friday, March 16, 2007

Friday March 16, 2007

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 10:48 AM
"Geometry,
 Theology,
 and Politics:

 
Context and Consequences of 

the Hobbes-Wallis Dispute"
(pdf)

 

by Douglas M. Jesseph
Dept. of Philosophy and Religion
North Carolina State University

Excerpt:

"We are left to conclude that there was something significant in Hobbes's philosophy that motivated Wallis to engage in the lengthy and vitriolic denunciation of all things Hobbesian.

In point of fact, Wallis made no great secret of his motivations for attacking Hobbes's geometry, and the presence of theological and political motives is well attested in a 1659 letter to Huygens. He wrote:

But regarding the very harsh diatribe against Hobbes, the necessity of the case, and not my manners, led to it. For you see, as I believe, from other of my writings how peacefully I can differ with others and bear those with whom I differ. But this was provoked by our Leviathan (as can be easily gathered fro his other writings, principally those in English), when he attacks with all his might and destroys our universities (and not only ours, but all, both old and new), and especially the clergy and all institutions and all religion. As if the Christian world knew nothing sound or nothing that was not ridiculous in philosophy or religion; and as if it has not understood religion because it does not understand philosophy, nor philosophy because it does not understand mathematics. And so it seemed necessary that now some mathematician, proceeding in the opposite direction, should show how little he understand this mathematics (from which he takes his courage). Nor should we be deterred from this by his arrogance, which we know will vomit poison and filth against us. (Wallis to Huygens, 11 January, 1659; Huygens 1888-1950,* 2: 296-7)

The threats that Hobbes supposedly posed to the universities, the clergy, and all religion are a consequence of his political and theological doctrines. Hobbes's political theory requires that the power of the civil sovereign be absolute and undivided. As a consequence, such institutions as universities and the clergy must submit to the dictates of the sovereign in all matters. This extends, ironically enough, to geometry, since Hobbes notoriously claimed that the sovereign could ban the teaching of the subject and order 'the burning of all books of Geometry' if he should judge geometric principles 'a thing contrary to [his] right of dominion, or to the interest of men that have dominion' (Leviathan (1651) 1.11, 50; English Works** 3: 91). In the area of church government, Hobbes's doctrines are a decisive rejection of the claims of Presbyterianism, which holds that questions of theological doctrine is [sic] to be decided by the elders of the church– the presbytery– without reference to the claims of the sovereign. As a Presbyterian minister, a doctor of divinity, and professor of geometry at Oxford, Wallis found abundant reason to reject this political theory."

* Huygens, Christiaan. 1888-1950. Les oeuvres complètes de Chrisiaan Huygens. Ed. La Société Hollandaise des Sciences. 22 vols. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff.

** Hobbes, Thomas. [1839-45] 1966. The English Works of Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury, now First Collected and Edited by Sir William Molesworth. Edited by William Molesworth. 11 vols. Reprint. Aalen, Germany: Scientia Verlag.

 

Related material:

"But what is it?"
Calvin demanded.
"We know that it's evil,
but what is it?"

"Yyouu hhave ssaidd itt!"
Mrs. Which's voice rang out.
"Itt iss Eevill. Itt iss thee
Ppowers of Ddarrkknesss!"

A Wrinkle in Time

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070316-AMScover.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

"After A Wrinkle in Time was finally published, it was pointed out to me that the villain, a naked disembodied brain, was called 'It' because It stands for Intellectual truth as opposed to a truth which involves the whole of us, heart as well as mind.  That acronym had never occurred to me.  I chose the name It intuitively, because an IT does not have a heart or soul.  And I did not understand consciously at the time of writing that the intellect, when it is not informed by the heart, is evil."

 

See also
"Darkness Visible"
in ART WARS.
 

Saturday, January 27, 2007

Saturday January 27, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM
Art and the
Holy Spirit

Madeleine L'Engle in The Irrational Season (1977), beginning of Chapter 9 (on Pentecost):

"The Holy Spirit, the third person of the Trinity, is the easiest of this not-at-all-easy concept for me to understand.  Any artist, great or small, knows moments when something more than he takes over, and he moves into a kind of 'overdrive,' where he works as ordinarily he cannot work.  When he is through, there is a sense of exhilaration, exhaustion, and joy.  All our best work comes in this fashion, and it is humbling and exciting.

After A Wrinkle in Time was finally published, it was pointed out to me that the villain, a naked disembodied brain, was called 'It' because It stands for Intellectual truth as opposed to a truth which involves the whole of us, heart as well as mind.  That acronym had never occurred to me.  I chose the name It intuitively, because an IT does not have a heart or soul.  And I did not understand consciously at the time of writing that the intellect, when it is not informed by the heart, is evil."
 

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